Skip to main content

Full text of "Annual report of the Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board"

See other formats


X 



X 



rb 



LE 




j^w-si.^ 




Given By 



^a^vo^c^^VavA^^V^ foortd 



^ 






» 



/ 



Public Document No. 57. 

SEVENTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

METROPOLITAN WATER AND 
SEWERAGE BOARD. 



For the Year 1917. 




z?^< 

BOSTON: 

WRIGHT & POTTER PRINTING CO., STATE PRINTERS, 

32 DERNE STREET. 

1918. 



G</rv 

Publication of this Document 

approved by the 
Supervisor of Administration. 



CONTENTS. 



(7) 

(8) 

(9) 

(10) 



(2) 
(3) 
(4) 
(5) 
(6) 
(7) 



I. Organization and Administration, 
Board, Officers and Employees, 
II. Metropolitan Water District, . 

III. Metropolitan Water Works — Construction, 

IV. Water Works — Maintenance, . 

(1) Storage Reservoirs, . 

(2) Aqueducts, . . . . 

(3) Pumping Stations, . . . 

(4) Protection of the Water Supply, 

(5) Clinton Sewerage Works, 

(6) Forestry, . . . . 
Wachusett Power Plant, 
Sudbury Power Plant, 
Rainfall and Water Supply, 
Water Consumption, 

Water Works — Financial Statement, 

(1) Water Loans — Receipts and Payments, 
Total Water Debt, December 31, 1917, 

Metropolitan Water Loan and Sinking Fund, December 31, 1917 
Water Assessment, 1917, 

Supplying Water to Cities and Towns outside of District and to Water 
Expenditures for the Different Works, 
Detailed Financial Statement under Metropolitan Water Act 

(a) Expenditures and Disbursements, . 

(b) Receipts, . . . .' ". . 

(c) Assets, . . . ... 

(d) Liabilities, . . 
VI. Metropolitan Sewerage Works, ..... 

(1) North Metropolitan Sewerage System — Construction, 
North Metropolitan Sewerage System — Maintenance, 

Sewers and Pumping Stations, .... 
South Metropolitan Sewerage System — Construction, 
South Metropolitan Sewerage System — Maintenance, 

Sewers and Pumping Stations, .... 
VII. Sewerage Works — Financial Statement, .... 
(1) Metropolitan Sewerage Loans, Receipts and Payments, 

North Metropolitan System, .... 

South Metropolitan System, .... 

Total Sewerage Debt, December 31, 1917, 

North Metropolitan System, .... 

South Metropolitan System, .... 

North and South Metropolitan Loan and Sinking Funds, December 31 
Annual Appropriations, Receipts and Expenditures, 
Sewer Assessments, 1917, 
Expenditures for the Different Works, 
Detailed Financial Statement, 

(a) Expenditures and Disbursements, 

(b) Receipts, .... 

(c) Assets, .... 

(d) Liabilities, .... 
VIII. Recommendations for Legislation, 



(2) 

(3) 
(4) 



(2) 



(3) 
(4) 
(5) 
(6) 
(7) 



Companies, 



1917, 



IV 



CONTENTS. 



Line, 



Report of Chief Engineer of Water Works, . 
Organization, ..... 
Construction, ..... 
Deferred Projects, 

Wachusett-Sudbury Power Transmission 
Additional Northern High-service Pipe Line and Pumping 
Meters and Connections, 
Maintenance, ..... 
Rainfall and Yield of Watersheds, . 
Storage Reservoirs, 

Wachusett Reservoir, 

Sudbury Reservoir, 

Framingham Reservoir No. 3, . 

Framingham Reservoirs Nos. 1 and 2, 

Farm Pond, .... 

Lake Cochituate, 
Aqueducts, ..... 

Wachusett Aqueduct, 

Sudbury Aqueduct, 

Weston Aqueduct, . 

Cochituate Aqueduct, 
Sanitary Inspection of Watersheds, 

Wachusett Watershed, 

Sudbury Watershed, 

Cochituate Watershed, 
Protection of the Water Supply, 

Filtration and Chlorination, 

Improvement of Swamps and Brooks, 
Clinton Sewage Disposal Works, 
Forestry, ..... 

Wachusett Department, . 

Sudbury Department, 

Pipe Lines and Reservoirs Department, 
Hydro-electric Service, . 

Wachusett Power Station, 

Sudbury Power Station, . 
Distribution Pumping Service, 

Chestnut Hill Pumping Stations, 

Spot Pond Pumping Station, . 

Arlington Pumping Station, 

Hyde Park Pumping Station, . 
Distribution Reservoirs, 

Weston Reservoir, . 

Chestnut Hill, Fisher Hill and Waban Hill Reservoirs, 

Spot Pond, Fells and Bear Hill Reservoirs, 

Bellevue and Forbes Hill Reservoirs, 

Arlington and Mystic Reservoirs, 

Mystic Lake, Conduit and Pumping Station, 

Grounds at Arlington and Hyde Park Pumping Stations, 

Protection of Water Supply, 
Distribution Pipe Lines, 

Pipe Bridges, 

Pipe Yards, .... 

Meters, Regulating Valves and Recording Pressure Gages, 

Breaks and Leaks, ...... 

Emergency Pipe Line Service, .... 
Consumption of Water, ..... 

Installation of Meters on Service Pipes, 
Water supplied outside of Metropolitan Water District, 
Protection of Water Works Structures, 
Quality of the Water, ...... 

Engineering, ....... 



Ashland, Hopkinton and Whitehall Reservoirs 



Machinery 



CONTENTS. 



Report of Chief Engineer of Sewerage Works, 

Organization, ...... 

Metropolitan Sewerage Districts, . 

Areas and Populations, .... 

Metropolitan Sewers, ..... 

Sewers purchased and constructed and their Connections, 
Construction, ...... 

North Metropolitan Sewerage System, 

Section 1, Deer Island Outfall Extension, 
Extension to Reading, 
South Metropolitan Sewerage System, 
Wellesley Extension, . . . . 

Section 98, Wellesley Extension, 
Section 99, Wellesley Extension, 
Section 100, Wellesley Extension, 
Section 101, Wellesley Extension, 
Section 102, Wellesley Extension, 
Maintenance, ...... 

Scope of Work and Force employed, 
Deer Island Pumping Station, . 
East Boston Pumping Station, 
Charlestown Pumping Station, 
Ward Street Pumping Station, 
Seattle Street Conduit Crossing, 
Nut Island, ..... 

Government Use of Old 24-inch Quincy Force Main, 
Study of Sewerage in Mill Brook Valley in Arlington, 
Gasolene in Public Sewers, .... 

Drainage from Tanneries, Gelatine and Glue Works 

Stoneham, . 

Data relating to Areas and Populations contributing Sewage 
Sewerage System, 

North Metropolitan System, 
South Metropolitan System, 
Whole Metropolitan System, 
Pumping Stations, . . .. 

Capacity and Results, 
North Metropolitan System, 

Deer Island Pumping Station, . 
East Boston Pumping Station, . 
Charlestown Pumping Station, . 
Alewife Brook Pumping Station, 
South Metropolitan System, 

Ward Street Pumping Station, . 
Quincy Pumping Station, . 
Nut Island Screen-house, . 
Quincy Sewage Lifting Station, . 
Metropolitan Sewerage Outfalls, 
Material intercepted at the Screens, 



in Winchester, Woburn and 



to Metropolitan 



PAGE 

106 
106 
107 
107 
108 
108 
111 
111 
111 
112 
112 
112 
112 
113 
113 
113 
113 
114 
114 
115 
115 
115 
115 
116 
116 
116 
116 
120 



Appendix No. 1. - 

Appendix No. 2. ■ 
Table No. 1 

Table No. 2 

Table No. 3 

Table No. 4, 

Table No. 5. 

Table No. 6. 



- Contracts relating to the Metropolitan Water Works made and pending dur- 

ing the Year 1917, 142 

— Tables relating to the Maintenance of the Metropolitan Water Works, . 149 

— Monthly Rainfall in Inches at Various Places on the Metropolitan Water 

Works in 1917, 149 

— Rainfall in Inches at Jefferson, Mass., in 1917, ..... 150 

— Rainfall in Inches at Framingham, Mass., in 1917, .... 151 

— Rainfall in Inches at Chestnut Hill Reservoir in 1917, .... 152 

— Rainfall in Inches on the Wachusett Watershed, 1897 to 1917, . . 154 

— Rainfall in Inches on the Sudbury Watershed, 1875 to 1917, . . . 155 



vi . CONTEXTS. 

Appendix No. 2 — Continued. page 

Table No. 7. — Yield of the Wachusett Watershed in Gallons per Day per Square Mile 

from 1897 to 1917, . . .157 

Table No. 8. — Yield of the Sudbury Watershed in Gallons per Day per Square Mile 

from 1875 to 1917, 159 

Table No. 9. — Wachusett System. — Statistics of Flow of Water, Storage and Rainfall 

in 1917, . . . • 163 

Table No. 10. — Sudbury System. — Statistics of Flow of Water, Storage and Rainfall in 

1917 164 

Table No. 11. — Cochituate System. — Statistics of Flow of Water, Storage and Rainfall 

in 1917, 165 

Table No. 12. — Elevations of Water Surfaces of Reservoirs above Boston City Base at 

the Beginning of Each Month, ........ 166 

Table No. 13. — Sources from which and Periods during which Water has been drawn for 

the Supply of the Metropolitan Water District, . . . . .167 

Table No. 14. — Average Daily Quantity of Water flowing through Aqueducts in 1917 by 

Months, ............ 168 

Table No. 15. — Statement of Operation of Engines Nos. 1 and 2 at Chestnut Hill Pump- 
ing Station No. 1 for the Year 1917, ....... 169 

Table No. 16. — Statement of Operation of Engine No. 3 at Chestnut Hill Pumping Station 

No. 1 for the Year 1917 170 

Table No. 17. — Statement of Operation of Engine No. 4 at Chestnut Hill Pumping Station 

No. 1 and Summary for the Station for the Year 1917, . . . 171 
Table No. 18. — Statement of Operation of Engines Nos. 5, 6 and 7 at Chestnut Hill Pump- 
ing Station No. 2 for the Year 1917 172 

Table No. 19. — Statement of Operation of Engine No. 12 at Chestnut Hill Pumping 

Station No. 2 for the Year 1917 173 

Table No. 20. — Statement of Operation of Engine No. 8 at Spot Pond Pumping Station 

for the Year 1917, 174 

Table No. 21. — Statement of Operation of Engine No. 9 at Spot Pond Pumping Station 

for the Year 1917, . . . 175 

Table No. 22. — Statement of Operation of Engine No. 10 at Arlington Pumping Station 

for the Year 1917, 176 

Table No. 23. — Statement of Operation of Engine No. 11 at Arlington Pumping Station 

for the Year 1917, 177 

Table No. 24. — Statement of Operation of Engines Nos. 13 and 14 at Hyde Park Pumping 

Station for the Year 1917, 178 

Table No. 25. — (Meter Basis) Average Daily Consumption of Water by Districts in Cities 

and Towns supplied by the Metropolitan Water Works in 1917, . . 179 

Table No. 26. — (Meter Basis) Average Daily Consumption of Water in Cities and Towns 

supplied from Metropolitan Works in 1917, ..... 180 

Table No. 27. — (Pump Basis) Consumption of Water in the Metropolitan Water District, 
as constituted in the Year 1917, and a Small Section of the Town of 

Saugus, from 1893 to 1917 183 

Table No. 28. — Chemical Examinations of Water from the Wachusett Reservoir, Clinton, . 185 
Table No. 29. — Chemical Examinations of Water from the Sudbury Reservoir, . . 186 

Table No. 30. — Chemical Examinations of Water from Spot Pond, Stoneham, . . . 187 

Table No. 31. — Chemical Examinations of Water from Lake Cochituate, . . . 188 

Table No. 32. — Chemical Examinations of Water from a Tap at the State House, Boston, 189 
Table No. 33. — Averages of Examinations of Water from Various Parts of the Metropolitan 

Water Works in 1917, 190 

Table No. 34. — Chemical Examinations of Water from a Faucet in Boston, from 1892 to 

1917, 191 

Table No. 35. — Microscopic Organisms in Water from Various Parts of the Metropolitan 

Water Works, from 1898 to 1917, inclusive, 192 

Table No. 36. — Number of Bacteria per Cubic Centimeter in Water from Various Parts of 

the Metropolitan Water Works, from 1898 to 1917, inclusive, . . 194 

Table No. 37. — Colors of Water from Various Parts of the Metropolitan Water Works in 

1917, 195 

Table No. 38. — Temperatures of Water from Various Parts of the Metropolitan Water 

Works in 1917 196 

Table No. 39. — Temperatures of the Air at Three Stations on the Metropolitan Water 

Works in 1917, 197 



CONTENTS. vii 

Appendix No. 2 — Concluded. page 

Table No. 40. — Table showing Length of Main Lines of Water Pipes and Connections 
owned and operated by Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board, and 

Number of Valves set in Same, Dec. 31, 1917, 198 

Table No. 41. — Statement of Cast-iron Hydrant, Blow-off and Drain Pipes, owned and 

operated by Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board, Dec. 31, 1917, . 199 
Table No. 42. — Length of Water Pipes, Four Inches in Diameter and Larger, in the Several 
Cities and Towns supplied by the Metropolitan Water Works, Dec. 31, 
1917, .... .;•.... . . '. . . .200 

Table No. 43. — Number of Service Pipes, Meters and Fire Hydrants in the Several Cities 

and Towns supplied by the Metropolitan Water Works, . . . 201 

Table No. 44. — Average Elevations of the Hydraulic Grade Line in Feet above Boston 
City Base for each Month at Stations on the Metropolitan Water Works 
during 1917, . . . . ' . . . ..... .202 

Appendix No. 3. — Water Works Statistics for the Year 1917, ...... 204 

Appendix No. 4. — Contracts relating to the Metropolitan Sewerage Works, made and pending 

during the Year 1917, 206 

Appendix No. 5. — Financial Statement presented to the General Court on Jan. 16, 1918, . 211 

Appendix No. 6. — Legislation of the Year 1917 affecting the Metropolitan Water and Sewerage 

Board, 216 



Metropolitan Watee and Seweeage Boaed. 



To the Honorable the Senate and House of Representatives of the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts in General Court assembled. 

The Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board, established under 
the provisions of chapter 168 of the Acts of the year 1901, has 
already presented to your Honorable Body an abstract of the account 
of its receipts, expenditures, disbursements, assets and liabilities for 
the fiscal year ending on November 30, 1917, and now, in accord- 
ance with the provisions of chapter 235 of the Acts of the year 
1906, presents a detailed statement of its doings for the calendar 
year ending on December 31, 1917, being its 

SEVENTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT. 

I. ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION. 

Board, Officers and Employees. 

The term of office of Henry P. Walcott expired on March 20, 
and he was reappointed for the term of three years next succeeding. 
At the end of the year the Board consisted of Henry P. Walcott, 
chairman, Edward A. McLaughlin and Thomas E. Dwyer. William 
N. Davenport has continued as secretary. Alfred F. Bridgman has 
been the purchasing agent and Miss Alice G. Mason the bookkeeper. 

There are also employed in the administrative office a paymaster, 
an assistant in auditing, a first clerk, one general clerk, two stenog- 
raphers and clerks, a telephone operator, and a janitor with two 
assistants, both of whom act as watchmen. 

Such general conveyancing work and investigation of real estate 
titles in the different counties as have been called for during the 
year have been performed by George D. Bigelow. 

The consulting engineers of the Board are Hiram F. Mills and 
Frederic P. Stearns, who are called upon for services when matters 
arise which require their consideration. 



2 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

William E. Foss is Chief Engineer of Water Works and John L. 
Howard Assistant to the Chief Engineer. The following are super- 
intendents of departments under the direction of the Chief Engineer: 
Eliot R. B. Allardice, Superintendent of the Wachusett Department; 
Charles E. Haberstroh, Superintendent of the Sudbury and Co- 
chituate Works and of the portion of the Weston Aqueduct above 
the Weston Reservoir; Samuel E. Killam, Superintendent in charge 
of the Weston Reservoir and the remaining portion of the Weston 
Aqueduct, and of all distributing reservoirs and pipe lines within 
the Metropolitan Water District; and Arthur E. O'Neil, Superin- 
tendent of the several Water Works pumping stations. 

The average engineering force employed on construction and main- 
tenance during the year has included, in addition to the Chief 
Engineer, 1 assistant to Chief Engineer, 4 department superintend- 
ents, 1 division engineer, 8 assistant engineers and 26 others in 
various engineering capacities, and as sanitary inspectors, clerks, 
stenographers and messengers, the total force numbering 41. 

A maintenance force in addition to those engaged in engineering 
capacities, as above mentioned, numbering upon the average during 
the year 284, has been required at the pumping stations, upon 
reservoirs, aqueducts, pipe lines and upon minor construction work. 
At the end of the year this force numbered 282. 

Frederick D. Smith is Chief Engineer of Sewerage Works. He 
has been assisted by Henry T. Stiff, Division Engineer in charge 
of the office and drafting, by 4 assistant engineers and by 17 others 
employed in different engineering capacities, and by 2 stenographers 
and clerks. 

The maximum engineering force employed at any one time during 
the year on the construction and maintenance of the Sewerage 
Works was 26. 

The regular maintenance force required in addition for the opera- 
tion of the pumping stations, the care and inspection of the sewers, 
and for other parts of the Sewerage Works, exclusive of the engineers 
and day-labor forces, on the average has been 160. 

The whole regular force of the Sewerage Department at the end 
of the year numbered 182, of whom the Chief Engineer and 21 
assistants and draftsmen were engaged in general upon the works, 
and of the remainder, 96 were employed upon the North System 
and 64 upon the South System. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 3 

The maximum number of men employed upon contracts and upon 
day-labor construction on the Sewerage Works during the year was 
for the week ending September 22, when the number amounted to 
180. 

II. METROPOLITAN WATER DISTRICT. 

The Metropolitan Water District now comprises the cities of 
Boston, Chelsea, Everett, Maiden, Medford, Melrose, Newton, 
Quincy, Revere and Somerville, and the towns of Arlington, Bel- 
mont, Lexington, Milton, Nahant, Stoneham, Swampscott, Water- 
town and Winthrop, — in all 10 cities and 9 towns. The District 
has an area of 174.8 square miles, no additional municipalities 
having been admitted into the District during the year. Its popu- 
lation, according to the State Census taken for April 1, 1915, was 
1,201,300. The population of the District on July 1, 1917, the 
date upon which calculations for the Water Works are based, was 
estimated as 1,260,480. 

III. METROPOLITAN WATER WORKS — CONSTRUCTION. 

The total amount expended for the construction and acquisition 
of the Metropolitan Water Works since the passage of the Metro- 
politan Water Act in the year 1895 has been $42,983,832.39. 

The total amount expended during the calendar year on account 
of the construction and acquisition of works has been $60,240.76. 
The details of this expenditure are as follows: on account of the 
construction of a steel tank or reservoir on Bellevue Hill with con- 
necting pipe lines the sum of $354.13; for work on account of the 
power plant at Sudbury Dam and the construction of the Wachusett- 
Sudbury transmission line, $23,191.15; for relocation of meters and 
connections, $19,071.49; for installing a new pumping engine at the 
Arlington pumping station, $7,434.14; for stock on hand, $9,334.93; 
and for other minor works, engineering and administration expenses, 
the sum of $854.92. 

The construction of an electric transmission line from the Sud- 
bury Dam power station to the similar station at the Wachusett 
Dam is so far completed that the production of power at these two 
stations can be used in the most advantageous manner during the 
coming season. The line, with very few exceptions, has been laid 
out on lands of the Commonwealth which are Under the control of 
the Board. The Metropolitan District will then have secured and 



4 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

will continue to receive for all time a very substantial income, 
which will not only do something to relieve the burden of debt 
resting upon the District but will also more than restore to the 
district, in which a serious destruction of existing water powers was 
made, an amount of power far in excess of anything which that 
district had ever enjoyed. 

During the year the Board acquired the fee of 2.36 acres of land 
in Southborough for the construction of the Wachusett-Sudbury 
transmission line. 

By chapter 814 of the Acts of 1913 authority was given the Board 
to improve Beaver Dam Brook in the towns of Ashland, Framing- 
ham, Sherborn and Natick. The improvement was offered for 
contract on July 24, 1916, but the lowest bid was $20,000 in excess 
of the amount available for the work and the Board was accordingly 
unable to carry out the provisions of this legislation. The Board 
has, however, by the employment of its own working force, effected 
an improvement in the condition of the bed and banks of this stream 
sufficient to obviate, for the present at least, any anxiety as to its 
influence upon the health of the surrounding territory or an increasing 
menace to the waters of Lake Cochituate. 

In several directions there will be needed very large expenditures 
for construction in the immediate future. The Board has hesitated 
to bring them forward during these troubled times, but a much 
longer delay to do so would be inexcusable. Additional pipe lines 
are needed for the better and safer supply of the District. These 
will require large amounts of money and the work will, of necessity, 
involve much time in its execution. Whenever the growth of the 
population makes imperative the use of all the sources of water 
now available some system of filtration must be established in order 
to maintain the satisfactory quality of the water now supplied. 
Consideration has already been given to this subject and preliminary 
plans have been suggested. 

Some encouragement to large expenditures may be found in the 
fact that in this District water for domestic uses is the only article 
indispensable to man's life which has not been increased in price 
by the present disturbed conditions in the world. 

In the minds of some not familiar with systems of water works 
there seems to exist an idea that when great works have been con- 
structed the labors of oversight have ended. As a matter of fact 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 5 

they have then become most urgent. The State Board of Health 
in its report of 1895 upon a Metropolitan Water System very care- 
fully stated the many problems which the coming water board 
would have to meet, and experience has shown that the statement 
was not overdrawn. 

It may be claimed with entire justice that the ability adequately 
to maintain a complicated system of water supply requires qualifi- 
cations not inferior to those of the men employed in the original 
construction however they may differ in character. 

IV. WATER WORKS — MAINTENANCE. 

The maintenance and operation of the Metropolitan Water Works 
during the past calendar year have required the expenditure of 
$535,195.76. 

(1) Storage Reservoirs. 

The water in the Wachusett Reservoir reached its highest eleva- 
tion, 395.55, on June 17. 

The Sudbury Reservoir was at elevation 258.49 at the beginning 
of the year and was kept at this elevation until flash-boards were 
put in place April 9. From this time the w T ater was maintained 
between elevations 259 and 260 until early in November when it 
was drawn down to elevation 257 to facilitate the erection of the 
poles for the Wachusett-Sudbury transmission line. During the 
winter the water in Framingham Reservoir No. 3 was kept below 
the crest of the overflow and during warm weather the water was 
kept above the crest between elevations 185 and 186. Water was 
drawn from Lake Cochituate for the water supply in August and 
September. 

It has not been necessary to draw water for the supply of the 
Metropolitan District from Framingham Reservoir No. 1, Framing- 
ham Reservoir No. 2, Ashland, Hopkinton and Whitehall reservoirs. 

(2) Aqueducts. 

The Wachusett Aqueduct was in service for the passage of water 
from the Wachusett Reservoir to the Sudbury Reservoir during the 
whole or portions of 302 days. The quantity of water flowing 
through the aqueduct was equal to an average of 90,120,000 gallons 
per day for the entire year. Of the total quantity of water ad- 



6 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



mitted to the aqueduct 99.1 per cent, was used before its admission 
for the development of electric energy. 

For distribution to the cities and towns of the Metropolitan 
District water was drawn through the Sudbury Aqueduct to the 
Chestnut Hill Reservoir every day in the year, the daily average 
for the whole year being 55,553,000 gallons. 

The Weston Aqueduct was in use on 304 days, the quantity of 
water delivered through the aqueduct being equivalent to a daily 
average of 52,079,000 gallons. 

Water was discharged through the Cochituate Aqueduct on 
29 days during the year, the total quantity of water discharged 
being 125,400,000 gallons. 

(3) Pumping Stations. 

The total amount of water pumped at all the pumping stations 
was 23,608,020,000 gallons, which is 1,568,750,000 gallons more than 
in the previous year. 

The following are the several pumping stations : — 



Number 

of 
Engines. 



Contract 

Capacity per 

Day 

(Gallons). 



Lift 
(Feet). 



Chestnut Hill high-service station, 
Chestnut Hill low-service station, 
Chestnut Hill low-service station, 
Spot Pond station, 
Arlington station, 
Hyde Park station, 



66,000,000 

105,000,000 

40,000,000 

30,000,000 

3,000,000 

6,000,000 



138 

60 

130 

125 

290 
140 



The amount expended for the operation of the stations was 
$135,215.75, which is $36,942.53 more than for the year 1916. 

The total amount of coal purchased during the year was 9,236.93 
gross tons, of which 5,814.87 tons were bituminous and 3,422.06 
tons anthracite. All of the anthracite coal was screenings. The 
average cost of bituminous coal delivered in the bins at the various 
stations varied from $5.55 to $8.81, and the average cost of anthra- 
cite coal varied from $4.06 to $5.39. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 7 

(4) Protection of the Water Supply. 

The Marlborough Brook filter-beds, on which is filtered the water 
received from brooks passing through the thickly settled portions of 
Marlborough, have been adequate for the filtration of all the water 
received. 

The Pegan Brook pumping station, at which is pumped upon the 
filter-beds the surface drainage of about one square mile in the 
thickly settled portion of Natick, was in successful operation on 234 
days in the year. 

The filter-beds which receive for filtration the water flowing 
through the thickly settled portion of the town of Sterling, as well 
as the smaller filter-beds which receive the drainage from a few 
houses near Sterling Junction, the Worcester County Training 
School at West Boylston and from the swimming pool at South- 
borough, have been in successful operation and required only the 
usual attention during the year. 

Studies for the disposal of manufacturing wastes, as well as for 
the disposal of house drainage from the various towns within the 
drainage area of the Metropolitan Water System, have been in 
progress during the year. 

Constant inspection of the watersheds has been maintained by 
the Sanitary Inspector and his assistants and members of the main- 
tenance force. 

Chemical examinations of the waters used were made by the 
State Department of Health, and in addition, microscopical and 
bacterial examinations were made by the Board. These examina- 
tions enable the Board to take measures to remedy any difficulties 
which are found to exist. 

The quality of the water brought to the Metropolitan District 
continues to be satisfactory both in taste and in appearance. This 
condition results in a large measure from the fact that it is still 
possible to reject some of the sources which were in use before the 
extension of the water works to the South Branch of the Nashua 
River at Clinton. The water derived from the Wachusett watershed 
has been superior to that coming from the Sudbury and Cochituate 
sources. The first-named supply, so far as possible, has been that 
conveyed to the District; the others have been wasted to a greater 
or less extent as occasion has permitted. 



8 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

The time, however, is approaching when all the sources will be 
required for the supply of the District. When that day arrives it 
will be necessary, without doubt, to filter these inferior waters in 
order to bring them to the standard of excellence to which the Dis- 
trict has become accustomed since the establishment of the Metro- 
politan Water Supply. 

During the year the Board acquired the fee of 15.81 acres of 
land in Boylston for the protection and improvement of the water 
supply. 

(5) Clinton Sewerage Works. 

The Board has maintained and operated since September 15, 1899, 
works for the disposal of the sewage of the town of Clinton on lands 
acquired for the purpose in the town of Lancaster under the author- 
ity of chapter 557 of the Acts of the year 1898. By section 3 of 
this chapter "The metropolitan water board shall maintain and 
operate the works constructed by it, unless otherwise agreed by 
said board and the town of Clinton, until the sewage of said town 
shall have outgrown the normal capacity of the south branch of the 
Nashua river to properly dispose thereof; and then said board shall 
transfer to said town all the works, lands, water rights, rights of 
way, easements and other property constructed and acquired under 
the provisions hereof, upon such terms as may be agreed upon by 
said board and said town, and thereafter said works, lands, water 
rights, rights of way, easements and other property shall be owned, 
maintained and operated by the town of Clinton under the super- 
vision and control of the state board of health, and said town shall 
pay to the Commonwealth for the property so transferred such sum 
or sums, if any, as may be agreed by said town and said board to 
be just and proper." 

In the opinion of the Board the time is near at hand, if it has 
not already been reached, when this provision of the statute should 
become operative. Repeated examinations of the material now 
treated upon the South Lancaster filter-beds both as to quantity 
and quality would seem to show that the amount of sewage here 
treated could not be turned into the South Branch of the Nashua 
River without producing conditions of serious importance to the 
inhabitants of the towns on the stream below this point. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 9 

(6) Forestry. 

An area of about 74 acres back of the westerly portion of the 
North Dike at the Wachusett Reservoir was cleared of a growth 
of scrub oak and planted with four-year-old white pine seedlings 
from the North Dike nursery. An area of 3 J acres located near 
the terminal chamber of the Wachusett Aqueduct was cleared and 
planted with four-year-old white pine seedlings from the North 
Dike nursery. 

Along the open channel of the Wachusett Aqueduct in South- 
borough and the marginal lands of the Wachusett Reservoir in 
Clinton, Boylston, and West Boylston 103| acres of water works 
land were planted with four-year-old white pine seedlings from the 
North Dike nursery and five-year-old white spruce seedlings from 
the Oakdale nursery. In this work 98,100 white pine and 1,300 
white spruce seedlings were used. In the fall 8,550 five-year-old 
white pine seedlings were planted to fill in where trees from previous 
plantings had died, and about 700 white pine trees 18 to 24 inches 
in height were set out on the site of three buildings which were 
removed from water works land between High Street and the Clinton 
sewerage filter-beds in Lancaster. 

There are now in the Oakdale nursery 202,870 seedlings from one 
to six years old and in the North Dike nursery 44,000 three and 
five-year-old seedlings, which are ready for future planting. 

Since the beginning of forestal work on Wachusett Reservoir 
marginal lands, 1,497 acres have been planted. 

About 28 acres of Sudbury Reservoir marginal lands were cleared 
of small trees and brush and 49,300 three-year-old white pine seed- 
lings, 43,700 three-year-old Scotch pines, 44,050 three-year-old red 
pines and 43,500 four-year-old white spruces were planted from the 
nursery. Fifteen hundred three-year-old white pines were set out 
west of Edgell Street, Nobscot and 1,500 were set out on the gravel 
slope between the aqueduct and the old Connecticut Path in Way- 
land. 

The ravages of the gypsy and brown-tail moths and of the elm- 
leaf beetle and the pine tree weevil have continued during the year, 
requiring a large amount of work and considerable expense to pro- 
tect the trees on lands controlled by the Board. The egg clusters of 
the gypsy moth have been painted with creosote and nests of the 



, 10 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

brown-tail moth destroyed by burning, and extensive spraying has 
been required for the preservation of trees infested by moths and 
elm-leaf beetles. It has been noticed that the brown-tail moth has 
entirely disappeared from water works lands in the Wachusett 
Department. The pine tree blister has not yet been found on the 
Wachusett Reservoir lands. 

(7) Wachusett Power Plant. 
The hydro-electric power station at the Wachusett Dam was 
operated on 299 days during the year. The energy not used in 
connection with the operation of the Metropolitan Water Works 
was sold to the New England Power Company under an agreement 
made September 30, 1916, which provides that until the completion 
of the Wachusett-Sudbury transmission line the Company will take 
as much energy from the Wachusett power station as it can reason- 
ably and properly use without wasting water at its own plants. 
The operation of the plant continues to be successful, the gross 
earnings for the year being $37,269.46. The cost of operating the 
plant has been $16,948.98, the net earnings $20,320.48, and the net 
earnings per thousand kilowatt hours generated, $2.89. 

(8) Sudbury Power Plant. 
The hydro-electric power station at the Sudbury Dam was oper- 
ated on 304 days during the year. The entire output, with the 
exception of a small amount of energy used for lighting the station 
and operating the electrically driven accessories, has been sold to 
the Edison Electric Illuminating Company of Boston under a con- 
tract dated December 21, 1914. The gross earnings for the year 
were $30,962.47, the cost of operating the plant $18,581.26 and the 
net earnings $12,111.21. The net earnings per thousand kilowatt 
hours generated were $2,466. 

(9) Rainfall and Water Supply. 

The rainfall is still below the average, and somewhat less than 
in the preceding year. On the Wachusett watershed the rainfall 
was 37.26 inches and on the Sudbury watershed 41.51 inches, while 
the averages for the periods covered by the records have been, 
respectively, 44.91 inches and 44.60 inches. 

The Wachusett watershed yielded a daily average of 834,000 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 11 

gallons per square mile, which is 78.5 per cent, of the average for 
the past twenty-one years, and the Sudbury watershed yielded a 
daily average of 750,000 gallons per square mile, which is 76.5 per 
cent, of the average for the past forty-three years. The yield from 
the Cochituate watershed was 786,000 gallons per day per square 
mile, which is 85.5 per cent, of the average for the past fifty-five 
years. 

(10) Watee Consumption. 

During the year the quantity of water supplied to the Metro- 
politan Water District amounted to a daily average of 110,032,300 
gallons as measured by Metropolitan Water Works meters, which 
was equivalent to 90 gallons for each person in the District. This 
quantity was 3,699,500 gallons more than the average daily con- 
sumption of the preceding year. 

Acting under the authority conferred by several statutes and 
arrangements which have been made, water has been supplied to a 
limited extent outside of the Metropolitan Water District. There 
has been drawn from the open channel of the Wachusett Aqueduct 
for the use of the Westborough State Hospital a daily average 
quantity of 157,000 gallons. The town of Framingham has, under 
the provisions of the statute, drawn indirectly from Farm Pond a 
daily average quantity of 569,300 gallons and directly from the 
Sudbury Aqueduct 499,452 gallons. A portion of the town of 
Saugus has been supplied through the city of Revere with an average 
of 12,900 gallons daily. The United States Government, for use on 
Peddock's Island, has been supplied with a daily average of 87,300 
gallons. The sums charged for the water thus supplied have 
amounted to $8,598.58. 

V. WATER WORKS — FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 

The financial abstract of the receipts, disbursements, assets and 
liabilities of the Board for the State fiscal year, beginning with 
December 1, 1916, and ending with November 30, 1917, was, in 
accordance with the requirements of chapter 235 of the Acts of the 
year 1906, presented to the General Court in January last, and a 
copy of this financial abstract is printed as Appendix No. 5. 

As required by said chapter a detailed statement of its doings for 
the calendar year 1917, in relation to the Metropolitan Water W T orks, 
is herewith presented. 



12 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

Construction. 

(1) Water Loans — Receipts and Payments. 

Total loans authorized to January 1, 1918, $42,798,000 00 

Receipts from the sales of property applicable to the construc- 
tion and acquisition of works : — 
For the period prior to January 1, 1917, . . $252,478 79 
For the year ending December 31, 1917, . . 1,366 66 

253,845 45 

Receipt from the town of Swampscott for admission to District 

(St. 1909, c. 320), 90,000 00 

Total amount authorized to January 1, 1918, . . . $43,141,845 45 
Amounts approved by Board for payments out of Water Loan 

Fund: — 
Payments prior to January 1, 1917, . . $42,923,591 63 
Approved for year ending December 31, 1917, 60,240 76 

42,983,832 39 

Amount authorized but not expended January 1, 1918, . $158,013 06 

(2) Total Water Debt, December 31, 1917. 

Water Loan Outstanding, Sinking Fund and Debt. 

Bonds issued by the Treasurer of the Commonwealth: — 

Sinking fund bonds (3 and 3| per cent.), $41,398,000 00 

Serial bonds (3£ and 4 per cent.), 1,354,000 00 

Total bond issue to December 31, 1917, ... . . $42,752,000 00 

Serial bonds paid prior to January 1, 1917, . . $72,000 00 
Serial bonds paid in 1917, 32,000 00 

104,000 00 

Total bond issue outstanding December 31, 1917, . . $42,648,000 00 

Gross Water Debt, $42,648,000 00 

Sinking fund December 31, 1917, 14,036,278 88 

Net Water Debt December 31, 1917, . . . . ' . $28,611,721 12 
A decrease for the year of $650,079.52. 



Xo. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



13 



(3) Metropolitan Water Loan and Sinking Fund, 
December 31, 1917. 



Year. 



Authorized 
Loans. 



Bonds 

issued (Sinking 

Fund). 



Bonds 

issued (Serial 

Bonds). 



Sinking Fund. 



1895, 
1896, 
1897, 
1898, 
1899, 
1900, 
1901, 
1902, 
1903, 
1904, 
1905, 
1906, 
1907, 
1908, 
1909, 
1910, 
1911, 
1912, 
1913, 
1914, 
1915, 
1916, 
1917, 



$27,000,000 



13,000,000 



500,000 

398,000 
900,000 
80,000 
212,000 
600,000 
108,000 



$42,798,000 



§5,000,000 
2,000,000 
6,000,000 
4,000,000 
3,000,000 
1,000,000 

10,000,000 
3,500,000 
1,500,000 
2,500,000 
650,000 
1,350,000 



398,000 
500,000 



$41,398,000 



$200,000 
190,000 

258,000 

490,000 

66,000 

150,000 



$1,354,000 



$226,286 05 

699,860 70 

954,469 00 

1,416,374 29 

1,349,332 97 

1,573,619 72 

1,662,426 95 

2,256,803 81 

2,877,835 59 

3,519,602 92 

4,207,045 69 

4,897,822 62 

5,643,575 69 

6,419,283 28 

7,226,262 31 

8,089,902 91 

8,953,437 44 

9,829,356 80 

10,767,701 68 

11,533,453 45 

12,491,245 25 

13,268,199 36 

14,036,278 88 



(4) Water Assessment, 1917. 
The following water assessment was made by the Treasurer of the 
Commonwealth upon the various municipalities: — 



Sinking fund requirements, 

Serial bonds, $37,000 00 

Less premium, 1,260 00 



Interest, 

Maintenance: — 

Appropriated by Legislature, 

Less balance on hand, 

Total water assessment for 1917, 



$260,500 34 



35,740 00 
1,464,158 15 



$572,900 00 
24,985 75 



547,914 25 
. $2,308,312 74 



14 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



In accordance with chapter 488, Acts of 1895, as amended in 1901, 
1904 and 1906, the proportion to be paid by each city and town is 
based one-third in proportion to their respective valuations and 
the remaining two-thirds in proportion to their respective water 
consumption for the preceding year, except that but one-fifth of 
the total valuation and no consumption has been taken for the 
city of Newton, as it has not been supplied with water from the 
Metropolitan Works. 

The division of the assessment for 1917 was as follows: — 



Cities and Towns. 


Assessment. 


Cities and Towns. 


Assessment. 




$20,544 00 
11,132 99 
1,752,004 76 
55,819 61 
54,125 31 
9,357 91 
51,636 95 
33,666 75 
18,835 83 
18,284 15 




$5,539 95 

6,523 29 

59,042 03 

31,688 52 

118,425 67 

8,614 63 

12,460 26 

24,045 68 

16,564 45 




$2,308,312 74 



(5) Supplying Water to Cities and Towns outside of 
District and to Water Companies. 

Sums have been received during 'the year 1917 under the pro- 
visions of the Metropolitan Water Act, for water furnished, as 
follows : — 

City of Revere (on account of water furnished to a portion of the 

town of Saugus for 1916), $400 00 

United States Government (for Peddock's Island), . . . .2,115 79 
Westborough State Hospital, , 1,455 51 



$3,971 30 



The sums so received prior to March 23, 1907, were annually dis- 
tributed among the cities and towns of the District; but since that 
date, in accordance with the provisions of chapter 238 of the Acts 
of 1907, the sums so received have been paid into the sinking fund. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



15 



(6) EXPENDITURES FOE THE DIFFERENT WORKS. 

The following is a summary of the expenditures made in the vari- 
ous operations for the different works : — 



Construction and Acquisition of Works. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1917. 



Administration applicable to all parts of the construction and acquisition of 

the works, 

Wachusett Department, real estate, 

Power Plant at Sudbury Dam, 

Wachusett-Sudbury Power Transmission Line, 

Distribution system: — 
Low service: — 

Pipe lines and connections, 

Northern extra high service : — 

New pumping engine at Arlington pumping station, 
Southern extra high service: — 

Section 44 (12-inch connection in West Roxbury), 

Bellevue Reservoir on Bellevue Hill in Bostorj , 

Weston Aqueduct supply mains 

Meters and connections, 

Stock — pipes, valves, castings, etc., purchased and sent first to storage yards, 
and later transferred, as needed, to the various parts of the work: — 

Amount received, 

Transferred from storage yards to the various sections of the work and in- 
cluded in costs of special works, 



Amount charged from beginning of work to January 1, 1917, 

Total for construction and acquisition of works to January 1, 1918, 



$179 14 



7,434 14 



$658 78 

3 00 

4,971 46 

18,219 69 



9 38 




344 75 


1 


14 00 




19,071 49 






27,052 90 


$19,836 13 


10,501 20 






9,334 93 




60,240 76 




42,923,591 63 


$42,983,832 39 



\ 



16 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Maintenance and Operation. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1917. 



Administration, 

General supervision, 

Taxes and other expenses, 

Wachusett Department: — 

Superintendence 

Reservoir, . 

Forestry, 

Protection of supply, 

Buildings and grounds, 

Wachusett Dam, 

Wachusett Aqueduct, 

Clinton sewerage system : — 

Pumping station, 

Sewers, screens and filter-beds, 

Sanitary inspection, 

Swamp drainage, 

Power plant, 

Payments under Industrial Accident Law and special benefit appropriations, 

Sudbury Department: — 

Superintendence, Framingham office, 

Ashland Reservoir, 

Hopkinton Reservoir, 

Whitehall Reservoir, 

Framingham Reservoirs Nos. 1, 2 and 3, 

Sudbury Reservoir, 

Lake Cochituate, 

Marlborough Brook filters, 

Pegan filters, 

Sudbury and Cochituate watersheds, 

Sanitary inspection, ........... 

Cochituate Aqueduct, 

Sudbury Aqueduct, 

Weston Aqueduct, 

Forestry, 

Power plant, 

Improvement and protection of water supplies, 

Payments under Industrial Accident Law and special benefit appropriations, 

Distribution Department: — 

Superintendence, 

Pumping service: — 

Superintendence, 

Payments under Industrial Accident Law and special benefit appropria- 
tions, 

Arlington pumping station, pumping service, 

Chestnut Hill low-service pumping station, pumping service, 

Chestnut Hill high-service pumping station, pumping service, 

Spot Pond pumping station, pumping service, 

Hyde Park pumping station, pumping service, 

Amounts carried forward, 



$8,018 25 
7,761 31 

13,693 31 

11,638 93 
3,048 24 
7,174 09 

12,321 02 

1,526 16 
5,336 54 
1,171 68 
3,859 34 
6,643 98 
80 78 



$11,435 58 
2,599 77 
2,039 67 
1,007 43 
12,523 08 
8,005 12 
9,342 17 
2,906 95 
4,515 34 
1,723 88 
3,730 68 
3,260 62 
11,823 79 
9,970 78 
7,596 44 
9,877 26 
3,372 50 
510 95 



$6,349 16 
5,098 28 

5 00 

13,418 67 
58,708 65 
26,578 13 
22,801 02 
8,606 00 



$17,876 18 
37,047 60 
42,634 57 



82,273 63 



106,242 01 



$141,564 91 $286,073 99 



Xo. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



17 



Maintenance and Operation. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1917. 



Arnounts brought forward, 



Bear Hill Reservoir, 

Chestnut Hill Reservoir and grounds, 

Fells Reservoir 

Forbes Hill Reservoir, 

Mystic Lake, conduit and pumping station, 

Mystic Reservoir ...... 

Arlington standpipe, ............ 

Waban Hill Reservoir, ........... 

Weston Reservoir, ............ 

Spot Pond, . . 

Buildings at Spot Pond, .......... 

Pipe lines: — 

Low service, 

Northern high service, .......... 

Northern extra high service, ......... 

Southern high service, 

Southern extra high service, ......... 

Supply pipe lines, 

Buildings at Chestnut Hill Reservoir, 

Chestnut Hill pipe yard, 

Glenwood pipe yard and buildings, ........ 

Stables, 

Venturi meters 

Measurement of water, 

Arlington pumping station, buildings and grounds, . . . . . 

Hyde Park pumping station, buildings and grounds, . . . . . 

Fisher Hill Reservoir, ........... 

Bellevue Reservoir, ........... 

Payments under Industrial Accident Law and special benefit appropriatior s, 



Total for maintaining and operating works, 



$141,564 91 $286,073 99 

265 51 
12,134 26 

991 90 

2,074 32 

3,123 61 

1,273 51 

16 14 

207 73 
3,662 06 
8,521 S6 
1,231 39 

25,098 22 
6,399 80 

167 63 
6,165 33 

173 41 

501 04 

13,791 02 

1,414 23 

2,604 57 

9,949 85 

975 08 
1,781 98 

650 68 

587 80 
2,966 66 

251 10 

576 17 
249,121 77 



$535,195 76 



(7) Detailed Financial Statement under Metropolitan 

Water Act. 

The Board herewith presents, in accordance with the requirements 
of the Metropolitan Water Act, a detailed statement of the expendi- 
tures and disbursements, receipts, assets and liabilities for the year 
1917. 

(a) Expenditures and Disbursements. 

The total amount of the expenditures and disbursements on ac- 
count of construction and acquisition of works for the year beginning 
January 1, 1917, and ending December 31, 1917, was 860,240.76 
and the total amount from the time of the organization of the 



IS 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Metropolitan Water Board, July 19, 1895, to December 31, 1917, 
has been $42,983,832.3$. 

For maintenance and operation the expenditures for the year 
were $535,195.76. 

The salaries of the commissioners, and the other expenses of 
administration, have been apportioned to the construction of the 
works and to the maintenance and operation of the same, and 
appear under each of those headings. 

The following is a division of the expenditures according to their 
general character: — 



General Character of Expenditures. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1917. 



Construction* of Works and Acquisttion by Purchase or Taking. 

Administration. 

Clerks and stenographers, 

Stationery and printing, ....... 

Postage, express and telegrams, ..... 

Alterations and repairs of building 

Telephone, lighting, heating, water and care of building, 
Rent and taxes, main office, ...... 

Miscellaneous expenses, 



Engineering 
Chief engineer, . 
Principal assistant engineers, 
Engineering assistants, 
Consulting engineers, 
Inspectors, 

Railroad and street car travel, 
Stationery and printing, . 

Alterations and repairs of building — main office 
Telephone, lighting, heating, water and care of buildings: — 

Main office, 
Rent and taxes, main office, 
Miscellaneous expenses, 



Construction. 
Contracts, Distribution System: — 

Builders Iron Foundry, for furnishing Venturi meters and registers, Con- 
tract 375, ............. 

Coffin Valve Co., for furnishing 36-inch and 48-inch check valves, Con- 
tract 378A, ............ 

Coffin Valve Co.. for furnishing screw-lift water valves, Contract 377, 

Fred A. Houdlette & Son, Inc., for furnishing cast-iron frames and covers, 
Contract 381 

Ludlow Valve Mfg. Co., for furnishing check valves, Contract 378, . 

Amounts carried forward, .......... 



$287 55 

205 27 

40 00 

44 

74 03 

46 49 

5 00 



S303 03 
765 18 

1,387 51 
591 00 
377 50 
212 89 
133 74 
1 34 

222 12 
139 48 
169 26 



SI ,423 00 

2,350 00 
6,965 00 

913 36 
1,019 55 



S658 78 



4,303 05 



$12,670 91 



$4,961 83 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



19 



Geneeal Character of Expenditures. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1917. 



Amounts brought forward, 



Con. 



Construction 
Contracts, Distribution System — Con. 

F. A. Mazzur & Co., for furnishing and installing a centrifugal pumping unit 
at the northern extra high-service pumping station at Arlington, Mass., 
Contract 382, . . . - ' 

New England Structural Co., for furnishing steelwork for valve chambers 
for 36-inch valves, Contract 380, 

Daniel Russell Boiler Works, Inc., for furnishing street chambers for Venturi 
meter registers, Contract 379, . . 

Standard Cast Iron Pipe & Foundry Co., for furnishing special castings, 

Contract 374, 

Contracts, Power Plant at Sudbury Dam: — 

Westinghouse Electric & Mfg. Co., for furnishing and installing hydro- 
electric machinery at Sudbury Dam, Contract 364A, .... 

S. Morgan Smith Co., for furnishing and installing hydraulic machinery at 

Sudbury Dam, Contract 364, . . . 

Contract, Wachusett-Sudbury Power Transmission Line: — 

Fred T. Ley & Co., Inc., for constructing an electric power transmission line 
between the Wachusett Power Station in Clinton and the Sudbury 
Power Station in Southborough, Mass., Contract 385, . . . 

Additional work: — 
Labor, .............. 

Freight and express, 

Jobbing and repairing 

Tools, machinery, appliances and hardware supplies, 

Electrical supplies, 

Castings, ironwork and metals, . 

Iron pipe and valves, . . 

Paint and coating, . . . . . . . . 

Lumber and field buildings, 

Drain pipe 

Brick, cement and stone, 

Sand, gravel and filling, 

Miscellaneous expenses, 



Real Estate. 
Legal and expert: — 
Conveyancing supplies, .... 
Conveyancing expenses, 
Settlements made by the Board, . 



Amount charged from beginning of work to January 1, 1917, 



Total amount of construction expenditures to January 1, 1918, 



$12,670 91 £4,961 83 



3,850 00 

961 17 

1,650 00 

4,264 48 

2,009 19 
1,326 85 

13,294 14 



$8,867 80 


660 34 


214 30 


505 79 


75 88 


465 17 


1,157 86 


350 83 


317 41 


5 85 


695 98 


55 25 


38 55 



$3 00 

88 18 

1,750 00 



40,026 74 



13,411 01 



1,841 18 



60,240 76 
42,923,591 63 

$42,983,832 39 



20 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



General Character of Expenditures. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1917." 



Maintenance and Operation of Works. 
Administration: — 

Commissioners, ........ 

Secretary and assistants, ...... 

Rent, 

Repairs of building, 

Fuel 

Lighting, 

Care of building, 

Postage 

Printing, stationery and office supplies, 

Telephones 

Traveling expenses, ....... 

Miscellaneous expenses, 



General supervision : — 

Chief engineer and assistants, 

Rent, 

Repairs of building, 

Fuel, 

Lighting, . . . . . . . . . . . . 

Care of building, 

Postage, .............. 

Express and telegrams, .......... 

Printing, stationery and office supplies, 

Telephones, 

Traveling expenses, 

Miscellaneous expenses, . . . . . . . . 

Pumping service: — 

Superintendence, ............ 

Labor, 

Fuel '. 

Oil, waste and packing, ........... 

Repairs, .............. 

Small supplies, 

Payments under Industrial Accident Law and special benefit appropriations, 



Reservoirs, aqueducts, pipe lines, buildings and grounds: — 
Superintendents, . 
Engineering assistants, 
Sanitary inspectors, 
Labor, pay roll, 
Labor, miscellaneous, 
Alterations and repairs of pumping stations, 

Amounts carried forward, .... 



$7,416 67 

7,439 93 

703 60 

25 33 

130 60 

76 48 

591 99 

156 00 

1,028 44 

122 70 
61 26 

123 18 



$28,186 37 

2,110 83 

799 61 

391 78 

230 96 

1,776 16 

193 00 

201 30 

1,284 05 

404 96 

736 30 

732 28 



$5,098 28 

71,117 03 

51,464 65 

1,545 44 

4,873 86 

1,111 49 

5 00 



$7,320 00 

12,575 06 

2,972 58 

197,159 87 

2,703 72 

1,405 06 



$17,876 18 



37,047 60 



135,215 75 



$224,136 29 $190,139 53 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



21 



General Character of Expenditures. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1917. 



Amounts brought forward, 



Reservoirs, aqueducts, pipe lines, buildings and grounds — Con. 

Alterations and repairs of other buildings and structures, 

Automobiles, . 

Brick, 

Brooms, brushes and janitor's supplies, 

Castings, ironwork and metals, 

Cement and lime, . 

Drafting and photo supplies, 

Electrical supplies, 

Fertilizer and planting material, 

Freight and express, 

Fuel, 

Gypsy moth supplies 

Hardware, 

Hay and grain, 

Horses, . 

Lighting, 

Lumber, . 

Machinery, 

Paints and oils, 

Pipe and fittings, 

Postage, . 

Printing, stationery and office supplies 

Rubber and oiled goods, 

Stable expenses, 

Sand, gravel and stone, . 

Traveling expenses, 

Telephones, 

Teaming, 

Tools and appliances, 

Vehicles, harnesses and fittings, 

Miscellaneous expenses, . 
Contracts: — 

Crowley & Hickey, Contract 50-M, for constructing the superstructure of 
garaee at Chestnut Hill Reservoir, 

Payments underlndustrial Accident Law and special benefit appropriations, 



Payments in lieu of taxes, 



§224,136 29 $190,139 53 



5,249 65 

12,029 85 

237 00 

265 77 

1,483 12 

720 59 

204 55 

1,325 49 

2,209 82 

395 78 

2,977 48 

2,755 79 

1,469 82 

1,425 74 

516 00 

307 38 

4,570 80 

1,002 28 

1,698 10 

1,073 00 

95 92 

650 28 

466 47 

776 65 

267 70 

2,381 41 

1,224 77 

3,423 44 

4,195 14 

256 95 

14,548 63 



6,912 10 
1,167 80 



Total expenditures for maintenance and operation, 



302,421 66 
42,634 57 

$535,195 76 



22 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



(b) Receipts. 
The total amount of receipts from the operations of the Board 
and from sales of property for the year beginning January 1, 1917, 
and ending December 31, 1917, was $79,753.69, and the total amount 
from the time of the organization of the Metropolitan Water Board, 
July 19, 1895, to December 31, 1917, has been $1,392,690.87. The 
general character of these receipts is as follows : — 



General Character of Receipts. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1917. 



Applicable to the loan fund: — 

Land and buildings 

Construction tools, supplies and reimbursements, 



Applicable to payment of interest, sinking fund requirements and expenses 
of maintenance and operation: — 
Proceeds from operations of the Board: — 

Rents, 

Land products, . . . . \ . . , 

Electric energy, 

Maintenance labor, tools, supplies and reimbursements, 
Interest and unclassified receipts, .... 



Applicable to the sinking fund: — 
Water supplied to cities and towns, water companies and others, 



Amount credited from beginning of work to January 1, 1917, 
Total receipts to January 1,1918, 



$100 00 
1,266 66 



SI, 631 00 
4,543 72 

64,883 80 

3,254 66 

102 55 



$1,366 66- 



74,415 73 

3,971 30 

$79,753 69 

1,312,937 18 

$1,392,690 87 



The foregoing receipts have been credited to the various objects, 
or works, as follows : — 



No. 57.] 



,AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



23 



Sources of Receipts. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1917. 



Supplying water outside of Water District 
Construction and acquisition of works: — 

Administration, 

Wachusett Reservoir, 

Sudbury Reservoir, 

Distribution system, 

Purchase of existing water works, 



Maintenance and operation of works 
Administration, 
General supervision, 
Wachusett Aqueduct, 
Wachusett Reservoir, 
Wachusett electric power plant, 
Sudbury system, . 
Sudbury electric power plant, 
Distribution system, 
Clinton sewerage system, 



Amount credited from beginning, of work to January 1, 1917, 
Total receipts to January 1, 1918 



250 00 

48 25 

968 41 

100 00 



$132 32 

202 15 

391 61 

3,510 84 

34,319 65 

2,671 67 

30,564 15 

1,716 21 

810 65 



J.971 30 



1,463 14 



74,319 25 

$79,753 69 
1,312,937 18 

$1,392,690 87 



(c) Assets. 

The following is an abstract of the assets of the Water Works, 
a complete schedule of which is kept on file in the office of the 
Board : — 

Office furniture, fixtures and supplies; engineering and scientific instruments 
and supplies; police supplies; horses, vehicles, field machinery, etc.; ma- 
chinery, tools and other appliances and supplies; completed works, real 
estate and buildings connected therewith. 



(d) Liabilities. 

The sums due on monthly pay rolls amount to $355.56 and there 
are bills for current expenses which have not yet been received. 



24 



METROPOLITAN WATER. 



[Pub. Doc. 



Amounts on Monthly Estimates, not due until Completion of Contracts or until 

Claims are settled. 



Name. 


Work. 


Amount. 


Joseph Hanreddy, .... 
F. A. Mazzur & Co., .... 

Fred T. Ley & Co., .... 


Contract 314, Section 7 of the Weston Aqueduct 
Supply Mains. 

Contract 382, for furnishing and installing a cen- 
trifugal pumping unit at the northern extra high 
service pumping station at Arlington, Mass. 

Contract 385, for constructing an electric power 
transmission line between the Wachusett Power 
Station in Clinton, and the Sudbury Power 
Station in Southborough, Mass. 


$10 00 
1,650 00 

2,346 03 



VI. METROPOLITAN SEWERAGE WORKS. 

The North Metropolitan Sewerage District embraces the cities of 
Cambridge, Chelsea, Everett, Maiden, Medford, Melrose, Revere, 
Somerville and Woburn, and the towns of Arlington, Belmont, Read- 
ing, Stoneham, Wakefield, Winchester and Winthrop and parts of 
the city of Boston and the town of Lexington, — comprising in all 
10 cities and 8 towns, with an area of 100.32 square miles. The 
district has an estimated population, based upon the census of 1915, 
as of December 31, 1917, of 633,220. Of the total population it 
is estimated that 89.7 per cent., or 568,075 people, contribute 
sewage to the North Metropolitan System. 

The South Metropolitan Sewerage District includes the cities of 
Newton, Quincy and Waltham, and the towns of Brookline, Milton, 
Watertown and Wellesley, and parts of the city of Boston and the 
town of Dedham, — a total of 4 cities and 5 towns. This district 
has an area of 110.76 square miles, with an estimated population 
as of December 31, 1917, of 473,070. According to the estimates 
made 72.4 per cent, of this population, or 342,715, contribute sewage 
to the South Metropolitan System. 



(1) North Metropolitan Sewerage System — Construction. 

The amount expended for construction on account of the North 
Metropolitan System during the past year was $36,585.93. 

The extension of the Deer Island outfall, authorized by chapter 
344 of the Acts of 1914, has been completed and since the early 
days of December the sewage of the district has been discharged 
through the new openings. 

A carefullv contrived distribution of the effluent matters over a 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 25 

considerable area at a distance below the surface of the harbor 
offers the best obtainable solution of the nuisance hitherto existing. 
So far as could be observed at this season of the year the method 
has been successful. The discharge of sewage from single out- 
lets on the South Metropolitan High-level System near Peddock's 
Island at a considerable depth from the surface of the water has 
been free from objectionable odors and there is every reason for 
expecting results at least as favorable from the Deer Island out- 
falls, which are even more likely to mix thoroughly the sewage with 
large quantities of sea water than has been the case of the outlets 
near Peddock's Island. 

By chapter 159 of the Acts of 1916 the town of Reading became 
a part of the North Metropolitan Sewerage District. The plans for 
the construction of the necessary connecting sewer have been made, 
but no contractor has been found who is willing to undertake its 
construction within the limits of the appropriation made for this 
purpose. 

It cannot be necessary to call the attention of the Legislature to 
the unprecedented conditions which now attend the construction of 
work, public or private. Experienced contractors employed by this 
Board have lost large sums of money in the honest execution of 
their obligations by reason of the rapid increase in wages and in 
materials which are required by the work. These conditions, added 
to the well known uncertainties of any work at considerable depths 
below the surface of the ground, have made contractors reluctant 
to offer bids for public work, except at prices far beyond any which 
would have been thought extravagant a few months ago. 

With all the evident disadvantages of the method of work upon 
a percentage basis, it seems to be at present the more direct path 
to a satisfactory and mutually fair result than any other that occurs 
to us. 

By chapter 56 of the Resolves of the year 1917 the chairman of 
the Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board, the Commissioner of 
Health of the State Department of Health, and the Commissoner 
of Public Works of the city of Boston, acting jointly, were author- 
ized and directed to make an investigation relative to the sewage 
discharged into Boston Harbor and report the results with such 
recommendations as they might deem expedient to the General 
Court. This report has been made. The conclusions of that board 



26 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



do not indicate that any part of such nuisances as may exist in 
Boston Harbor are the results of the discharge of sewage from the 
Metropolitan sewerage outlets. 

The joint board, in concluding its report, points out that the 
State Department of Health is still engaged upon investigations 
upon the recovery of valuable products from sewage. These studies 
have been carried on for many years by the Massachusetts health 
authorities and have attracted the attention of all those w r hose 
opinions have value on this very important subject. 

(2) North Metropolitan Sewerage System — Maintenance. 

The cost of the maintenance and operation of the North Metro- 
politan System during the past year was $196,469.71. 

Sewers and Pumping Stations. 

The Metropolitan sewers in the North Metropolitan System now 
extend a distance of 63.942 miles, and the local sewers which are 
connected with the Metropolitan sewers have a further length of 
769.92 miles, involving 84,182 connections. 

The sewage of the North Metropolitan District flows at first by 
gravity, but before being finally disposed of is lifted at different 
points by pumping and is finally discharged into the harbor from 
an outfall off Deer Island. 

The daily average amount of sewage discharged into the harbor 
was 64,600,000 gallons, a daily average for each person contributing 
sewage of 114 gallons. The decrease in the total amount of sewage 
discharged was 1,700,000 gallons per day less than the discharge of 
the preceding year. The maximum rate of discharge in any one 
day was 161,100,000 gallons. 

The pumping stations operated for the North Metropolitan Sew- 
erage System are as follows : — 





Number 

of 
Engines. 


Contract 

Capacity per 

Day 

(Gallons). 


Lift 

(Feet). 


Deer Island station (Boston Harbor), .... 
East Boston station, ........ 

Charlestown station, 

Alewife Brook station (Somerville), ..... 


4 
4 
3 
3 


235,000,000 

235,000,000 

104,000,000 

22,000,000 


19 
19 

13 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 27 

There were purchased for the operation of the pumping stations 
6,399 tons of bituminous coal and 196 tons of anthracite screenings, 
the average prices of which, at the different stations, varied from 
$6.58 to $10.29 per gross ton for the bituminous coal and from 
$5.70 to $6.72 for the screenings, delivered in the bins. 

The amount expended for the stations was $131,278.30. The 
average cost per million gallons of sewage lifted per foot at the 
several stations was $0,159, an increase of 21 per cent, over the cost 
last year. 

(3) South Metropolitan Sewerage System — Construction. 

The amount expended for construction on account of the South 
Metropolitan System during the past year was $244,746.05. 

The town of Wellesley was admitted to the South Metropolitan 
Sewerage District by chapter 343 of the Acts of 1914, and the act 
was accepted by the town in March, 1915. 

The original estimate for the construction of the Wellesley exten- 
sion, High-level sewer, of $350,000, was made by the State Board 
of Health, and was based on a report submitted by an engineer 
called in by that department to make a survey and estimate. Two 
lines were considered by the Board of Health. The estimate was 
made on the shorter line which came through the location of the 
Brookline Water Works fields. This line was to connect with the 
existing Neponset Valley sewer of the High-level System at a point 
where the sewer has a capacity suitable only for the original district 
for which it was built. 

Because of the small size of this existing Metropolitan sewer and 
the fact that this line extended across the Brookline Water Works 
fields and would interfere with this important supply, and also be- 
cause of the fact that there is a rapidly growing portion of Dedham 
in the vicinity of Bridge Street which is a part of the Metropolitan 
District and has no possible means of reaching the Metropolitan 
System excepting by construction work by the Metropolitan Water 
and Sewerage Board, it was decided to* use the alternate line pro- 
posed by the State Board of Health. This is somewhat longer but 
reaches the existing Metropolitan sewer at a point where the latter 
is of increased size and at the same time furnishes a means of outlet 
for the above-named portion of Dedham and obviates the difficulties 
in connection with our construction in the fields of the Brookline 
Water Works. 



2S METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

The Board has also designed a sewer of considerably larger 
capacity than was anticipated by the State Board of Health, feeling 
that the same is justified by the future demands of the District. 

The line adopted has a length of about 40,000 feet almost wholly 
through private lands. The natural physical conditions in this part 
of the Charles River valley make sewer construction very expensive. 
This is occasioned by the large amount of rock encountered and by 
fine sands and other material in which it is expensive to construct 
and by the remoteness of the location. 

Because of the above-stated conditions, namely, insufficiency of 
the original appropriation, not based on estimates made by the 
Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board, and the necessary changes 
in the location to fit the needs of the District, the bad material 
encountered and, above all, the abnormal conditions of the market 
in regard to labor and supplies, an additional appropriation of 
$325,000 was made by the Legislature of 1917. It is not probable 
that the remainder of this work, consisting of three sections of the 
nine into which the whole line was divided, can be completed within 
the appropriation. The contractor for one of the sections under- 
taken in the year 1917 found difficulties in carrying out his contract 
so serious that he felt obliged to abandon the work before any 
permanent construction of the sewer had been effected. The Board 
then took over the work under the oversight of a sewer builder of 
much experience and the undertaking has been successfully carried 
on under great difficulties and is now substantially completed, but 
at a very large increase in expense over the contract price. 

Borings along the line of the proposed sewer were made in the 
usual manner and samples of the materials found in the borings 
were exhibited to those who proposed to bid for the work, but even 
experienced contractors misjudged the probable behavior of these 
materials and the cost of the work has far outrun the estimates. 

An additional appropriation of $200,000 has been asked for the 
completion of this sewer of which more than two-thirds has been 
finished, but even now the .Board makes any estimate of probable 
cost with much hesitation. 

The Board acquired by taking, during the year, easements in 1.2 
acres of land in Dedham, for the construction of the Weliesley 
extension of the High-level sewer. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



29 



(4) South Metropolitan Sewerage System — Maintenance. 
The entire cost of maintenance of the South Metropolitan System 
during the past year was $131,929.28. 

Sewers and Pumping Stations. 

The Metropolitan sewers in the South Metropolitan System, 
which comprise the old Charles River valley sewer and Neponset 
River valley sewer, as well as the new High-level sewer and exten- 
sions, have a total length of 49.069 miles, and with these are con- 
nected local sewers having a length of 653.17 miles, involving 45,149 
connections. 

The pumping stations operated for the South Metropolitan Sewer- 
age System are as follows : — 







Number 

of 
Engines. 


Contract 

Capacity per 

Day 

(Gallons). 


Lift 

(Feet). 


Ward Street station (Roxbury District), .... 

Quincy station, . . . . . . . 

Quincy sewerage lifting station, . . . . 


2 
3 

2 


100,000,000 

18,000,000 

3,000,000 


45 
28 
20 





The sewage of two small areas in Dorchester and Milton, included 
in the Neponset River valley system, which are too low for sewage 
to be delivered into the High-level sewer by gravity, is, under an 
arrangement with the city of Boston, disposed of through the Boston 
Main Drainage Works at Moon Island. By this arrangement the 
Board is relieved from the expense of providing extra pumping 
facilities. 

A large part of the sewage of the South District is lifted into 
the High-level sewer at the Ward Street pumping station in Rox- 
bury. Most of the sewage of the city of Quincy is pumped into 
the High-level sewer at Greenleaf Street near the Quincy pumping 
station. All of the sewage of the South District is screened at the 
Nut Island screen-house for the purpose of intercepting solid matter, 
and is thence discharged at the bottom of the harbor from the out- 
falls about a mile off the island. 

The daily average amount of sewage thus discharged was 60,200,- 
000 gallons, and the largest rate of discharge in a single day was 
during a heavy storm, when the amount reached 162,000,000 gal- 
lons. The decrease in the daily average from last year was 1,800,000 



30 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

gallons. The daily average discharge of sewage for each individual 
contributing sewage in the district was 176 gallons. 

There were 2,890 gross tons of bituminous coal and 50 tons of 
anthracite screenings purchased at the two pumping stations and 
the Nut Island screen-house, the average prices of which varied from 
$6.90 to $10.60 per gross ton for the bituminous coal delivered in the 
bins. The screenings were purchased for $6.72 per ton. 

The total amount expended for the operation of the stations was 
$72,876.51. 

VII. SEWERAGE WORKS — FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 

The financial abstract of the receipts, expenditures, disbursements, 
assets and liabilities of the Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board 
for the fiscal year of the Commonwealth ending with November 
30, 1917, was, as stated in connection with the Water Works, pre- 
sented to the General Court in January, in accordance with the 
requirements of chapter 235 of the Acts of the year 1906, and a 
copy of this financial abstract is in part printed as Appendix No. 5. 

The following statement of its financial doings, in relation to the 
Metropolitan Sewerage Works, for the calendar year 1917 is here- 
with presented, in accordance with the provisions of the act of 1906, 
as a part of the annual report of the Board. 

(1) Metropolitan Sewerage Loans, Receipts and Payments. 
The loans authorized for the construction of the Metropolitan 
Sewerage Works, the receipts which are added to the proceeds of 
these loans, the expenditures for construction, and the balances 
available on January 1, 1918, have been as follows: — 

North Metropolitan System. 
Loans authorized under various acts to January 1, 1918, for the 
construction of the North Metropolitan System and the 

various extensions, $7,521,365 73 

Receipts from sales of real estate and from miscellaneous sources 

which are placed to the credit of the North Metropolitan 

System : — 

For the year ending December 31, 1917, . . $271 38 

For the period prior to January 1, 1917, . . 85^,718 11 

85,989 49 

$7,598,355 22 

Amount carried forward, $7,598,355 22 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 31 

Amount brought forward, $7,598,355 22 

Amount approved for payment by the Board x out of the Metro- 
politan Sewerage Loan Fund, North System : — 
For the year ending December 31, 1917, .. . $36,585 93 
For the period prior to January 1, 1917, . . 7,256,702 34 

7,293,288 27 

Balance, North Metropolitan System, January 1, 1918, . $305,066 95 

South Metropolitan System. 
Loans authorized under the various acts, prior to 1917, applied to 
the construction of the Charles River valley sewer, Neponset 
valley sewer, High-level sewer and extensions, constituting 

the South Metropolitan System, $9,262,046 27 

Loan authorized under General Acts of 1917, chapter 285 (for 
completing the extension of the Metropolitan Sewer to the 

Town of Wellesley), 325,00000 

Receipts from pumping, sales of real estate and from miscella- 
neous sources, which are placed to the credit of the South 
Metropolitan System : — 
For the year ending December 31, 1917, . . $83 88 

For the period prior to January 1, 1917, . . 19,300 45 

19,384 33 



$9,606,430 60 



Amount approved by the Board for payment out of the Met- 
ropolitan Sewerage Loan Fund, South System : — 
On account of the Charles River valley sewer, . $800,046 27 
On account of the Neponset valley sewer, . . 911,53146 
On account of the High-level sewer and exten- 
sions, including Wellesley extension: — 
For the year ending December 

31, 1917, . . ... . $244,746 05 

For the period prior to January 

1, 1917, . . . . . 7,407,403 85 

7,652,149 90 



9,363,727 63 

Balance, South Metropolitan System, January 1, 1918, . $242,702 97 

1 The word "Board" refers to the Metropolitan Sewerage Commission and the Metropolitan Water 
and Sewerage Board. 



32 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

(2) Total Sewerage Debt, December 31, 1917. 

North Metropolitan System. 
Bonds issued by the Treasurer of the Commonwealth : — 

Sinking fund bonds (3 and 3£ per cent.), $6,563,000 00 

Serial bonds (3| and 4 per cent.), 925,500 00 

• 

Total bond issue to December 31, 1917, $7,488,500 00 

Serial bonds paid prior to January 1, 1917, . . $48,500 00 

Serial bonds paid in 1917, 26,500 00 

75,000 00 



Total bond issue outstanding December 31, 1917, . . . $7,413,500 00 

Gross Sewerage Debt, $7,413,500 00 

Sinking fund December 31, 1917, 2,475,165 88 

Net Sewerage Debt December 31, 1917, $4,938,334 12 

A net increase for the year of $67,389.87. 

South Metropolitan System. 
Bonds issued by the Treasurer of the Commonwealth : — 

Sinking fund bonds (3 and 3§ per cent.), $8,877,912 00 

Serial bonds (4 per cent.), 395,000 00 



Total bond issue to December 31, 1917, $9,272,912 00 

Serial bonds paid prior to January 1, 1917, . . $10,000 00 

Serial bonds paid in 1917, 11,000 00 

21,000 00 



Total bond issue outstanding December 31, 1917, . . . $9,251,912 00 

Gross Sewerage Debt, $9,251,912 00 

Sinking fund December 31, 1917, 1,450,626 87 

Net Sewerage Debt December 31, 1917, $7,801,285 13 

A decrease for the year of $101,025.35. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



33 



(3) Noeth and South Metropolitan Loan and Sinking Funds, 

December 31, 1917. 





Loi 


INS. 


Bonds issued 
(Sinking Fund). 


Bonds issued 
(Seeial Bonds). 


Sinking 
Fund. 


Yeah. 


















North 
System. 


South 
System. 


North 
System. 


South 
System. 


North 
System. 


South 
System. 


North and 
South 

Systems. 


1889, . 


$5,000,000 00 


- 


- 


- 


■ - 


- 


- 


1890, 




- 


- 


$2,200,000 


$800,000 


- 


- 


- 


1891, 




- 


- 


368,000 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1892, 




- 


- 


1,053,000 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1893, 




- 


- 


579,000 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1894, 




500,000 00 


- 


500,000 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1895, 




300,000 00 


$500,000 00 


300,000 


300,000 


- 


- 


- 


1896, 




30,000 00 


- 


30,000 


200,000 


- 


- 


- 


1897, 




85,000 00 


300,000 00 


80,000 


300,000 


- 


- 


- 


1898, 




215,000 00 


35,000 00 


220,000 


35,000 


- 


- 


- 


1899, 




- 


4,625,000 00 


- 


1,025,000 


- 


- 


$361,416 59 


1900, 




265,000 00 


10,912 00i 


265,000 


10,912 


- 


- 


454,520 57 


1901, 




- 


40,000 00 


- 


2,040,000 


- 


- 


545,668 26 


1902, 




- 


- 


- 


864,000 


- 


- 


636,084 04 


1903, 




500,000 00 


1,000,000 00 


500,000 


1,736,000 


- 


- 


754,690 41 


1904, 




- 


392,000 00 


- 


392,000 


- 


- 


878,557 12 


1905, 




- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1,008,724 95 


1905, 




55,000 00 


1,175,000 00 


55,000 


175,000 


- 


- 


1,146,998 68 


1907, 




- 


- 


- 


300,000 




- 


1,306,850 30 


1908, 




413,000 00 


- 


- 


700,000 


- 


- 


1,492,418 98 


1909, 




- 


- 


300,000 


- 


- 


- 


1,673,784 40 


1910, 




56,000 00 


- 


113,000 


- 


- 


- 


1,931,741 89 


1911, 




6,000 00 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2,184,674 98 


1912, 




378,000 00 


- 


- 


- 


$62,000 


- 


2,458,541 20 


1913, 




- 


- 


. - 


- 


378,000 


- 


2,749,337 90 


1914, 




130,500 00 


350,000 00 


- 


- 


- 


- 


3,011,512 44 


1915, 




83,000 00 


5,000 00 


- 


- 


130,500 


- 


3,290,979 46 


1916, 




285,000 00 


40,000 00 


- 


- 


70,000 


$355,000 


3,604,657 27 


1917, 




- 


325,000 00 


- 


- 


285,000 


40,000 


3,925,792 75 




$8,301,500 002 


$8,797,912 00 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 




789,134 27 


789,134 27 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 






$7,512,365 73 


$9,587,046 27 


$6,563,000 


$8,877,912 


$925,500 


$395,000 


- 



1 The sum of $10,912 was appropriated to reimburse the town of Watertown for the expense of con- 
structing the Watertown siphon. 

2 Of this amount $789,134.27 was expended for the construction of the Charles River valley sewer, which 
is now included in the South Metropolitan System. 



34 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



(4) Annual Appropriations, Receipts and Expenditures. 

The annual appropriations for the maintenance of the Metropoli- 
tan Sewerage Works, the receipts of the Board which are added to 
the appropriations for maintenance, and the expenditures for main- 
tenance for the year ending December 31, 1917, were as follows: — 



North Metropolitan System. 
Appropriations as follows : — 

Chapter 99, Special Acts of 1917, . 

Chapter 322, Special Acts of 1917, 

Chapter 343, General Acts of 1917, 

Chapter 374, Special Acts of 1917, 
Receipts from pumping and from other sources, 

Amount approved by the Board for payment, 
Balance, January 1, 1918, . . . . 

South Metropolitan System , 
Appropriations as follows : — 

Chapter 100, Special Acts of 1917, 

Chapter 343, General Acts of 1917, 

Chapter 374, Special Acts of 1917, 
Receipts from pumping and from other sources, 

Amount approved by the Board for payment, 

Balance, January 1, 1918, 



$195,000 00 

1,000 00 

2,500 00 

10,500 00 

250 41 



$209,250 41 


196,469 71 


$12,780 70 


$125,000 00 


2,500 00 


6,500 00 


301 28 


$134,301 28 


131,929 28 



$2,372 00 



(5) Sewer Assessments, 1917. 
The following sewer assessments were made by the Treasurer of 
the Commonwealth upon the various municipalities: — 



North Metropolitan Sewerage System. 

Sinking fund requirements, . 

Serial bonds, 

Interest, 

Maintenance: — 

Appropriated by Legislature, $209,000 00 

Less balance on hand, 16,027 22 



Total North Metropolitan sewerage assessment, 



$114,807 52 

21,606 00 

227,005 76 



192,972 78 
$556,392 06 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



35 



South Metropolitan Sewerage System. 

Sinking fund requirements, $71,331 29 

Serial bonds, 9,389 20 

Interest, 309,228 23 

Maintenance: — 

Appropriated by Legislature, $134,000 00 

Less balance on hand, 4,845 36 

129,154 64 

Total South Metropolitan sewerage assessment, . . . $519,103 36 

In accordance with the provisions of chapter 369, Acts of 1906, 
the proportion to be paid by each city and town to meet the interest 
and sinking fund requirements for each year is based upon their 
respective taxable valuations, and to meet the cost of maintenance 
and operation upon their respective populations. 

The divisions of the assessments for 1917 were as follows: — 

North Metropolitan Sewerage System. 



Cities and Towns. 


Assessment. 


Cities and Towns. 


Assessment. 


Boston, . . . . 
Cambridge, 


$16,274 29 
10,493 59 
86,378 26 

119,189 91 
32,918 90 
32,246 34 
5,617 61 
43,253 88 
29,056 20 
17,657 22 


Revere 

Somerville 

Wakefield, 

Winchester, 

Total, 


$5,051 52 
21,904 50 
74,814 24 
6,121 29 
11,819 32 
14,946 29 
14,162 24 
14,486 46 


Melrose, 


$556,392 06 



1 Reading is also assessed $7,000 for sinking fund requirements in accordance with section 5, chapter 
159, General Acts of 1916. 



South Metropolitan Sewerage System. 



Cities and Towns. 


Assessment. 


CrriES and Towns. 


Assessment. 




$235,799 31 
98,199 48 
11,858 16 
21,585 77 
62,161 76 


Total, 


$35,572 23 
26,182 68 
16,825 40 
10,918 57 




$519,103 36 



1 Wellesley is also assessed $6,775.24 for sinking fund requirements in accordance with section 5, chapter 
343, Acts of 1914. 



36 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



(6) Expenditures for the Different Works. 
The following is a summary of the expenditures made in the vari- 
ous operations for the different works : — 



Construction and Acquisition of Works. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1917. 



North Metropolitan System. 
North System, enlargement: — 

Administration, 

Deer Island Outfall extension, .... 
Removal of old Maiden River siphon, . 
Reading extension, 



Amount charged from beginning of work to January 1, 1917, 
Total for North Metropolitan System to January 1, 1918, 

South Metropolitan System. 
High-level sewer extensions: — 

Administration, 

Relief Outfall, Section 43 

Wellesley extension: — 

Section 98, 

Section 99, 

Section 100 

Section 101, 

Section 102, 

Section 103, 

Section 104, 

Section 105, 

Section 106, 

Real estate settlements, 

Legal, conveyancing and expert, 

Payments under Industrial Accident Law and special 
benefit appropriations, 



Additions to Ward Street pumping station plant, . 

Amount charged from beginning of work to January 1, 1917, 
Total for South Metropolitan System to January 1, 1918, 
Total for construction, both systems, . 



$2,425 54 




28,561 87 




1,052 86 




4,545 66 






$36,585 93 






7,256,702 34 




$7,293,288 27 



$145,249 20 

2,292 18 

1,721 71 

2,529 74 

52,178 05 

6,934 98 

11,980 70 

114 14 

584 16 

4,000 00 

326 02 

98 00 



$3,620 85 
200 00 



228,008 88 
12,916 32 



$244,746 05 
9,118,981-58 

$9,363,727 63 

$16,657,015 90 



Maintenance and Operation. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1917. 



North Metropolitan System, 
South Metropolitan System, 



Total for maintenance, both systems, 



$196,469 71 
131,929 28 

$328,398 99 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



37 



(7) Detailed Financial Statement. 

The Board herewith presents, in accordance with the Metropolitan 
Sewerage acts, an abstract of the expenditures and disbursements, re- 
ceipts, assets and liabilities for the year ending December 31, 1917: — 



(a) Expenditures and Disbursements. 



General Character op Expenditures. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1917. 



Construction of Works and Acquisition by Purchase or Taking. 
North System Enlargement. 
Administration: — 

Commissioners, . . 

Secretary, 

Clerks and stenographers, 

Stationery, printing,and office supplies, 

Telephone, lighting, heating, water and care of building, . 

Rent and taxes, main office, 

Engineering: — 

Chief engineer, . 

Engineering assistants, 

Inspectors, . . "•• . . . 

Traveling expenses, 

Stationery, printing and office supplies 

Engineering and drafting instruments and tools, 

Engineering and drafting supplies, . . . . 

Telephone, lighting, heating, water and care of building, .... 

Rent and taxes, 

Miscellaneous expenses, 

Tools, machinery and appliances, r 

Brick, cement, lumber and other field supplies and expenses, 

Contracts: — 
George M. Bryne, Contract 131, for constructing Section 1A of the Deer 

Island Temporary Outfall sewer extension, 

Roy H. Beattie Inc., Contract 135, for constructing Section 1 of the Deer 

Island Outfall sewer extension in Boston Harbor, 

Real estate: — 
Legal, conveyancing and expert, 

Total for North Metropolitan System, 



$1,166 67 


375 00 


508 16 


138 33 


136 41 


100 97 


$625 01 


6,675 84 


1,128 81 


141 08 


110 22 


6 70 


92 38 


409 26 


302 93 


325 88 


$46 55 


365 83 



$7,167 49 
16,752 41 



$10 00 



$2,425 54 



9,818 11 



412 



23,919 90 



10 00 



$36,585 93 



38 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



General Character of Expenditures. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1917. 



South Metropolitan System. 
Administration: - High-level Sewer Extensions. 

Commissioners, . 

Secretary, 

Clerks and stenographers, 

Stationery, printing and office supplies, 

Telephone, lighting, heating, water and care of building 

Repairs of building 

Rent and taxes, main office 

Miscellaneous expenses 

Engineering: — 

Chief engineer, 

Engineering assistants 

Inspectors 

Traveling expenses, 

Engineering and drafting instruments and tools, 

Stationery, printing and office supplies, 

Engineering and drafting supplies, 

Telephone, lighting, heating, water and care of building, . 

Repairs of building, 

Rent and taxes, main office, 

Miscellaneous expenses, 

Advertising, 

Labor and teaming, 

Tools, machinery and appliances, 

Brick, cement, lumber and other field supplies and expenses, • . 

Contracts: — 
Bay State Dredging and Contracting Co., Contract 133, for constructing 

Section 104 of the High-level sewer (Wellesley extension) in Needham, 
Bruno & Petitti, Contract 134, for constructing Section 103 of the High-level 

sewer (Wellesley extension) in Needham, i 

Bruno & Petitti, Contract 143, for constructing Section 102 of the High-level 

sewer (Wellesley extension) in Needham, 

George M. Bryne, under agreement dated October 23, 1916, for constructing 

Section 98 of the High-level sewer (Wellesley extension) in West Rox- 

bury and Dedham 

George M. Bryne, under agreement dated October 6, 1917, for constructing 

Section 99 (in part) of the High-level sewer (Wellesley extension) in 

Dedham, 

D. M. Dillon Steam Boiler Works, Contract 136, for furnishing two vertical 

fire tube boilers for the Ward Street pumping station of the South 

Metropolitan Sewerage System in Roxbury, 

W. H. Ellis & Son Co., Contract 120, for constructing part of Section 43, 

Relief Outfall line of the High-level sewer in Boston Harbor, 

Payments under Industrial Accident Law and special benefit appropriations, 

Real estate : — 

Legal, conveyancing and expert 

Settlements, 

Total for South Metropolitan System, 



$1,166 66 


375 00 


1,435 62 


324 30 


173 81 


25 


144 21 


1 00 


$416 67 


6,705 19 


8,176 76 


762 51 


18 95 


187 06 


122 76 


521 53 


75 


432 75 


618 52 


$66 40 


4,575 43 


4,550 43 


5,773 76 


$10,784 99 


5,501 25 


42,982 61 



133,459 44 



1,683 42 



1,620 85 



17,963 45 



14,966 02 



9,160 00 
200 00 


203,771 71 
98 00 

4,326 02 


$98 00 


$326 02 
4,000 00 






$244,746 05 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



39 



General Character of Expenditures. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1917. 



Maintenance and Operation op Works 
North Metropolitan System. 
Administration: — 

Commissioners 

Secretary and assistants, 

Rent, . . 

Heating, lighting and care of building, 

Repairs of building, . 

Postage, 

Printing, stationery and office supplies, 

Telephones, . 

Miscellaneous expenses, 

General supervision: — 

Chief engineer and assistants 

Rent, 

Heating, lighting and care of building, 
Repairs of building, . . . . . 
Printing, stationery and office supplies, 

Telephones, 

Miscellaneous expenses, ....... 

Deer Island pumping station: — 

Labor . 

Fuel, 

Oil and waste, 

Water, 

Packing, . . 

Repairs and renewals, 

Telephones, 

General supplies, 

Miscellaneous supplies and expenses, . . .- . 

East Boston pumping station: — 

Labor, 

Fuel, 

Oil and waste, 

Water, . . . 

Packing, - . 

Repairs and renewals, 

Telephones, 

General supplies, 

Miscellaneous supplies and expenses, .... 

Charlestown pumping station: — 

Labor, . 

Fuel, 

Oil and waste, 

Water, . . . • . . ... 

Packing, 

Repairs and renewals, . .... 

Amounts carried forward, 



$2,708 33 

2,569 05 

259 65 

288 75 

5 50 

60 00 

430 64 

42 43 

30 05 



5,088 29 
778 95 
866 36 
16 50 
87 01 
127 32 
- 6 50 



$21,372 09 

17,517 71 

431 23 

1,657 20 

98 34 

973 09 

25 75 

632 01 

742 41 



$21,991 56 

19,453 35 

705 04 

1,570 80 

93 27 

1,053 69 

3 25 

336 69 

244 33 



$18,064 14 

8,003 08 

213 62 

957 12 

47 43 

310 59 



5,394 40 



7,970 93 



43,449 83 



45,451 98 



$27,595 98 $103,267 14 



40 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



General Character of Expenditures. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1917. 



Amounts brought forward, 

North Metropolitan System — Con. 
Charlestown pumping station — Con. 

Telephones, 

General supplies, 

Miscellaneous supplies and expenses, 

Alewife Brook pumping station: — 

Labor, 

Fuel 

Oil and waste, 

Water, 

Packing, 

Repairs and renewals, 

Telephones, 

General supplies, 

Miscellaneous supplies and expenses, 

Sewer lines, buildings and grounds: — 

Engineering assistants, 

Labor, 

Brick, cement and lime, 

Castings, ironwork and metals, 

Freight, express and teaming, 

Fuel and lighting, 

Jobbing and repairing, 

Lumber, 

Machinery, tools and appliances, 

Paints and oils, 

Rubber and oiled goods, 

Telephones, 

Traveling expenses, 

General supplies, 

Miscellaneous expenses, 

Horses, vehicles and stable account, 

Payments under Industrial Accident Law and special benefit appropriations, 
Investigation Sucker Brook Sewer (ch. 322, Acts of 1917), . 

Total for North Metropolitan System 

South Metropolitan System. 
Administration: — 

Commissioners, 

Secretary and assistants, 

Rent, • 

Heating, lighting and care of building, 

Repairs of building, 

Postage, 

Printing, stationery and office supplies, 

Amount carried forward, . . . 



$27,595 98 $103,267 14 



47 87 




375 81 




181 96 






28,201 62 




$9,057 81 




4,283 61 




172 18 




175 08 




21 31 




299 89 




28 06 




71 61 




65 32 






14,174 87 




$2,100 00 




34,454 91 




753 14 




607 52 




10 00 




64 10 




154 38 




1,155 09 




258 90 




421 82 




318 33 




37 50 




854 29 




1,013 21 




43 65 






42,246 84 






4,437 48 




3,143 00 




998 76 




$196,469 71 



$1,541 67 

2,331 23 

187 52 

199 94 

5 50 

50 00 

312 97 

$4,628 83 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



41 



General Character of Expenditures. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1917. 



Amount brought forward 

South Metropolitan System — Con. 
Administration — Con. 

Telephones, 

Traveling expenses, 

Miscellaneous expenses 

General supervision: — 
Chief engineer and assistants, .... 

Rent 

Heating, lighting and care of building, 

Repairs of building, 

Printing, stationery and office supplies, 

Postage, 

Telephones, 

Traveling expenses 

Miscellaneous expenses, . " . 

Ward Street pumping station: — 

Labor, 

Fuel 

Oil and waste, 

Water, 

Packing, . . . 

Repairs and renewals, . . 

Telephones, 

General supplies, 

Miscellaneous supplies and expenses, . 

Quincy pumping station: — 

Labor, 

Fuel, 

Oil and waster 

Water, . . . ... 

Packing, 

Repairs and renewals, 

Telephones, 

General supplies, 

Miscellaneous supplies and expenses, . 

Nut Island screen-house: — 

Labor, 

Fuel 

Oil and waste, 

Water, 

Packing, 

Repairs and renewals, 

Telephones, 

General supplies, 

Miscellaneous supplies and expenses, . 

Amount carried forward, . . . 



$4,628 83 



20 60 
15 25 
27 35 



$5,133 36 

562 58 

599 94 

16 50 

279 73 

10 00 

61 83 

50 00 

1 25 



$24,568 93 

14,670 33 

315 45 

1,536 00 

345 02 

1,973 86 

, 45 31 

1,289 72 

164 91 



59,112 41 

2,172 56 

76 62 

295 85 

25 47 

137 90 

27 37 

394 72 

55 39 



$9,237 35 

4,908 03 

125 90 

511 82 

26 75 

173 50 

33 44 

583 79 

68 11 



$4,692 03 



6,715 19 



44,909 53 



12,298 29 



15,668 69 
$84,283 73 



42 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



General Character of Expenditures. 



For the Year ending 
December 31 1917. 



Amount brought forward, 

South Metropolitan System — Con. 
Sewer lines, buildings and grounds: — 

Engineering assistants 

Labor, 

Automobiles, 

Brick, cement and lime, 

Castings, ironwork and metals, .... 

Fuel and lighting, 

Freight, express and teaming, .... 

Jobbing and repairing, 

Lumber, 

Machinery, tools and appliances, .... 

Paints and oils, 

Rubber and oiled goods 

Sand, gravel and stone, 

Telephones, . . 

Traveling expenses, ..;... 

General supplies, 

Miscellaneous expenses, 

City of Boston, for pumping, 

Horses, vehicles and stable account, 

Total for South Metropolitan System, 



$84,283 73 



$3,925 00 




26,793 00 




556 94 




759 60 




252 22 




403 05 




90 00 




15 10 




1,934 25 




141 06 




219 71 




162 48 




186 92 




24 58 




636 73 




365 11 




553 24 






37,018 99 
7,407 52 






3,219 04 




$131,929 28 



(b) Receipts. 

The receipts from the sales of property, from rents and from other 
sources, have been credited as follows : — 



Account. 



For the 

Year ending 

December 31, 

1917. 



Construction: — 

North Metropolitan System, 

South Metropolitan System, 

Maintenance: — 

North Metropolitan System 

South Metropolitan System, 

Sinking fund: — 

North Metropolitan System, 

South Metropolitan System, 

Interest fund: — 

North Metropolitan System 

South Metropolitan System, 

Amount credited from beginning of work to January 1, 1917, 
Total receipts to January 1, 1918, .... 



$271 38 
83 88 

250 41 
301 28 

116 65 
8,045 00 

29 32 
31 78 



$9,129 70 
129,649 10 



$138,778 80 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



43 



(c) Assets. 

The following is an abstract of the assets of the Sewerage Works, 
a complete schedule of which is kept on file in the office of the 
Board : — 

Office furniture, fixtures and supplies; engineering and scientific instruments 
and supplies; horses, vehicles, field machinery, etc.; machinery, tools and 
other appliances and supplies; completed works, real estate connected there- 
with. 

(d) Liabilities. 

There are bills for current expenses which have not yet been 

received. 

Amounts on Monthly Estimates, not due until Completion of Contracts or until 

Claims are settled. 



Name. 


Work. 


Amount. 


High-level sewer extensions : — . 






Timothy J. O'Connell, . 


Contract 57, Section 82, in part, .... 


$60 00 


Bruno & Petitti, .... 


Contract 143, Section 102, Wellesley extension, 


9,912 21 


North System enlargement: — 






Roy H. Beattie, Inc., 


Contract 135, Section 1, Deer Island Outfall sewer 
extension. 


6,581 09 



Settlements are pending with the following parties for easements 
taken in lands owned by them : — 

F. Murray Forbes, Hugh D. Scott, Charles H. Harmon, Clifford 
M. Locke, Martha W. Burrage, Needham Tire Co., Anne Williams, 
John Wells Farley, I. Tucker Burr, Jr., Edward and Catherine 
Bingham, Hannah Bingham, Katherine H. Rooney, Mary A. Read, 
J. Austin Amory, Hannah E. Pond, Richard G. Wadsworth, Charles 
Philip Beebe, John T. Morse, Jr., Mary A. Sidney, Frank D. Chase, 
Devisees of Anna E. Chase, Stephen M. Weld. 



VIII. RECOMMENDATIONS FOR LEGISLATION. 

In the abstract of the annual report for the year 1917 the Board 
made the following statement and recommendations : — 

On account of the high price of labor and materials, resulting from the un- 
usual business conditions that have prevailed during the past year, a large 



44 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

portion of the construction work already authorized has been deferred with the 
hope of carrying out the projects under more favorable conditions. 

There is a balance of $4,000 now remaining from the appropriation of $600,- 
000 authorized by chapter 694 of the Acts of 1912 for the purchase of certain 
property from the City of Boston; and in view of the uncertainty regarding the 
cost of construction work at the present time and the possibility that new ex- 
penditures may be required for the East Boston service, the Board recommends 
that authority be given to use this balance for such new expenditures and for 
the increased cost of constructing a line for the transmission of electricity be- 
tween the power station at the Wachusett Dam in Clinton and the power station 
at the Sudbury Dam in Southborough; to relocate and connect meters for the 
measuring of water supplied through the low service to the Metropolitan Water 
District; to construct a 12-inch pipe line in Poplar Street, West Roxbury, and 
under the Neponset River; and to install a new pumping engine at the Arlington 
pumping station, authorized under chapter 172 of the General Acts of the year 
1916, due to the present increase in cost of labor and materials. 

The original estimate for the construction of the Wellesley extension, High- 
level sewer, of $350,000, was made by the State Board of Health, and was based 
on a report submitted by an engineer called in by that department to make a 
survey and estimate. Two lines were considered by the Board of Health. The 
estimate was made on the shorter line which came through the location of the 
Brookline Water Works fields. This line was to connect with the existing 
Neponset Valley sewer of the High-level System at a point where the sewer has 
a capacity suitable only for the original district for which it was built. 

Because of the small size of this existing metropolitan sewer and the fact 
that this line extended across the Brookline Water Works fields and would in- 
terfere with this important supply, and also because of the fact that there is a 
rapidly growing portion of Dedham in the vicinity of Bridge Street, which is 
a part of the Metropolitan District and has no possible means of reaching the 
metropolitan system except by construction work by the Metropolitan Water 
and Sewerage Board, it was decided to use the alternate line proposed by the 
State Board of Health. This is somewhat longer but reaches the existing 
metropolitan sewer at a point where the latter is of increased size and at the 
same time furnishes a means of outlet for the above-named portion of Dedham 
and obviates the difficulties in connection with our construction in the fields 
of the Brookline Water Works. 

The Board has also designed a sewer of considerably larger capacity than was 
anticipated by the State Board of Health, feeling that the same is justified by 
the future demands of the District. 

The line adopted has a length of about 40,000 feet, almost wholly through 
private lands. It has been divided into sections numbered from 98 to 106, 
inclusive. At the present time sections 102, 103, 104, 105 and 106 are wholly 
completed. Section 98 is under construction and nearly' completed. 

The natural physical conditions of this part of the Charles River valley make 
sewer construction very expensive. This is occasioned by the large amount of 
rock encountered and by fine sands and other material in which it is expensive 
to construct and by the remoteness of the location. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



45 



Because of the above-stated conditions, namely, insufficiency of the original 
appropriation, not based on estimates made by the Metropolitan Water and 
Sewerage Board, and the necessary changes in the location to fit the needs of 
the District, the bad material encountered and, above all, the abnormal con- 
ditions of the market in regard to labor and supplies, it is necessary that an 
additional appropriation be asked for to complete the work. 

Following is the cost of the completed sections with an estimate of the cost 
of the remaining ones : — 



Section. 



Cost. 



Length (Feet). 



f 80 per cent, completed, . 
98 \ 

[ 20 per cent, to be completed, 

99, 

100, 

101, 

102, 

103, 

104, 

105, 

106, 

Administration, land damages and engineering to date, 

Total cost accrued and estimated, . . 



$157,000 
40,0001 
149,0001 
110,0001 
80,000i 
81,000 
45,900 
74,000 
44,000 
43,600 
36,000 



$860,500 



3,350 

3,300 
3,700 
3,950 
6,851 
5,916 
4,300 
4,425 
4,355 



40,147 



i Estimated. 



showing that the probable cost of construction work on this line will amount to 
$860,500, including engineering and incidentals. To this must be added the 
cost of land damage and any settlements of outstanding claims by contractors. 
The Board, therefore, asks for an additional appropriation of $200,000. 

The Legislature of 1916 appropriated $285,000 for the purpose of connecting 
the town of Reading with the North Metropolitan Sewerage System. During 
the past year estimates were obtained from trustworthy contractors of the 
expense of constructing a portion of this line. These estimates made it evident 
that under present conditions the amount of $285,000 appropriated by the 
Legislature for this purpose would be entirely insufficient to complete the work. 
An estimate has recently been made by a trustworthy contractor of the amount 
of money necessary to construct the whole of this sewer. This estimate is in 
round numbers $700,000. In the opinion of the Board it is not probable that 
any contractor of sufficient ability to complete the work will be willing to under- 
take it at a lower price. The Board, therefore, if the Legislature deems it wise 
to enter upon this work, asks for an additional appropriation of $415,000. In 
presenting this estimate the Board desires to add the expression of its opinion 
that any estimate made at this time may prove deceptive. 



46 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

The detailed reports of the Chief Engineer of the Water Works 
and of the Chief Engineer of the Sewerage Works, with various 
tables and statistics, are herewith presented. 

Respectfully submitted, 

henry p. walcott, 
edward a. Mclaughlin, 
thomas e. dwyer, 

Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board. 
Boston, February 27, 1918. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



47 



EEPOET OF CHIEF ENGINEER OF WATER WORKS. 



To the Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board. 

Gentlemen: — I have the honor to submit a report of the work 
done in connection with the construction, maintenance and operation 
of the Metropolitan Water Works for the year ended December 31, 
1917. 

Organization. 

The organization of the force employed under the direction of 
the Chief Engineer has remained the same as during the previous 
year. The principal assistants are as follows : — 



John L. Howard, . 
Elliot R. B. Allardice, 
Charles E. Haberstroh, 
Samuel E„ Killam, . 

Arthur E. O'Neil, . 

Alfred 0. Doane, . 

William W. Locke, 

Clifford Foss, . 

Benjamin F. Hancox, 
James W. Killam, . 

William E. Whittaker, 
Charles E. Livermore, 



Assistant to the Chief Engineer. 

Superintendent of Wachusett Department. 

Superintendent of Sudbury Department. 

Superintendent of Distribution Pipe Lines and 
Reservoirs. 

Superintendent of Distribution Pumping Sta- 
tions. 

Division Engineer, in charge of Mechanical 
Engineering and Inspection Work. 

Sanitary Inspector, in charge of Sanitary In- 
spection of Watersheds. 

Assistant Engineer, in charge of Distribution 
Civil Engineering. 

Head Draftsman, in charge of Drafting Force. 

Assistant Engineer, in charge of Coal and Oil 
Laboratory and compilation of Pumping 
Statistics. 

Office Assistant, in charge of General Office and 
compilation of Water Supply Statistics. 

Biologist, in charge of Microscopical and 
Bacteriological Examinations of the Water 
Supply. 



Including these principal assistants the number of supervising, 
engineering and clerical employees was 47 at the beginning of the 



48 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub, Doc. 



year. As a result of the unusual demands for engineers, clerks 
and stenographers, 15 experienced employees of this class resigned 
during the year to accept positions with increased compensation 
elsewhere, and one enlisted in the United States Navy. On account 
of the difficulty of replacing these employees under the existing 
conditions, seven of the vacancies had not been filled at the close 
of the vear. 

1/ 

In addition to the office forces, the labor forces engaged in main- 
taining and operating the reservoirs, aqueducts, pipe lines, hydro* 
electric stations and pumping stations and doing minor construction 
work have been as follows : — 



Department. 


Beginning 
of Year. 


End of 
Year. 


Maximum. 


Average. 


Sudbury, ........ 

Distribution, pipe lines and reservoirs, 
Distribution, pumping service, .... 


42 

57 
78 
56 


49 
82 
91 
61 


76 

95 

104 

63 


57 

78 
88 
61 




233 


283 


338 


284 



During the year 21 employees have been mustered into the United 
States service from the labor forces. 



CONSTRUCTION. 
Deferred Projects. 

On account of the high prices of labor and materials and lack of 
additional appropriation, the work of improving Beaver Dam Brook, 
which was authorized by chapter 814 of the Acts of the year 1913, 
and of laying a 12-inch pipe line in Poplar Street, West Roxbury, 
and under the Neponset River in Hyde Park, and a 16-inch pipe 
line in Arlington, authorized by chapter 172 of the General Acts 
of the year 1916, was not undertaken during the year. 

Proposals were received on June 15 for the 36-inch pipes and 
special castings required for laying the additional supply main in 
Chelsea for the East Boston low service, which was authorized by 
chapter 322 of the General Acts of the year 1917. Revised esti- 
mates, based on these proposals, showed that the cost of the pipe 
line would exceed the appropriation by about $5,640, and the work 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 49 

was not undertaken. Opportunity was taken/ however, during the 
year, in connection with the repaying of Williams Street by the 
city of Chelsea, to relay 170 linear feet of the 20-inch pipe line 
where it crosses over the 24-inch pipe line. This work has re- 
moved an objectionable crossing of the two existing supply mains 
and increased the reliability of the service. 

Wachusett-Sudbuey Powee Teansmission Line. 

During 1916 the preliminary engineering work in connection with 
the preparation of the plans for the Wachusett-Sudbury power trans- 
mission line was completed, and 177 chestnut poles 40 to 50 feet 
in length were cut on the water works lands for use in its construc- 
tion. The line will be used for furnishing electric energy to the 
New England Power Company and the Edison Electric Illuminating 
Company of Boston. These companies have contracted, jointly, to 
purchase all of the electric energy to be generated at the Wachusett 
power station for a period of ten years from the completion of the 
transmission line, which is being constructed from a point near the 
Wachusett power station in Clinton to a point near the Sudbury 
power station in Southborough. It is located on lands owned by 
the Commonwealth situated in the towns of Clinton, Berlin, North- 
borough and Southborough and the city of Marlborough, and in- 
cludes 15.59 miles of single circuit electric power transmission line 
for 3-phase, 66,000-volt alternating current, with two telephone con- 
ductors below the three power conductors for a distance of 15.25 
miles. Except for a distance of 840 feet, where a location was 
purchased in order to shorten the line about 1,300 feet, and an 
easement about 67 feet in length at the crossing of the New York, 
New Haven & Hartford Railroad in Southborough, the line is lo- 
cated on lands acquired for the construction of the Wachusett 
Aqueduct and the Sudbury Reservoir. The transmission line crosses 
the waste channel and the valley below the Wachusett Dam, the 
Assabet River beside the Wachusett Aqueduct bridge, the open 
channel portion of the Wachusett Aqueduct in two places, the Sud- 
bury Reservoir in three places, steam railways at four places and 
twenty-seven highways. 

On account of the advantage of following the aqueduct location 
which was already acquired and of the numerous highway, railroad, 
river and reservoir crossings, several types of construction w r ere 



50 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

necessary, including 14 steel towers, 12 double-pole structures, 34 
pull-off poles and 354 single poles. 

The steel towers were used at the three spans near the Wachusett 
Dam, at the steam railroad crossings and at the two long spans 
over the Sudbury Reservoir. They are made up of structural steel; 
ten of them are approximately 48 feet in height and 9 feet square 
at the base, and four are approximately 68 feet in height and 
12 feet square at the base. Chestnut poles from 40 to 55 feet in 
length were used for the remainder of the line, spaced about 200 
feet apart and standing from 34 feet to 47| feet in height above 
the ground. There are 412 chestnut poles in the entire line; 200 
of them were cut on water works land by the department forces 
and delivered to the contractor for use in the line without charge 
therefor. The department forces also cleared the location for the 
transmission line, where necessary, for a width of 50 feet and a total 
length of about 7 miles, and laid 605 linear feet of 2-inch Orange- 
burg fibre conduit easterly from the Wachusett power station for 
the underground telephone cables. 

At the crossings over the Assabet River and open channel, at 
several highways and at deflection angles over 30 degrees, double- 
pole structures were used. At most deflection angles of between 10 
and 30 degrees pull-off poles were used and at deflection angles of 
less than 10 degrees the regular single poles, properly guyed, were 
used. 

The power conductors are 3-strand, medium hard -drawn bare 
copper cables of No. 2 American wire gage, except for a distance 
of 1,594 feet for the three spans near the Wachusett Dam, where 
No. 00 American wire gage 7-strand cable is used, and the center 
strand is of soft copper. 

The long span at the Wachusett Dam is 984 feet and the two 
long spans over the Sudbury Reservoir are 685 feet and 753 feet, 
respectively. 

The telephone conductors are bare galvanized wire of No. 6 
Birmingham wire gage, except at the two long spans over the Sud- 
bury Reservoir where they are No. 4 Birmingham wire gage. 

One complete transposition of the power conductors is made by 
a one-third roll at three points in the line, and the telephone con- 
ductors are transposed at every fourth pole. 

The power line insulators are of porcelain for 66,000-volt service 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 51 

and are of the pin type on single-pole arms and pole-top brackets 
and of the suspension type on pull-off poles, double-pole structures 
and towers. The telephone line insulators are of porcelain for 
13,000-volt service. 

The regular cross-arms for the power conductors are 6 feet 6 
inches long, built up of two 4-inch galvanized structural steel chan- 
nels with the necessary plates and angles, and for the telephone 
conductors they are 3 feet long of 3j-inch x 4^-inch prime quality 
long-leaf yellow pine timber. 

The regular arrangement of the power conductors is in triangular 
formation spaced 6 feet apart on single poles and 10 feet apart at 
the steel towers. At highway crossings the lowest power conductor 
is at least 28 feet above the roadway and at least 8 feet above any 
cross wires. 

All poles were brush treated with two coats of creosote oil applied 
at a temperature of 150 degrees Fahrenheit at all scars, knots, 
gains, roofs and butts, and all wooden cross-arms and wooden 
anchors were treated all over in a similar manner. For a distance 
of 11 miles from the westerly end of the line the poles were treated 
for 2 feet above and 2 feet below the ground line with two coats of 
creosote oil, and for the remainder of the line the oil was omitted 
and the entire base of the poles was charred below a point 2 feet 
above the ground line, using large kerosene blow torches for this 
work. At every pole structure a galvanized steel ground cable f of 
an inch in diameter was coiled six times on the face of the butt, 
extended up the pole and connected with the power cross-arm and 
pole top pin. 

A contract was made July 28 with Fred T. Ley & Company, 
Incorporated, of Springfield, Mass., the lowest bidder for construct- 
ing the transmission line. Work was begun by the contractor 
September 10 and was continued until the end of the year. The 
force employed averaged about 25 men and 2 horses. 

The total expenditures for the transmission line to December 31, 
1917, amounted to $19,234.14. 

The work remaining to be done at the close of the year includes 
some field riveting on the steel towers, placing the insulators, string- 
ing the conductors and the final painting of the poles and towers. 

At the close of the year the New England Power Company had 
completed its 66,000-volt connecting line which extends about 1.7 



52 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

miles westerly from the westerly terminus of our line to the Com- 
pany's sub-station in Clinton. As this sub-station is already con- 
nected with the Wachusett power station by two 13, 200- volt lines 
no direct connection will be made between the new 66,000-volt line 
and the Wachusett power station, but a connection will be made 
with the Sudbury power station early in the spring. 

The connecting 66,000-volt line to be provided by the Edison 
Electric Illuminating Company of Boston will extend from the 
easterly terminus of our line for a distance of several miles to one 
of its sub-stations. As work had not been begun by the Company 
on its line at the close of the year work on our line will be sus- 
pended as soon as the riveting of the steel towers is completed 
and the remaining work will be deferred until the early spring. 

Additional Nokthern High-service Pipe Line and Pumping 

Machinery. 

The work of installing at the northern extra high-service pumping 
station in Arlington a steam turbine driven centrifugal pumping 
unit of a capacity of 3,000,000 gallons in 24 hours and a return 
tubular boiler 54 inches in diameter x 17 feet in length, provided 
for by chapter 172 of the General Acts of the year 1916, has been 
continued. Proposals for the pumping unijt were opened March 22, 
and after a careful examination of the propositions submitted a 
contract was made with F. A. Mazzur & Company of Boston to 
furnish and install for the sum of $9,000 a unit consisting of a steam 
turbine to be made by the Moore Steam Turbine Corporation of 
Wellsville, N. Y., centrifugal pumps to be made by the Allis- 
Chalmers Company of Milwaukee, Wis., and a horizontal cylindri- 
cal condenser of the water works type and a Wheeler-Edwards type 
air pump to be made by the Wheeler Condenser & Engine Company 
of Carteret, N. J. 

Owing to war-time conditions there has been considerable delay 
in delivering the machinery. The steam turbine was tested at the 
shop on October 1 and was delivered at the pumping station on 
October 25. The centrifugal pumps were tested at the shop on 
August 22, but owing to some minor changes necessary to comply 
with the specifications were not delivered at the pumping station 
until December 18. The condenser and air pump were inspected 
at the shop on December 19 and were snipped December 28, but 
had not been received at the end of the year. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 53 

The concrete foundation for the unit was constructed by the 
department forces and at the close of the year the contractor had 
set the turbine and pumps on the foundation but had not lined 
them up in final position. 

Pipes and fittings for the discharge and suction piping and for 
the new steam main were purchased and have been received, and a 
portion of the suction piping has been laid. 

A contract for making and delivering at the pumping station the 
boiler with smoke box, up-take extension of existing flue, cast-iron 
front and I beam supports was made with the New England Iron 
Works Company of South Boston on May 15 for the sum of $2,296. 

After considerable delay, due to the abnormal condition of the 
steel business, the contractor received the steel from the mill on 
October 4, and on account of further delay at the contractor's shop 
the boiler is only 80 per cent, completed at the end of the year. 

A 14-inch Coppus blower is to be installed with the new boiler 
and a 12-inch Coppus blower has been installed on one of the 
existing boilers to furnish forced draft, so that a large percentage 
of anthracite screenings may be burned at this station in the future. 

A Westinghouse locomotive-type air compressor, with steam cylin- 
der 9| inches in diameter and air cylinder 7§ inches in diameter 
and a stroke of 10 inches, Was installed for use in place of the large 
suction air chamber which it was necessary to remove to provide 
for the new suction piping. 

Plans for the proposed 16-inch pipe line to extend from the 
northern extra high-service stand-pipe in Arlington to the Lexington 
boundary line have been completed, but, owing to the continued 
high price of cast-iron pipe and special castings, the construction 
of this line has been again deferred until it can be done under 
more economical conditions. 

The expenditures for these improvements to December 31, 1917, 
amount to $7,637.00, of which $314.64 was for the pipe line and 
$7,322.36 for the pumping station. 

Meters and Connections. 
To provide for satisfactory operation of the supply mains acquired 
from the city of Boston in 1913, the work of relocating the Venturi 
meters and of making additional connections under the provisions 
of chapter 172 of the General Acts of the year 1916, which was 
begun in 1916, has been continued during the year 1917. 



54 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

The work of installing a 30-inch x 10-inch Venturi meter, 30-inch 
check valve and 12-inch blow-off connection in Perkins Street at 
the Boston-Somerville boundary line, which was suspended at the 
close of the year 1916 on account of the unfavorable weather, was 
resumed early in 1917 and the meter w r as put into service April 4. 
The blow-off pipe was laid and the entire work was completed 
during the following month. The total expenditure for all work 
at this place amounts to $2,895.18, including the expenditure made 
in 1916. 

In May and June the 48-inch x 22j-inch Venturi meter in the 
former Boston Water Works Beacon Street line near effluent gate- 
house No. 1 at Chestnut Hill Reservoir in Boston, was taken up, 
and after substituting an 18-inch throat section for the 22§-inch, 
the meter was installed in the Beacon Street main at St. Mary's 
Street in Brookline, at the Boston boundary line. A 48-inch check 
valve and a 12-inch blow-off connection were installed at this place 
and the 48-inch meter was put into service again on June 15. A 
36-inch gate valve and 48-inch manhole pipe were installed in the 
48-inch pipe line near effluent gate-house No. 1 at the point where 
the meter had been removed, and in connection with this work the 
interior surface of the 48-inch main was cleaned for a distance of 
325 feet and for a length of 50 feet was given two coats of red lead 
and linseed oil paint. The total expenditures for removing and re- 
locating the meter and doing all other work in connection there- 
with was $5,914.33. 

In June and July a 16-inch gate valve was set in the former 
Boston Water Works 24-inch main in Broadway, Somerville, at the 
Boston boundary line, and a 10-inch x 3f-inch Venturi meter, a 10- 
inch gate valve, 10-inch check valve and 8-inch blow-off connection 
w r ere installed on the by-pass around the 16-inch valve. The meter 
was put into service on July 18 but the blow-off pipe has not been 
connected with the sewer. The total expenditures for this work 
amount to $1,767.67. 

September 13 work was begun on the connection between the 
former 30-inch Boston Water Works main, the Metropolitan Water 
Works 48-inch main and the Boston Water Works 24-inch main in 
Perkins Street, at Prince Street in Boston, near the Brookline 
boundary line, and in connection with this work a 30-inch x 12-inch 
Venturi meter was moved from the old Brookline Reservoir grounds- 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 55 

on October 29 and installed at Perkins Street, so that it will meas- 
ure all of the water delivered to the city of Boston from both the 
30-inch and the 48-inch mains. A 30-inch check valve and 8-inch 
blow-off connection were also installed at this place. The meter 
was again placed in service on November 10 and the entire work 
was completed on December 4. The total expenditures for this 
work amount to $4,926.00. 

In August a branch pipe line was laid from the 30-inch low- 
service main near the old Mystic pumping station to the Alewife 
Brook Parkway in Somerville for supplying a small section of Somer- 
ville which is now supplied from the northern high-service. This 
line includes 143 feet of 24-inch pipe, 57 feet of 16-inch pipe and 
51 feet of 12-inch by-pass line, and a 6-inch x 3-inch Hersey de- 
tector meter was installed. The connecting line which is to be 
installed by the city of Somerville had not been laid at the close 
of the year. The total expenditures for the work amount to 
$2,768.83. 

MAINTENANCE. 

Rainfall and Yield of Wateesheds. 

The annual precipitation was below the average on all watersheds, 
being 37.26 inches on the Wachusett watershed as compared with 
an average of 44.91 inches for the past twenty-one years and a 
previous minimum of 37.83 inches in 1908; 41.51 inches on the 
Sudbury watershed as compared with an average of 44.60 inches 
for the past forty-three years, and 41.69 inches on the Cochituate 
watershed as compared with an average of 45.23 inches for the past 
fifty-five years. 

The monthly precipitation was above the average on all the 
watersheds during March, May, June, August and October, but 
there was a deficiency during the other months. The rainfall in July 
was the lowest shown by our records for this month on all water- 
sheds, and the rainfall on the Wachusett watershed in April was 
the same as in April, 1915, and lower than the April rainfall for 
any other year included in our records. 

The monthly yield from the Wachusett watershed was below the 
average except during May, June and October. The average yield 
for the year was 834,000 gallons per day per square mile, which is 
78.5 per cent, of the average for the past twenty-one years. The 
yield from the Sudbury watershed was 750,000 gallons per day per 



56 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



square mile, which is 76.5 per cent, of the average for the past 
forty-three years and 84.1 per cent, of the average for the past 
twenty years during which water has been discharged into the Sud- 
bury Reservoir from the Wachusett watershed. The yield from the 
Cochituate watershed was 786,000 gallons per day per square mile, 
which is 85.5 per cent, of the average for the past fifty-five years. 
During the year the city of Worcester turned 1,417,200,000 gal- 
lons of water into the Wachusett watershed from the 9.35 square 
miles formerly in this watershed which it took for its water supply 
in 1911, and by agreement the City is entitled to compensation from 
the Commonwealth for 207,800,000 gallons of this water which was 
delivered between June 15 and December 15. 

Storage Reservoirs. 

The capacities of the storage reservoirs of the Metropolitan Water 
Works, the elevation of the water surfaces and the quantity of 
water stored in each reservoir at the beginning and at the end of 
the year are shown by the following table: — 







Eleva- 
tion 1 

of 
High 

Water. 


Capacity 
(Gallons). 


Jan. 1, 1917. 


Jan. 1, 1918. 


Storage Reservoirs. 


Eleva- 
tion 1 
of 

Water 
Surface. 


Amount 

stored 

(Gallons). 


Eleva- 
tion 1 

of 

Water 

Surface. 


Amount 

stored 

(Gallons). 


Cochituate watershed : — 














Lake Cochituate, 2 . 


144.36 


2,097,100,000 


143.23 


1,830,100,000 


141.91 


1,524,600,000 


Sudbury watershed: — 














Sudbury Reservoir, 


260.00 


7,253,500,000 


258.49 


6,623,800,000 


257.52 


6,225,200,000 


Framingham Reservoir 

No. 1. 
Framingham Reservoir 

No. 2. 
Framingham Reservoir 

No. 3. 
Ashland Reservoir, 


169.32 
177.87 
186.74 
225.21 


289,900,000 3 
529,900,000 3 
1,180,000,000 3 
1,416,400,000 


167.70 
176.02 
183.53 

224.28 


216,100,000 

482,600,000 

942,300,000 

1,365,200,000 


167.71 
176.02 
183.25 
223.59 


216,500,000 

482,600,000 

920,300,000 

1,327,900,000 


Hopkinton Reservoir, 


305.00 


1,520,900,000 


304.07 


1,462,700,000 


303.30 


1,415,100,000 


Whitehall Reservoir, 


337.91 


1,256,900,000 


336.65 


1,013,300,000 


336.79 


1,040,000,000 


Farm Pond, 


159.25 


167,500,000 


157.39 


69,600,000 


157.75 


88,200,000 


Wachusett watershed: — 














Wachusett Reservoir, 


395.00 


64,968,000,000 


387.11 


54,679,600,000 


385.94 


53,225,600,000 


Totals, .... 


- 


80,680,100,000 


- 


68,685,300,000 


- 


66,466,000,000 



1 Elevation in feet above Boston City Base. 

2 Excluding Dudley Pond which was abandoned April 3, 1916. 



3 To top of flash-boards. 



QUANTITY OF WATER STORED IN THE WACHUSETT RESERVOIR 
AND IN ALL THE STORAGE RESERVOIRS COMBINED 
DURING 1917 

JAN. FEB MAR. APR. MAY JUN. JUL. AUG. SEP OCT MOV. DEC. 



82.000 



78,000 
76.000 
74.000 
72.000 
70.000 



c 
o 

CD 

O 



66,000 



64,000 



62.000 



60.000 



58,000 



56,000 



54.000 



5Z.000 



























'COMBINED LAFAL1I] 


OF ALL $!UhJ\(,t: 


zRESEkvuins .■ 


F.Ry. 














^ 








































































\ 














0)1 






















3 






















q:\1 

V) i 






















tu ] 
























tu j 
o4- 
























KjL 
























pi 
























-j j 
















\ 


A 


V\T\ 






















\ 


\ 


\ 




















\ 




V 




















V 


CAPAC 


V 

\TY 01 


7 WAC, 


iUSET 


T ^f 




y?f5i 


'RVOIR 


AT 


HIGH 


WAT Eh 


>v 














































































nl 






















>1 








\ 


\ 












tu/ 












\ 












oc 












\ 












K 












\ 


\ 










bJ 

col 














\ 










t) 1 














Kj 


*v; 


X 




*/. 


















\ 






















\ 

























82,000 



80,000 



78.000 



75.000 



74.000 



72.000 



70.000 



C 

o 



66.000 — 
O 



64.000 



c 
o 



62.000 zz 
2 



JAN. FEB. MAR APR MAY JUN. JUL AUG SEP OCT. NOV. DEC. 



58.000 



56000 



54000 



52.000 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 57 

The diagram facing page 56 shows the quantity of water stored 
in the Wachusett Reservoir and the quantity stored in all the storage 
reservoirs combined during the year. 

Wachusett Reservoir. — At the beginning of the year the Wachu- 
sett Reservoir contained 54,679,600,000 gallons of water and the 
surface of the water was at elevation 387.11, approximately 8 feet 
below high-water line. It subsided gradually and was at elevation 
384.97 on February 23. It then rose rapidly with the spring rains 
and thaws and was at elevation 393.46 on April 11. The reservoir 
continued to fill slowly and the water reached elevation 395 on 
May 13 and remained above this elevation until July 9, and be- 
tween May 28 and June -20, 1,473,900,000 gallons of water was 
wasted from the reservoir. The maximum rate at which water was 
wasted was 480,400,000 gallons per day on June 17 and 18. The 
highest stage reached by the water was elevation 395.55 on June 17. 
The reservoir then contained 65,710,900,000 gallons of water from 
which a steady draft for water supply was maintained until the 
end of the year, with the exception that no water was drawn be- 
tween October 27 and November 6, in order to permit the West- 
borough State Hospital to extend its 12-inch suction pipe up the 
open channel of the Wachusett Aqueduct to the terminal chamber 
and to allow the contractor for the Wachusett-Sudbury transmission 
line to set the poles along the open channel. At the end of the year 
the reservoir contained 53,225,600,000 gallons of water and the sur- 
face of the water was at elevation 385.94. 

During the year 1,298,600,000 gallons of water was discharged 
from the reservoir through the pool below the dam and through 
the pipe line to the Lancaster Mills, in accordance with the pro- 
visions of section 4 of chapter 488 of the Acts of the year 1895, 
which requires that not less than 12,000,000 gallons, and such fur- 
ther quantity, not exceeding 12,000,000 gallons, as the owner of 
the mills shall deem necessary, shall be allowed to flow from the 
reservoir during each week. 

The emergency pumping station of the city of Worcester, located 
on the shore of the reservoir at South Bay in Boylston, was not 
operated by the city during the year. The Mayor and Water 
Commissioner of the city have agreed to remove all of the station 
and equipment, except the foundations and intake pipe, before the 
station is again submerged in the spring, but nothing had been done 
at the close of the vear. 



58 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

Miscellaneous debris brought into the reservoir during the high 
water flow in the spring was collected from the shores and disposed 
of at a cost of $73.46. 

The brook which enters the reservoir at the westerly side of 
Hastings cove, in Boyiston, was straightened, graded, and paved 
on the bottom and sides for a length of 395 feet at a cost of $454.27. 

At South Bay, in Boylston, the shore of the reservoir was paved 
for a distance of 102 feet and a width of 10 feet, and a wooden 
guard rail was constructed along the highway at the top of the slope. 
This work cost $230, and was necessary to prevent the undermin- 
ing of the highway by the action of the waves on the unprotected 
slope. 

Brush and weeds have been mowed, raked into piles and burned 
along the sides of the highways adjoining the water works lands, 
along the brooks flowing directly into the reservoir and along the 
margin of the reservoir, from a strip of water works land 100 feet 
in width extending for a distance of 3| miles along the highways 
bordering the reservoir, and at the North and South dikes. This 
work extended over a distance of 58 J miles and cost $4,013. 

Wheelock wire fences were constructed along the boundary of 
the water works land for a distance of 1,634 feet at the John Nava- 
roli and Parker Banning lands in West Boylston at a cost of about 
13 cents per linear foot, and an equivalent length of party fence 
was constructed by these adjoining owners. 

The Wachusett Dam and gate chambers are in good repair. A 
joint leak in the 24-inch pipe line leading to the Lancaster Mills 
canal, which had been developing for some time and caused con- 
siderable settlement in the lawn below the dam, was repaired in 
June at a cost of $563.26. To make these repairs it was necessary 
to excavate and tight sheet a trench about 20 feet long and 18 feet 
deep. 

The nine water works tenements and the buildings at the Clinton 
and Oakdale storage yards have been repaired where necessary. On 
February 3 the one and a half story wooden dwelling formerly 
owned by Charles H. Baldwin at Sterling Junction was entirely 
destroyed by fire. The cellar has since been filled in, fruit trees 
cut down and grounds graded. On June 24 the one and a half 
story wooden dwelling in Boylston, occupied by patrolman Charles 
S. Knight and known as the Tucker house, was entirely destroyed 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 59 

by fire. The cellar has been filled in, the trees which were injured 
by the fire cut down and the grounds graded. The barn at this 
place was not damaged at all by the fire and has been left for the 
use of the labor forces. 

The old two story brick house, known ak the Brelin house on 
Prescott Street, West Boylston, was razed in the fall and the cellar 
filled in and grounds graded. This house was last occupied in 
September, 1916. 

Shortly after the loss of the Tucker house 15.81 acres of the 
Everett Kendall farm on Main Street, Boylston, with the buildings 
thereon, were purchased for the protection of the water supply. 
The house is now occupied by patrolman Knight, who uses the 
small barn, but the large wooden barn has been razed at a cost of 
$354 and all the good lumber has been preserved for future use. 

Seven acres of water works land easterly of Beaman Street, West 
Boylston, was leased to the Worcester County Commissioners for 
agricultural purposes in connection with the Worcester County 
Training School for boys. 

Standing grass was sold from about 370 acres of water works 
land bordering on the reservoir and its tributary streams. The 
total receipts from the sale of this grass amount to $1,083.75. 

A Ford automobile, fitted with light truck body, was purchased 
in July for the use of the general foreman on work about the 
reservoir. 

Sudbury Reservoir. — The water in the Sudbury Reservoir was 
at elevation 258.49, approximately one-half foot below the crest of 
the overflow, at the beginning of the year, and was kept at about 
this elevation until the flash-boards were put in place April 9. The 
water was then maintained between elevation 259 and 260 until 
the flash-boards were removed, November 15. Early in November 
the water was drawn down to elevation 257 to facilitate the erec- 
tion of the poles for the Wachusett-Sudbury transmission line by 
the contractor for this work. 

The usual attention has been given to the care of the reservoir 
lands and structures. The shores of the reservoir were cleaned and 
the debris which had collected in coves was removed. Loam and a 
mixture of chemical fertilizer and salt were put on the land slope 
of the dam embankment in the spring and some loam was prepared 
for future use. 



60 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

The sprouts and brush were mowed in the lanes along the land 
lines through the woods for a distance of about 8 miles at a cost 
of $.78.00. Fifteen chestnut poles 25 feet in length for use on the 
works were cut, peeled and housed. Walks and drives were re- 
paired, iron doors, grilles, manhole covers, bridge rails, flash-board 
standards, life preservers, signs, guards and agricultural implements 
were repaired and painted. 

The Cratty house, in Fayville, was repaired by putting in a new 
hard pine floor and metal ceiling and by painting the woodwork 
and the new ceiling in the kitchen. The west side of the main 
house, where the clapboards were cracked and loose, was covered 
with roofing paper and shingled over the clapboards to keep the 
house warm. 

Seventeen standard land bounds and one copper bolt were set 
to define the boundaries of land acquired from Frederick R. S. 
Mildon in 1916 and from Carl R. Lindstrom in 1917. Both of these 
parcels are located in Southborough. The Carl R. Lindstrom land, 
which was acquired this year, has an area of 2.36 acres. 

Framingham Reservoir No. 3. — All of the water delivered through 
the Sudbury Aqueduct for the supply of the Metropolitan Water 
District was drawn from Framingham Reservoir No. 3, which was 
replenished with water from the Sudbury Reservoir, as required. 
During the winter the water was kept below the crest of the over- 
flow, between elevations 183 and 185, and during the warm weather 
the water was kept above the crest, between elevations 185 and 186. 
Water was wasted from the reservoir into Framingham Reservoir 
No. 1 over the flash-boards on one day in June, and through the 
waste-gates at times in May and June. The gate-house and dam 
received the usual care. Fertilizer was spread over the embank- 
ments and brush was mowed in the lanes through the woods and 
along the boundary of the reservoir lands for a distance of 2\ miles. 

Framingham Reservoirs Nos. 1 and 2, Ashland, Hopkinton and 
Whitehall Reservoirs. — No water was drawn from these reservoirs 
for supplying the Metropolitan Water District during the year and 
they were kept substantially full, and, with the exception of White- 
hall Reservoir, with flash-boards on the overflows when they were 
free from ice. In January and February the water in Framingham 
Reservoir No. 1 was drawn down about 4 feet to facilitate the work 
of installing a new water supply at the Bullard place, and during 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 61 

the freshet season the water in Ashland and Hopkinton reservoirs 
was drawn down about one foot so that the flow in the Sudbury 
River could be controlled properly. 

A discharge of not less than 1,500,000 gallons of water per day 
was maintained throughout the year from Framingham Reservoir 
No. 1 into the Sudbury River, as required by the provisions of 
chapter 177 of the Acts of the year 1872. Water was also discharged 
in larger quantities from time to time, as required to dispose of a 
portion of the yield of the watershed above Dam No. 1 which could 
not be stored in the reservoirs. 

The usual attention was given to the dams, gate-houses and 
structures at these reservoirs. Fertilizer was spread on the reser- 
voir embankments. The riprap slopes and the grounds at all dams 
and the ironwork and stop-planks at the gate-houses have been 
kept in good condition. 

Early in the year a new water supply was installed at the water 
works premises known as the Bullard place, located on Salem End 
Road at Framingham Reservoir No. 1 and occupied by one of the 
foremen. It consisted of a Vaile-Kimes double-acting duplex pump 
with a capacity of 12 gallons per minute, a 30-inch diameter x 10 
feet long steel pressure tank and a f-horse power electric motor 
which operates the pump automatically with the variation of pres- 
sure in the tank. The apparatus is located in the house cellar. 
The pump is supplied with water from the 48-inch main located 
about 180 feet south of the house through a 2-inch cement-lined 
iron suction pipe, and a l|-inch cement-lined iron supply pipe 130 
feet in length extends from the pressure tank to the barn. An 
ample supply of water at a pressure of 50 pounds per square inch 
is now available at all times at the house and barn for fire pro- 
tection or other purposes. The charge for electricity used to oper- 
ate the pump has never exceeded the Company's minimum charge 
of 75 cents per month. 

Brush has been mowed and burned for a total length of 21.6 
miles along the waste channels and in the lanes through the woods, 
along the boundary lines of the water works lands at these reser- 
voirs, and f of a mile of new lanes have been cut at Hopkinton 
Reservoir. 

Two bounds were set to mark the boundary of the water works 
lands recently acquired from E. E. Goodale at Whitehall Reservoir. 



62 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

At Ashland Reservoir the gate-keeper's house was repaired by 
putting in a new platform and steps at the rear entrance. Late in 
the fall work was begun on the new barn, about 30 feet square, 
to replace the old barn which is no longer suitable for use. At the 
end of the year the cellar had been excavated, the foundation wall 
was built and work had been begun on the superstructure. This 
work is being done by the water works employees when not required 
elsewhere. 

During the year one new cottage was built at Whitehall Reser- 
voir, one was removed and one was torn down, so that there are 
now 64 cottages, or one less than last year, located on the shores 
of this reservoir. There were 8 motor boats, 84 sail boats and 25 
canoes in use on the reservoir during the summer, a total of 117, 
or 8 less than in 1916. 

Farm Pond. — Although Farm Pond is not used as a source of 
supply for the Metropolitan Water District the water therein has 
been kept within about lj feet of the high-water line throughout 
the year by supplying it with water from Framingham Reservoirs 
Nos. 1 and 2 in January to accommodate the town of Framingham, 
which obtains a portion of its water supply from the filter-gallery 
located on the easterly shore of the pond. No water was wasted 
from the pond during the year. Under the rights reserved by legis- 
lation the town of Framingham pumped 207,800,000 gallons of 
water from the filter-gallery and the Boston & Albany and New 
York, New Haven & Hartford railroad companies took approxi- 
mately 185,000,000 gallons directly from the pond for their use 
during the year. 

Lake Cochituate. — At the beginning of the year the water in 
Lake Cochituate was at elevation 143.23, approximately one foot 
below high-water line. Water was drawn from the lake through the 
Cochituate Aqueduct for water supply in August and September, 
and was wasted at the outlet dam at times during every month in 
the year. 

The buildings and grounds at the foreman's headquarters have 
received the usual attention and some repairs have been made at 
the house and wagon shed, and both of these buildings were given 
a coat of paint. 

A gasoline-driven pump with a capacity of 6 gallons per minute, 
and a vertical steel pressure tank 36 inches in diameter x 6 feet in 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 63 

height was purchased of the Goulds Manufacturing Company in 
September and was installed in the barn cellar to improve the water 
supply for the house and other buildings. 

Brush was mowed in the lanes through the woods along the 
boundaries of the water works lands and the debris which had 
collected in the coves along the margins of the lake was removed. 

In connection with the maintenance of the surface water drain 
from Cochituate Village the grass and brush were mowed for a 
width of 10 feet on both sides of the open channel and sediment 
was removed from the catch basins and from the sand catcher on 
Bannister's Brook. 

During the year 36 cottages were built by adjoining property 
owners and two cottages were burned. There are now 124 cottages, 
12 garages and one stable on the adjoining lands. 

Aqueducts. 

Wachusett Aqueduct. — Water was discharged through the Wachu- 
sett Aqueduct from the Wachusett Reservoir on 302 days in 1917. 
The total time that the aqueduct was in use is equivalent to 118 
days, 20 hours and 44 minutes. The total quantity of water dis- 
charged was 32,893,900,000 gallons, equivalent to an average of 
90,120,000 gallons per day for the entire year. The Westborough 
State Hospital pumped 57,387,000 gallons of water, equivalent to 
an average consumption of 157,000 gallons per day, from the open 
channel just beyond the lower end of the masonry aqueduct. The 
12-inch iron suction pipe through which the water is pumped was 
extended about 750 feet to the terminal chamber of the masonry 
aqueduct. By this arrangement the hospital is assured of water 
direct from the Wachusett Reservoir at all times. Since November 
6, when this extension was completed, we have had the entire care 
and made all adjustments of the Venturi meter and recording appa- 
ratus which measures the water pumped. 

While the water in the upper portion of the open channel was 
drawn off for the extension of the suction pipe the stone paving at 
the terminal chamber was extended for a distance of 25 feet. Heavy 
field stones were used for this work to prevent further erosion of 
the bottom and slopes by the action of the water as it enters the 
channel from the terminal chamber, and the water-grass, weeds and 
sediment were cleaned from the bottom and sides of the channel 



64 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

for the entire distance of 4,670 feet above the upper dam. The 
cost of this work was $209.26. 

A driveway was constructed from Cedar Street, in Marlborough, 
crossing the New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad to the 
terminal chamber. The roadway is 10 feet wide and was built with 
stones from an old wall, which were covered with bank sand and 
gravel from a spoil bank on the aqueduct lands. The edges of the 
driveway were graded with loam and seeded. A Wheelock wire 
fence was built on the property line on one side and 55 white spruce 
trees were set out in a row on the other side of the driveway for a 
length of 700 feet. The cost of the work, including a small re- 
taining wall and culvert, the fencing and the grading was $1,114.88. 

A Wheelock wire fence 584 feet in length was erected on the 
property line between the parcel of land acquired last year, located 
near the terminal chamber and adjoining land of James B. Johnson. 

The iron railings and fences have been painted with Smith's 
Durable Metal Coating at the lower dam, at 8 highways along the 
aqueduct and at the Assabet Bridge, also the manhole covers and 
ladders at all manholes and the ironwork at the gaging manhole. 

About 6^ acres of aqueduct embankment was harrowed, fertil- 
ized and seeded at a cost of $136 per acre. This work extended 
over a distance of 5,800 feet and 10 tons of commercial fertilizer, 
\ ton of coarse salt and 6 bushels of grass seed were used in the 
work. 

Brush, grass and weeds have been mowed and disposed of for a 
distance of 10 miles along the aqueduct at a cost of $98 per mile. 

Sudbury Aqueduct. — During the year the Sudbury Aqueduct was 
in service continuously for conveying water from Framingham Reser- 
voir No. 3 to the Chestnut Hill distributing reservoir, with the ex- 
ception of 9| hours on January 11, when the flow was stopped in 
order to convey water from Framingham Reservoirs Nos. 1 and 2 
through the supply aqueduct to Farm Pond. The total quantity 
of water discharged through the aqueduct to Chestnut Hill Reser- 
voir was 20,276,800,000 gallons, equivalent to an average of 55,553,- 
000 gallons per day for the entire year, which is 5,193,000 gallons 
per day more than in 1916. 

The iron floor and gate standards in the gate-house at Farm 
Pond were given one coat of paint. 

The shed near the office at Framingham was made into a garage 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 65 

about 33J x 20 feet in dimension, by an addition extending 18 feet 
in the rear. A concrete floor was constructed and an Akron pipe 
was laid to a dry cesspool to take care of the wash water. The 
building was wired for electric lights and the surrounding grounds 
were graded. The cost of the garage, which will house three cars, 
with room for a bench and another car when making repairs, was 
$410. The exterior of the garage and of the office was given one 
coat of paint. 

The old stop-planks at the waste-weirs, which had been in po- 
sition for a long time and had been set in cement mortar to pre- 
vent leakage, were taken out, and as they were found to be gen- 
erally in poor condition new stop-planks, 24 in number, were made 
for the four waste-weirs. 

About 29,000 pounds of mixed chemical fertilizer and salt were 
spread on the aqueduct embankments at places where needed to 
keep the land in good condition. The culverts were kept free from 
snow and ice. Brush, grass and weeds were mowed where the 
aqueduct land is not cared for by the adjoining owners. The city 
of Newton Sewer Department laid a line of 12-inch Akron pipe in 
Portland cement mortar in the culvert under the aqueduct at 
Pleasant Street, Newton Center. 

Weston Aqueduct. — Water was supplied from the Sudbury Res- 
ervoir to the Weston Reservoir through the Weston Aqueduct on 
304 days during the year. The total time that this portion of the 
aqueduct was in service is equivalent to 185 days, 19 hours and 14 
minutes, and the total quantity of water discharged was 19,008,- 
800,000 gallons, equivalent to an average of 52,079,000 gallons per 
day for the entire year, which is 620,000 gallons per day less than 
last year. As the aqueduct is now operated in connection with the 
Sudbury power station it has not been in service on Sundays and 
holidays, and the total flow for the week has been discharged be- 
tween 7 a.m. and 11 p.m. on the other days. 

The interior and exterior ironwork at the head-house, the man- 
hole covers along the aqueduct, both barns at the White place in 
Nobscot and the interior and exterior woodwork at the head-house 
were given one coat of paint. The main portion of the house at 
the White place was shingled. 

Brush and sprouts growing from trees previously cut on the 
aqueduct land and in the lanes through the woods along the bound- 



66 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

ary of the water works land on the southerly side of the aqueduct, 
at the White place and for 3,400 feet east of Water Street, Nobscot, 
where there is a large area of land, were mowed. 

The culverts were kept free from snow and ice and 21,700 pounds 
of mixed chemical fertilizer and salt were spread on the large em- 
bankment between Edgell Street, Framingham, and the old Con- 
necticut Path, Wayland, and at a few other places. 

A Wheelock wire fence 900 feet long was erected along the aque- 
duct to replace an old wire fence that had entirely rusted away in 
some places. This fence was erected in most part on the existing 
posts but it was necessary to set 27 new posts. The iron fence and 
all of the interior ironwork at the terminal chamber were painted 
with black varnish and the driveway in front of the terminal chamber 
was surfaced with fine broken stone. 

Cochituate Aqueduct. — Water was discharged through the Cochitu- 
ate Aqueduct from Lake Cochituate to the Chestnut Hill distribut- 
ing reservoir on 29 days during the year. The total time that the 
aqueduct was in use is equivalent to 27 days, 8 hours and 20 min- 
utes, and the total quantity of water discharged was 125,400,000 
gallons. 

The aqueduct embankments were dressed with mixed chemical 
fertilizer where necessary to keep them in satisfactory condition. 
Six thousand pounds of fertilizer was used in the work. The cul- 
verts along the line have been kept free from ice, and brush, grass 
and weeds were mowed. 

The Newton & Watertown Gas Light Company laid a 2-inch 
wrought-iron pipe across the aqueduct from Carver Road to the 
Atlas Film Corporation building, in Newton Highlands, for a dis- 
tance of 320 feet. 

The town of Wellesley laid a line of 10-inch cast-iron pipe from 
its main sewer in Washington Street, across the aqueduct to Park 
Street, a distance of 48 feet, a line of 8-inch iron pipe 60 feet in 
length on Worcester Street across the aqueduct to the manhole 12 
feet easterly from the center of the aqueduct, and from this point 
a line of 10-inch iron pipe for a distance of 24 feet. All of these 
lines were laid with lead joints, under our supervision, to ensure 
water-tight work. 

Between Blossom Street and Wellesley Hills Square 17 house 
connections were made from the main sewer in Central and Wash- 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 67 

ington streets. These house connections were made with 5-inch 
cast-iron pipe with lead joints, under our supervision, as most of 
them cross the aqueduct. 

Sanitary Inspection of Watersheds. 

The usual sanitary inspection of the watersheds was made during 
the year for the purpose of preventing the pollution of the water 
supply. A summary of the work is given in the tables on pages 
68 and 69. 

Ice cutting operations were inspected at the several ponds and 
reservoirs during the winter and special watchmen were employed 
from May to September, inclusive, to prevent bathing and un- 
authorized boating and fishing in the reservoirs. 

Wachusett Watershed. 

On the Wachusett watershed 17 dwellings were built during the 
year, 5 buildings were destroyed by fire and 1 was removed. As 
a result of these changes there has been an increase of 11 premises 
on the watershed during the year, making the total premises at the 
close of the year 1,731. 

The most notable changes on the Wachusett watershed during 
the year are the extensive additions to the Jefferson Manufacturing 
Company's mills at Jeffersonville and Eagleville, the destruction by 
fire of the Warren tannery at Holden on June 19 and of the Town 
Hall in West Boylston early Christmas morning, the sale by the 
farmers of their flocks and herds, and the reduction of agricultural 
and increase of industrial activities. 



68 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 







•pasn si ja^M 


CO 


eo 


- 


CM 


o 


00 


OS 


- 


lO 


OS 

CO 


CO 
CM 


OS 


eo 


OS 
CO 


>• 

a 

E 

p 

X 


ou tjoiq.vi ao sasiuiaj<j 






























vqddng a^BA 




Cs 
CO 


OS 


CM 

CO 


us 


O0 


CO 
CO 


CO 


OS 
CM 




<M 


»o 


eo 


3* 


H 

•< 


-Ujj SuiAcq sastuiajj 
























eo 




CM 


A^ddng oi[ 


t- 


i 


■«*< 


1 


00 
00 


oo 


t- 


I 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


OO 


-qiij 3uiabt{ sastuiajj 




























CM 


-5 




1 


1 


CM 


1 


t«. 


eo 










•«*< 


CO 


1 


00 


< 

55 H 


"AjO^.O'BJSI^BSUf^ 












~* 
















CO 


































E. a 

S o 




O 


CM 


O 


■«*< 


co 


\ 




eo 


CO 




o 


^ H 


m 


CM 


z a 


■AJO^O'BJSI^'Bg 


t^ 


-<f 


CM 


CO 


o 

CM 


O 
CM 


OS 


00 


CO 


CM 


rf 


CO 


eo 


OS 

CO 


O 55 
































ow 


































spaq-jaipj 


1 


- 


1 


1 


1 


- 


1 


1 


1 


-« 


- 


•>* 
OS 


■ 1 


00 

OS 




o% paujBo aS^uiBjQ 
































CM 


,_, 


CO 


rrt 


i« 


00 


o 


CO 


<M 


»o 


,_, 


to 


,_, 


CM 




aSBUIBJQ OJS^ 




























t>- 




*# 


CM 


00 


,_ 


lO 


o 


Tt* 


00 


CO 


•«*< 


CM 


•* 


CM 


t-- 




'%weo'B\ sasiuiaij 




















<N 








OS 


•sa^sB^w 


1 


1 


1 


1 


- 


CM 


- 


1 


- 


1 


1 


1 


1 


■O 


ci 


Suutvp'Bjrnrej^ 


































1 


1 


,_, 


1 


1 


CM 


1 


,_, 


1 


1 


CO 


^ 


1 


OO 


a 
u 


a 


•A\io:p'ejsi^esufi 
































K 55 


































< s 
































(5 


pq «j 




oo 


t^ 


CO 


o 


CO 


lO 






© 


CO 


■* 


00 


«* 


o 


a 

03 

O 





•AlO^O'BJSiq.'Bg 






o 


CM 


00 


■* 


>* 


■<*l 


CM 


OS 


CO 


"3 






a 

Sa 




1 


1 


eq 


1 


O 


CM 


1 


1 


1 


CO 


CM 


CM 


1 


t>- 


•XjO^O'BJSI^.'BSUfl 




























1—1 


o 


fH •< 
































fc 


w 55 

a a 




























































CO 


o 


2° 






OS 


-* 


t^ 


"*l 


•*f 


t--. 


t^ 


CO 


r» 


00 




CO 


00 


H 
•< 
O 

M 


•AjO^O'BJSI^'Bg 


CM 


*— < 


Tt< 




eo 


CM 


CO 


CO 


CM 


oo 


-^ 


t>- 




OS 


a 

05 




1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


o 


1 


1 


1 


I 


1 


1 


1 


O 


< 


aSBui'BjQ ^nig ^oaaiQ 












1 ~* 
















" 



































•aSB 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


CM 


1 


1 


1 


I 


1 


1 


1 


CM 




-ureaQ Aauj ^oaaipuj 






























•aSB 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


I 


1 


1 


1 


1 




-ui-bjq ^atj<j loajiQ 






























'ZI6I 


eo 


CO 


HO 


1 


**i 


1 


1 


1 


1 


CM 


- 


C^l 


1 


O 
CM 




Suunp Snp spodssaQ 






























'ZI6I 






o 


*n 


00 


o 


CO 


OS 


lO 


>o 


OS 


OS 


CO 


00 




>* 




vn 




CM 


eo 


CO 


eo 




oo 


CO 


t^ 


CM 


Ttl 




aiojaq Snp sjoodssa^) 












i-H 
















00 




T -pa^oads 


o 


CM 


CM 


CO 


CO 


t^ 


CM 

Ci 


oo 


eo 


CO 




■«tl 
eo 


eo 


o 
eo 


-Ul 


sasiuiajj jo jaquinj^ 






CM 




CM 


CM 












eo 
























M 
































o 

g 




ai 
o 












o 












o 
o 
u 




pq 

•*s 




o 

pq 












hH 








fc 


„ 


pq 




0) 




K 


CD 


. 


. 






ti 


M 


a^ 




-a 


^ 




CI 


3 


. 


<D 


> 












Q 


o 
o 
u 

pq 

a3 
o 

c 
a 

u 


8 

u 

pq 
>> 

3 


8 
pq 

03 

cu 
*s 
cj 

O 


8 

PQ 
c 

3 


m 

3 

£ 

as 

o 


'J2 

05 

ID 
C 
09 

< 


c3 

a 
o 

m 

3 


a: 

Q 

- 

a: 

"3 


s 

t-, 

pq 

O 
b 

H 


3 

a: 

ci 

05 

c3 

W 


h 
J 

CQ 


s 

3 
u 

03 

a: 

CO 

3 
oj 


w 

aa 

o 
3 
01 


of 

o 
H 



No. 57.] 



AND SE^TRAGE BOARD. 



69 



2>. 












o 
u 

Si, 

s 






S 

&Q 



%K 






1 co in ci H 1 on l io 


^ H 


-lie 


" II 




•ajopbjspbsuji 




co 




2> 

o ° 










! 




ZC •? -^: t— i-o 03 -*s< ;o r~ i-- 


o 


MNCf 


i 1 

CO 1 [ 


z a 


•AIO}DBJSI}Bg 


n s r m ^ .~: c ^ n x 

CO (MO MNM^-N 


30 


■* 'SI CO 0-5 

co S3 — r~ 


£- 


C 55 

OH 




CO 


-"# 


— i 


CO 




•spaq-ia^ij; 


- ■ ~ 1 1 1 1 1 1 

CO 


CO 

CO 


N 


co 1 

CI 




o^. pauiBO aSBureiQ 


oo 


CO 


O 


o 










"~* 






Tf I is ;s co ■* r~ oa c<i co 


~-, 


1 CO -h JO 


o 




•83BUIBJQ OX 




s 




CO 




1 «s o co c-i i cM*ia 


_ 


O — t 1 


Ci 




'^.TIBOB ^ S8SIUI8JJ 


i-liH CO "* — CO CI 


CS 


CO CO CO 


t^ 


•sanpsBfa 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ~H | | 


- 


1 — 1 1 


- 




3uunpBjnuBj\[ 














I _^<^h h i Mcq-n 1 


CO 


— 1 1 CO 


CO 







■AJOpBJSTlBSUI 




*"■' 






a 


.-, ~ 












H 


5 < 




- 








H 


5 55 












O 


< s 












a 


a <: 




CO •"*■ CO 50 CO ~ CO CO tS lO 


CO 


t^ t^ CO CO 




00 


« 
p 


'AJOpBJSpBg 


TfCOCi CNOiSKO 


s 


CO w CO -^ 


CO 


55 














32 

a 


















1 .— COCO i-< 1 cSsSrtiO 


■* 


— ' 1 1 CO 


CO 


0G 

O 


•AJOpBJSpBSTIQ 




<M 






a 
O 
















1 CO CO ^ O C5 CO l^CO — 


CO 


^- -^ 


o 


55 



•itKXpBJSp.Bg 


CO CO 30 >£ O •«*> SO »*> 






•~ 












o 




1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


1 


1 1 1 — 




X 
OS 

•< 


a3BniBiQ ^nig paiiQ 










•a3B 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 CO 


CO 


— 1 1 1 


rt 


-utbiq £auj paiipui 










•a3B 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


1 


1 1 1 1 


1 




-utbiq a^HcE ^ 08I ia 










"ZI6I 


1 1 ~— N« 1 MH 


r~ 


CO CO i—i -h 

C3 — 


CO 




3aunp 3np sjoodssa3 










7161 


COOO=» MONOC5N 


CO 


i~ c: I~-t~ 


30 




is eo — lo — co — :s r- 


-** 1 


X«f OO 


o 




aiopq 3np spodssa^ 


CO CO CO CO CO « i— l 


CO 


— * CO — C5 


CO 




3 1 IK 1 1 1 1 1 O 


o 


I CO CO — 


„ 




•suorpauucQ ia.tt.ag 


CO «o L.O 


m 


t>- CO 


CO 






■"■ ' 


CO 


"H 


CO 




T - pa}oads 


OCw — C5 ^scococot^co 
CI Ci O CO COCOOXt^Ci. 




CO t^ — ~ 




-UI 


sasi raaij jo jaqrans^ 


CO COO CO CO •*< — — t~- 


oo 


MO-N 


"" 










— — 


CO 






co 






• 






— 












. . . . c 












£ 
























a 




s 








H • eo * • x' 




a 








n ■ o 




03 








no O £ 




K 






Eh 

U 


£ t S§ 




H . . . . 

< 






— 


S 1 §.5§ ££ 




5: 

^ "c 
< o 






Q 


— p &o M *0 ° ft 

a .a-^^/r 71 — "i — i = 




£ .£ 


• 








a a -"-£ - 








X = J ? 2 J-5x,~x— S 

Mpqjg bfcS _— = ~-f 


X* 

o 


SgglJ 

gc £? 

M eS b > 


x" 

C2 

••a 

o 






- § S ji § S 5 — ~{--~ 














fo^X<'^ H-=^^^ 




x-^r 





— 



70 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

Sudbury Watershed. 

On the Sudbury watershed there were 4,874 premises at the be- 
ginning of the year and 4,877 at the end of the year, an increase 
of 3 premises during the year; resulting from the construction of 
11 buildings and the destruction by fire or removal of 8 buildings. 

There has been some increase in industrial activity in Ashland, 
Hopkinton and Marlborough during the year. 

On October 12 two factories, a rooming house and a hotel were 
completely destroyed by fire in Westborough. 

A mobilization camp for the 6th Regiment, M. V. M., was lo- 
cated in June on Dudley Road, near Farm Pond, in Framingham. 
Surface drainage from this area was diverted by an intercepting 
ditch from the pond some years ago by the city of Boston, but as 
the camp was located quite near the pond and Sudbury Aqueduct 
precautions were taken to see that there was no pollution of the 
Metropolitan water supply. The town of Framingham has main- 
tained a supervised public swimming pool for the past three years 
in that part of the pond located south of the aqueduct and known 
locally as Little Farm Pond. This pool was ideally located for the 
use of the soldiers, over 16,000 baths being taken, so that there was 
no temptation for them to go elsewhere. 

The new low-level sewer which is to serve the northern and 
eastern sections of the city of Marlborough has been completed but 
as yet no houses on the Sudbury watershed have been connected. 
The authorities have not urged the owners to make these connections 
this fall because of the scarcity of pipe. 

Cochituate Watershed. 

On the Cochituate watershed there were 3,144 premises at the 
beginning of the year and 3,198 at the end of the year, an increase 
of 54, which results from the construction of 57 buildings and the 
destruction by fire or removal of 3 buildings. 

Protection of the Water Supply. 
Filtration and Chlorination. 

On the W T achusett watershed the surface water from 525 acres in 
the village of Sterling has been filtered at the Sterling filter-beds. 
The sewage from the Worcester County Training School has been 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 71 

purified at the filter-beds on Beaman Street in West Boylston. 
This institution now accommodates about 87 boys and teachers. The 
sewage from the five small cottages at Sterling Junction was filtered 
at the Gates Terrace filter-beds from April 11 to November 3, 
while the cottages were occupied. The cost of maintaining all of 
these filters was $713.57. 

On the Sudbury watershed the surface water from an area of 2 
square miles in Marlborough has been filtered at the Marlborough 
Brook filter-beds before entering the Sudbury Reservoir, with the 
exception of 15,200,000 gallons on February 26 and 27 which the 
filters could not take care of, and as it overflowed at the waste- 
ways it was treated with calcium hypochlorite. No diluted sewage 
from the Marlborough main sewer was received at the combined stor- 
age reservoir and filter-bed on Farm Road, but ground water from the 
sewer underdrain was filtered at this bed at times during the spring 
and fall. The drainage from the Southborough swimming pool was 
filtered at the beds near Boston Road and the pool was cleaned 
once during the season. The surface water from Cherry Street 
brook at Fayville was treated with calcium hypochlorite weekly in 
wet weather and when necessary during dry weather from April 
to December. The cost of the filtration and chlorination work on 
the Sudbury watershed was $2,882.83. 

On the Cochituate watershed the surface water from an area of 
about one square mile of the thickly settled portion of the town of 
Natick was pumped at the Pegan filter station and filtered before 
it entered Lake Cochituate, with the exception of the overflow from 
the intercepting reservoir on February 26 and 27 and from March 
11 to 18 and on May 6, during which time there was a total over- 
flow of 15,200,000 gallons which was treated with calcium hypo- 
chlorite. 

The pumping station was operated on 234 days during the year 
and 305,935,000 gallons, equivalent to an average of 838,000 gallons 
per day for the entire year was pumped to the filters. The cost of 
operating and maintaining the pumping station and filters was 
$4,415.50 which is equivalent to a cost of $14.43 per million gallons 
pumped. 

The amount of water pumped and the cost per million gallons 
was increased this year as in previous years by waste from the 
Natick Box Company's factory which flowed through the inter- 



72 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

cepting ditch into the intercepting reservoir, and the removal of the 
paper pulp deposited in the settling reservoir and on the filter-beds 
has been a source of considerable expense which, as in former years, 
will be paid by the Natick Box Company. 

Improvement of Swamps and Brooks. 

The ditches maintained in the swamps on the watersheds for 
improving the quality of the water were cleaned and the weeds 
and brush were mowed for a width of 10 to 20 feet on both sides 
where necessary. The total length of these ditches is 36.67 miles, 
of which 27.73 miles have been cared for by the Wachusett De- 
partment at a cost of $932.60 for the usual cleaning and mowing. 
An expenditure of $1,110.45 was made for repairing slopes and 
paving for a distance of 9,120 feet and for replacing the board 
bottoms and slope footings for a distance of 2,040 feet. The cost 
of the usual cleaning and mowing along the 8.94 miles of ditches 
which are cared for by the Sudbury Department was $400, and an 
expenditure of $398 was made for repairing the board bottoms and 
sills for a length of 1,371 feet, slope footings for a length of 4,165 
feet and paving for a length of 1,871 feet. This work covered short 
distances in all of the ditches. A portion of the Mowry Brook 
drainage ditch was rebuilt on account of the relocation of Boston 
Road in Marlborough by the Massachusetts Highway Commission. 
The work on the ditch was done by the department forces at a cost 
of $51.37, which was repaid by the Highway Commission. 

An area of about 4j acres in Little Crane Swamp, Northborough, 
where the growth of swamp maple, elm and chestnut was damaged 
by fire in 1911 and was badly infested with the gypsy moth, was 
cleared at a cost of $358.90. About 80 cords of wood, valued at 
$266, and 9 chestnut poles 40 feet in length, which were used in 
the transmission line, valued at $65, were obtained from this work. 

Wheelock wire fencing has been erected on the property line be- 
tween the water works land and land of Garad Busby in North- 
borough for a distance of 1,050 feet, at a cost of $142.50, and an 
equivalent length of party fence was erected by Mr. Busby. 

The lanes cut in previous years along the boundary line of Cedar 
Swamp in the Sudbury Department were mowed for a length of 
18,600 feet and new lines were cut for a length of 14,000 feet. 

The work of improving Gates Brook in the Wachusett watershed, 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 73 

at the district known as "The Settlement" in West Boylston, which 
was begun in 1915 and continued in 1916, was resumed on July 23 
and was suspended for the season on September 20 on account of the 
scarcity and high cost of labor and of the State highway construc- 
tion in the vicinity, which increased the cost of transporting the 
materials. During 1917 one concrete culvert 40 feet long and 440 
feet of open channel of the standard swamp drainage board-bottom 
type were constructed. About half of the work is now finished. 
The expenditures for the work during 1917 were $1,171.71, and the 
total to date $4,773.18. 

The Maple Street Brook in Marlborough in the Sudbury water- 
shed was kept free from debris. 

The condition of Beaver Dam Brook in the Cochituate watershed 
was considerably improved in appearance and capacity during the 
month of October for a distance of 12,700 feet above Mill Street, 
in Natick, where it enters Lake Cochituate, by removing sand bars 
and debris from the channel and by cutting the brush and weeds 
along the banks. The expenditure for this work amounted to $690. 

For the protection of the water supply on the Wachusett water- 
shed 15.77 acres of land, located on Main Street in Boylston, has 
been acquired during the year. 

Clinton Sewage Disposal Wokks. 
Pumping Station. 

Chapter 557 of the Acts of the year 1898 provides that works 
for the disposal of the sewage of the town of Clinton shall be main- 
tained and operated by the Metropolitan Water Works until the 
sewage of said town shall have outgrown the normal capacity of 
the South Branch of the Nashua River to properly dispose thereof. 
In connection with the operation of works for this purpose the 
pumping station was operated daily and the quantity of sewage 
pumped to the filter-beds was equivalent to 1,050,000 gallons per 
day throughout the year, which is 175,000 gallons per day less than 
in 1916. This decrease in the quantity pumped was due to the 
small flow in the Nashua River, which reduced the leakage of 
ground water into the adjacent defective sections of the town 
sewers. 

The Blake compound duplex pump and the boiler, which have 
been kept in reserve since the electrically-driven 12-inch DeLaval 



74 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



centrifugal pump was installed in 1912, were overhauled and re- 
paired for use in case of emergency. 

With the exception of two days, when the steam pump was being 
operated on trials, all of the sewage was pumped with the centrifu- 
gal pump. The pumping statistics are as follows 



Total pumpage (gallons), 
Average pumpage (gallons per day), . 
Electric energy used (kilowatt hours), 
Pumpage per kilowatt hour (gallons), 

Average lift (feet), 

Efficiency of pumping unit and transmission line (per cent.), 
Coal used for burning sludge and heating (pounds), 

Cost of pumping: — 
Labor, 

Electric energy at $5.30 per thousand kilowatt hours, 

Coal for burning sludge and heating, 

Repairs and supplies, 



383,148,000 

1,050,000 

119,455 

3,206 

49.6 

55.5 

71,390 



$1,043 04 
633 11 
198 88 
176 13 



Total for station, $2,051 16 



Cost per million gallons, 
Cost per million foot gallons, 



$5.35 
0.1079 



Filters. 

The filter-beds and settling basins were operated jointly daily 
throughout the year by first passing the sewage through one of 
B.ve settling basins the effluent from which was applied to the 25 
one-acre sand filter-beds in regular doses of about 60,000 gallons 
of sewage in 30 minutes, at intervals of about 1| days, equivalent 
to about 41,000 gallons per acre per day. The cost of maintaining 
the filters during 1917 was as follows: — 



Labor, 

Supplies and expenses, . 

Total, 

Cost per million gallons filtered, . 



$5,034 66 
265 34 

$5,300 00 

$13 83 



The two wooden buildings and the woodwork on the carriers, 
manholes and settling basins have been repaired and painted and 
the concrete floors of the carriers have been repaired. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



75 



The character of the effluent, as shown in the following table, 
has been much less satisfactory than in previous years, and the 
operation of the beds has been difficult because the filtering material 
has now become clogged with organic matter to a depth of 6 or 
8 inches. Plans have been made to inaugurate measures for the 
improvement of the condition of the filters during the coming 
summer. 

IParts per 100,000.] 







1915. 


1916. 


1917. 




January 
to June. 


July to 
December. 


Whole 
Year. 


Albuminoid ammonia, sewage, 


1.4350 


1.0255 


.7170 


1.0133 


.8652 


Albuminoid ammonia, effluent, 




.09347 


.0983 


. 14675 


.12985 


.1383 


Reduction, per cent., 




93.5 


90 


80 


87 


84 


Oxygen consumed, sewage, 




9.5333 


7.70 


7.27 


7.97 


7.62 


Free ammonia, sewage, . 




3.7867 


2.7850 


3.0013 


3.9400 


3.4707 


Free ammonia, effluent, . 




.5924 


1.0316 


1.8184 


1.7133 


1.7658 


Reduction, per cent., 




84 


63 


39 


57 


49 


Nitrogen as nitrates, effluent, 




.7152 


.3693 


.2065 


.1966 


.20165 


Iron, effluent, .... 




.30815 


1.052 


1.710 


2.363 


2.036 


Average quantity of sewage filtered, gal- 
lons per day. 


941,000 


1,225,000 


1,169,000 


930,000 


1,050,000 



Forestry. 

Wachusett Department. 

An area of about 74 acres back of the Westerly portion of the 
North Dike at the Wachusett Reservoir was cleared of a growth 
of scrub oak and planted with white pine seedlings 4 years old from 
the North Dike nursery. They were spaced 12 feet apart in rows 
12 feet apart. It is planned to interplant these white pines with 
red pines from the Oakdale nursery during 1918, making the com- 
pleted plantings 6 feet x 6 feet. 

As the main trunk lines of two divisions of the Boston & Maine 
Railroad pass parallel to and about 500 feet distant from this area, 
with only a highway 60 feet wide to prevent fires from spreading 
to the planted area, an additional fire guard 50 feet wide on the 
railroad side of the highway was cleared for a distance of 5,400 
feet, and for 10 feet in width it was grubbed and plowed. 

An area of 3f acres which was acquired in 1916, located near the 



"6 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



terminal chamber of the Wachusett Aqueduct, was cleared and 
planted with white pine seedlings 4 years old from the North Dike 
nursery. 

Along the open channel portion of the Wachusett Aqueduct in 
Southborough and the marginal lands of the Wachusett Reservoir 
in Clinton, Boylston and West Boylston 103§ acres of water works 
land was planted with white pine seedlings 4 years old from the 
North Dike nursery and white spruce seedlings 5 years old from 
the Oakdale nursery. In this work 98,100 white pine and 1,300 
white spruce seedlings were used. The cost of clearing the land 
was $36.46 per acre and of planting the trees was $15.04 per 
thousand. 

In the fall 8,550 white pine seedlings 5 years old from the North 
Dike nursery were planted to fill in where trees from previous 
plantings had died, and about 700 white pine trees from 18 to 24 
inches in height were set out on the sites of the three buildings 
which were removed from water works land between High Street 
and the Clinton sewerage filter-beds in Lancaster. 

The necessary care has been given to the trees in the Oakdale 

and North Dike nurseries, which at the end of the year contained 

the following: — 

Oakdale Nursery. 

White pine seedlings, 3 years old, in transplant beds, . . . . 94,000 

White pine seedlings, 2 years old, in transplant beds, .... 8,200 

Scotch pine seedlings, 3 years old, in transplant beds, .... 41,400 

Red pine seedlings, 3 years old, in transplant beds, 40,800 

Red pine seedlings, 5 years old, in transplant beds, 120 

Norway pine seedlings, 3 years old, in transplant beds, .... 200 

Sequoia seedlings, 6 years old, in transplant beds, ..... 100 

White spruce seedlings, 6 years old, in transplant beds, .... 11,100 

Tamarack seedlings, 2 years old, in transplant beds, 5,800 

Maple seedlings, 1 year old, transplanted from field, 750 

Arbor vitse seedlings, 2 years old, in seed beds, 400 



North Dike Nursery. 

White pine seedlings, 5 years old, in transplant beds, 
White pine seedlings, 3 years old, in transplant beds, 



202,870 

6,500 
37,500 



44,000 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 77 

The sprouts and undergrowth which were interfering with the 
pines on about 69 acres of land planted during the last five years 
were cut and disposed of at a cost of about $22 per acre. 

About 350 acres of land along the main highways about the 
Wachusett Reservoir and at the dam, known to be infested with 
the gypsy moth, was sprayed with 8,500 pounds of arsenate of lead 
between June 2 and July 7, at a cost of $1,726.42. This work was 
done with the power sprayer auto truck, which was thoroughly 
overhauled and equipped with a 40-horse power Waukesha motor 
early in the year before the beginning of the spraying season. 

The work of scouting the marginal lands of the reservoir for 
gypsy moth egg clusters and painting them with creosote, begun in 
the fall of 1916, was continued through the winter; it was then 
suspended and was resumed in the late fall. At the close of the 
year about 2,500 acres of land had been covered and most of the 
land had been gone over a second time. About 245,000 egg clusters 
were found and painted at a cost of $926.10. 

During July and August many of the plantings on the marginal 
lands around the reservoir were inspected for the pine-tree weevil 
on two occasions. During the first inspection 2,540 leaders were 
cut and burned and 380 during the second inspection. The number 
of leaders attacked was much fewer than during previous years, 
due to the fact that as the trees become older the weevil gradually 
disappears. The cost of the work was $81.27. 

A thorough inspection of the white pine forests on the marginal 
lands of the Wachusett Reservoir was made during the year by 
experts from the Nursery Inspection Department of the Common- 
wealth, but no evidence of white pine blister rust was found. 

It has been noticed that the brown-tail moth has entirely dis- 
appeared from the water works land in this department. 

The total cost of protecting the trees and plantings from insects 
and disease during the year was $2,736.40. 

The usual fire patrol service was maintained during the spring 
and fall seasons. On April 16 the only fire of any consequence 
occurred. Seven acres of land on the easterly side of Beaman 
Street, West Boylston, was burned over and about 8,000 white 
pines from 3 to 10 feet in height were destroyed. 

The brush, grass and weeds on If miles of the marginal fire 
guard, which is 40 feet wide, and on 31 f miles of forest roads from 
15 to 45 feet wide, were mowed and burned at a cost of $1,150.84. 



78 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

At the close of the year the water works land in the Wachusett 
watershed may be classified as follows : — 



Forest lands acquired and not since improved (acres) , 

Forest lands acquired and since improved (acres), 

Land which has been planted with trees and not cleared (acres) , 

Land which has been planted with trees and since cleared (acres), 

Land to be planted with trees (acres), 

Open land which will probably not be planted (acres) , 
Marginal strip along shore of the reservoir (acres), . 



1,365 
324 
399 

1,098 
584 
811 
209 



Total, 4,790 

The total expenditures for forestry during the year in the Wachu- 
sett Department were $13,693.31. 

Sudbury Department. 

At the Sudbury Reservoir about 26 acres of land on Pine Hill 
on the northerly side of the reservoir and about 2 acres east of the 
junction of the Framingham, Marlborough and Acre Bridge roads 
was cleared of small trees and brush in preparation for transplant- 
ing pine seedlings. All of the large trees were cut into cord wood 
and the limbs and brush were burned. The cost of the work was 
$22 per acre. 

The lower limbs of the pine trees on the south side of the reser- 
voir and west of the dam were cut off and grass and brush growing 
between the pines and the roads were burned to protect the pines 
from fire. 

In May and June 49,300 white pines 3 years old, 43,700 Scotch 
pines 3 years old, 44,050 red pines 3 years old and 43,500 white 
spruces 4 years old were field planted from the nursery. Fifty 
thousand white pine seedlings 2 years old were received from the 
nursery of the State Forester's department at Barnstable and set 
out in the new water works nursery on the Ball land for use in 
field planting during the coming season. 

Quite a number of field planted pines about 2\ feet in height 
were taken up and transplanted on adjacent land in connection 
with the work of clearing for the Wachusett-Sudbury transmission 
line. 

Fire patrol service was maintained at times when the conditions 
were favorable for fires to spread rapidly, and where pine trees 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 79 

have been planted along the highways the dried grass and brush 
were mowed, or burned if conditions were favorable, between the 
highway and the plantings. 

Two fires occurred at the Sudbury Reservoir: one on April 24, 
which burned over two acres of planted land and destroyed 2,400 
white pines about 2\ feet in height; the other, on May 11, burned 
over | of an acre of grass land and caused no damage. 

The sprouts and brush along the Weston Aqueduct between Mill- 
wood Street and the entrance to Tunnel No. 3 in Framingham 
and at some other places where they were high enough to hinder 
the growth of the field planted pines were mowed. 

Fifteen hundred white pines 3 years old from the nursery at the 
Sudbury Reservoir were set out west of Edgell Street, in Nobscot, 
and 1,500 were set out on the gravel slope between the aqueduct and 
the old Connecticut Path near Cochituate Road in Wayland. 

The trees at the Sudbury and Framingham reservoirs, at Lake 
Cochituate and at the White place and siphon chamber No. 2 on 
the Weston Aqueduct were sprayed with arsenate of lead to pro- 
tect them from the gypsy moth and other insects. A horse-drawn 
power sprayer was used for this work. It was in use about one 
month. Ten thousand pounds of arsenate of lead was used and 
the total cost of the work was $1,900.84. 

Some time was spent scouting for gypsy moth egg clusters and 
painting them with creosote. About 120,000 clusters were found 
and painted at a cost of $500. 

The plantings in the Sudbury Department were inspected for the 
pine-tree weevil and the leaders were cut and destroyed where the 
weevil was found. The cost of the work was about $275.00. 

The brown-tail moth caterpillars were destroyed within 50 feet 
of the highways at the Sudbury and Framingham reservoirs and 
where found in connection with spraying operations. 

The total amount expended for forestry in the Sudbury Depart- 
ment during the year was $7,596.44. 

Pipe Lines and Reservoirs Department. 

The gypsy and brown-tail moths and the elm-leaf beetles were 

destroyed on water works lands around the distribution reservoirs 

as in former years by spraying the foliage with arsenate of lead in 

June and July, by painting the gypsy moth egg clusters with creo- 



80 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

sote and cutting and burning the webs of the brown-tail moth 
during the winter. 

The spraying was done with a power sprayer drawn by two horses 
and an area of approximately 140 acres was covered. Five thousand, 
four hundred and thirty pounds of arsenate of lead in paste form 
was used, and was mixed in the proportion of 10 pounds of paste 
to 100 gallons of water. 

Oyster scale, found on the shrubs at Chestnut Hill Reservoir, 
was destroyed by using Scalecide and Arlington oil. 

The leaders were cut from some of the pine trees at the Weston 
Reservoir which were attacked by the pine-tree weevil. 

The total expenditures for forestry in the Pipe Lines and Reser- 
voirs Department was $3,821.86. 

Hydro-electric Service. 

The total quantity of electric energy delivered during the year 
from the two hydro-electric stations which are operated in connec- 
tion with the Metropolitan Water Works, was 11,942,769 kilowatt 
hours. 

The total value of this energy at the contract prices is $67,961.93. 
The total expenses chargeable to both stations are $35,530.24, 
leaving a profit from the operation of the stations of $32,431.69, 
equivalent to $2,715 per thousand kilowatt hours. 

Wachusett Power Station. 

The Wachusett power station was operated on 299 days during 
the year. The energy not used in connection with the operation 
of the Metropolitan Water Works was sold to the New England 
Power Company under an agreement made September 30, 1916, 
which provides that until the completion of the Wachusett-Sudbury 
transmission line the Company will take as much energy from the 
Wachusett power station as it can reasonably and properly use 
without wasting water at its own plants. Under this arrangement 
99.1 per cent, of the total amount of water drawn from the reser- 
voir into the Wachusett Aqueduct was used to develop electric 
energy. This is the largest portion of the total water drawn into 
the aqueduct that has been used for the development of electricity 
in any year since the station was put into regular service in 1911. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 81 

On August 21 an unusually severe electrical storm damaged one 
of the lightning arrester units and caused other minor damage to 
the plant, but temporary repairs were readily made and there was 
only a short interruption of the regular service during and imme- 
diately after the storm. 

During the latter part of the year the electrical apparatus was 
carefully inspected and all meters were tested and accurately adjusted 
by engineers from the testing laboratory of the Edison Electric 
Illuminating Company of Boston. 

The Wachusett power station statistics for the year 1917 are as 
follows : — 

Total energy developed (kilowatt hours), 7,043,836 

Energy used at power station (kilowatt hours), . . . 11,862 



Available energy (kilowatt hours), 7,031,974 

Water used (gallons), 32,595,100,000 

Average head (feet), .......... 95.9 

Energy developed per million foot gallons (kilowatt hours), . 2.25 

Efficiency of station (per cent.), 71.71 

Credits: — 

Energy sold New England Power Company, 

6,912,519 kilowatt hours at $0.0053, . . . $36,636 35 
Energy furnished Clinton sewerage pumping 

station, 119,455 kilowatt hours at $0.0053, 633 11 

Charges : — 

Superintendence, . 

Labor, operating station, 

Repairs and supplies for station, 



Taxes, 

Administration, general supervision, interest and 
sinking fund, 



Profit, 

Cost of available energy per thousand kilowatt hours, 





$37,269 46 


$720 00 
5,381 56 
1,262 42 




$7,363 98 

3,025 00 

1 




6,560 00 


16,948 98 




. 


$20,320 48 


•s, . . . 


$2,410 



S2 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

Sudbury Power Station. 

As the Sudbury power station was put into service late in 1916 
considerable miscellaneous work was necessary during 1917 to get 
all of the accessories in satisfactory condition. A Morse silent 
chain drive was substituted for the noisy herring-bone gears on the 
oil pump of the hydraulic governor equipment. Remote control 
devices were installed for opening the oil drain valves on the two 
750 kilowatt transformers from points near the switchboard. Oil 
gage glasses were put on the generators and an air receiver 21 inches 
in diameter and 6 feet high was installed with hose and nozzle for 
blowing dust out of generator coils and other inaccessible places. 

As the mechanism furnished by the Coffin Valve Company in 
1916 for operating the sluice gates did not give the guaranteed re- 
sults the Company this year installed larger electric motors, sub- 
stituted some new gears and relined and rebabitted the bearings on 
the gate stands and they now operate the gates in a satisfactory 
manner. 

Water supply and toilet facilities were installed, and window and 
door screens were provided for use in warm weather. 

A pipe line consisting of 434 feet of 2-inch iron pipe and 456 
feet of 4-inch vitrified clay pipe with open joints was laid to con- 
nect the tight cesspool which receives the sewage from the power 
station with a filtering cesspool located in a gravel pit on the water 
works land well removed from the water supply. As often as the 
tight cesspool fills it is emptied into the filtering cesspool through 
the pipe line by means of a portable Swaby centrifugal pump with 
a capacity of 30 gallons per minute, operated by a If -horse power 
Brown wall air-cooled gasoline engine which was purchased for pump- 
ing out culverts on the aqueduct lines. 

During a severe electric storm which passed over the station on 
August 21 several porcelain insulators were broken on the main 
circuit breaker and other minor damage was done by lightning. 

The entire output, with the exception of a small amount of energy 
used for lighting the station and operating the electrically driven 
accessories, has been sold to the Edison Electric Illuminating Com- 
pany of Boston under a contract dated December 21, 1914. The 
station is not regularly operated on Sundays or legal holidays. 

All of the water discharged from the Sudbury Reservoir, with 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 83 

the exception of 13,500,000 gallons, which was wasted at the over- 
flow on February 27 and 28, was used for the development of 
electric energy. 

The Sudbury power station statistics are as follows : — 

Total energy developed (kilowatt hours), 4,928,900 

Energy used at power station (kilowatt hours), .... 18,105 

Available energy (kilowatt hours), 4,910,795 

Framingham Reservoir No. 3 service: — 

Water used (gallons), 19,671,600,000 

Average head (feet), 66.00 

Weston Aqueduct service : — 

Water used (gallons), 19,008,800,000 

Average head (feet), 39.10 

Energy developed per million foot gallons (kilowatt hours), . 2.41 

Efficiency of station (per cent.), 76.80 

Credit: — 

Energy sold Edison Electric Illuminating Company of 
Boston, 4,910,795 kilowatt hours at $0.00625, . . . $30,692 47 

Charges: — 

Superintendence, $1,19-0 00 

Labor, operating station, 8,294 25 

Repairs and supplies for station, .... 1,583 01 

$11,067 26 
Taxes, 1,054 00 

Administration, general supervision, interest 

and sinking fund, 6,460 00 

18,581 26 

Profit, $12,111 21 

Cost of available energy per thousand kilowatt hours, . $3 . 784 

Distribution Pumping Service. 

The total quantity of water pumped at the five distribution 

pumping stations during the year was 23,608,020,000 gallons, which 

is 1,568,750,000 gallons or 7.12 per cent, more than the quantity 

pumped in 1916. The total quantity of water supplied to the Metro- 



84 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



politan Water District in 1917 was 40,161,778,000 gallons or 3.19 
per cent, more than in 1916, and of this quantity 58.14 per cent, 
was pumped for the southern high and low and the northern high 
and extra high-service districts, and 0.65 per cent, was repumped 
for the southern extra high-service district. 

The total cost of operating all of the stations for the year 1917 
was $132,331.03, which is $34,491.12 more than for 1916. This 
increase includes $8,540.91 for labor, $20,150.63 for fuel, $5,141.32 
for repairs, $211.60 for oil and waste and $446.66 for small supplies. 

The increase for labor is due in part to the employment of five 
additional men on account of increased work at some of the stations, 
and so that no employee would be alone on a watch when the 
machinery was in motion, and in part to a general increase of ten 
per cent, in wages which has been effective since May 27. The 
other increases are due almost entirely to the increased cost of 
materials and supplies. 

The amount of coal purchased from various parties for the pump- 
ing stations and the cost of the coal is as follows: — 







Stations (Amount in 


Gross Tons). 


a 
o 
H 

SS 



- -T 

fe.S 
O 


Dealers. 


■+3 -■ 

m O 

o 


m O 

o 


a 

o 
o 


a 
o 

bC 

a 

< 


u 

>> 

m 


E. Russell Norton, bituminous, .... 


967.28 


- 


- 


- 


- 


$4 51 


E. Russell Norton, bituminous, . 




36.61 


"~ 


- 


- 


- 


4 89 


E. Russell Norton, bituminous, . 




- 


1,278.75 


- 


- 


- 


4 36 


Shaftsbury Coal & Coke Co., bituminous, 




490.31 


- 


- 


- 


- 


7 65 


Shaftsbury Coal & Coke Co., bituminous, 




- , 


1,506.43 


- 


- 


- 


7 37 


John E. Cousens Coal Co., bituminous, 




- 


108.285 


- 


- 


- 


10 51 


C. W. Claflin & Co., anthracite screenings, 




271.74 


- 


- 


- 


- 


4 21 


C. W. Claflin & Co., anthracite screenings, 




- 


350.52 


- 


- 


- 


3 25 


Dexter & Carpenter Inc., anthracite screenings, . 


473.59 


- 


- 


- 


- 


4 47 


Dexter & Carpenter Inc., anthracite screenings, . 


- 


1,241 26 


- 


- 


- 


4 29 


H. N. Hartwell & Son Inc., anthracite screenings, 


- 


141.47 


- 


- 


- 


4 11 


E. Russell Norton, bituminous, .... 


- 


- 


640.98 


- 


- 


9 49 



1 Hoisted from cars and wheeled to bins. 2 Dumped from cars into bins. 

8 Unloaded at freight yard, teamed VA miles and dumped into bins. 

4 Includes cost of unloading coal from cars and all expenses incidental to the storage of the coal except as 
otherwise noted. 

5 Delivered at station by truck. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



85 





Stations (Amount in - Gross Tons). 


c 
o 
H 

m 
m 

o 




M 


M 


a 
o 
Ph 

o 
ft 


« 


M 


Dealers. 


2_: 


GO O 


o 

.2 
< 


u 

03 
Ah 

o 
13 

>* 

w 


S3.S 
p-pq 

g.a 

o 


E. Russell Norton, bituminous, .... 


- 


- 


205. 20 6 


- 


- 


6 64 


Shaftsbury Coal & Coke Co., bituminous, . 


- 


- 


12.616 


- 


- 


9 14 


Locke Coal Co., anthracite screenings, 


- 


- 


493.05 


- 


- 


5 39 


Peirce & Winn Co., bituminous, .... 


- 


- 


- 


40. 91 5 


- 


9 60 


E. Russell Norton, bituminous 


- 


- 


- 


48.08 


- 


8 26 


Shaftsbury Coal & Coke Co., bituminous, . 


- 


- 


- 


199.91 


- 


7 70 


Garfield & Proctor Coal Co., bituminous, . 


- 


- 


- 


153.81 


- 


4 56 


Dexter & Carpenter Inc., anthracite screenings, . 


- 


- 


- 


161.10 


- 


4 92 


C. W. Claflin & Co., anthracite screenings, . 


- 


- 


- 


79.75 


- 


4 07 


E. Russell Norton, bituminous, .... 


- 


- 


- 


- 


37.05 


8 84 


Garfield & Proctor Coal Co., bituminous, . 


- 


- 


- 


- 


88.66 


4 40 


Sawtelle Coal Co., anthracite screenings, 


- 


- 


- 


- 


45. 04 5 


5 32 


Roxbury Coal Co., anthracite screenings, 


- 


- 


- 


- 


83.565 


3 92 


Roxbury Coal Co., anthracite screenings, 


- 


- 


- 


- 


44.645 


3 64 


Sawtelle Coal Co. , anthracite screenings, 


- 


- 


- 


- 


36.34 5 


3 64 


Total, bituminous, . . . . . 


1,494.20 


2,893.46 


858.79 


442.71 


125.71 


- 


Total, anthracite screenings 


745.33 


1,733.25 


493.05 


240.85 


209.58 


- 


Average cost, bituminous: — 














In bins, 


$5 55 


$6 16 


$8 81 


$6 85 


$5 71 


- 


On cars, . . 


5 25 


6 03 


- 


6 75 


5 52 


- 


Average cost, anthracite screenings: — 














In bins, . . . ... 


4 38 


4 06 


5 39 


4 64 


4 11 


- 


On cars, 


4 11 


3 89 


- 


4 47 


- 


- 



1 Hoisted from cars and wheeled to bins. 2 Dumped from cars into bins. 

3 Unloaded at freight yard, teamed V/i miles and dumped into bins. 

4 Includes cost of unloading coal from cars and all expenses incidental to the storage of the coal except as 
otherwise noted. 

6 Delivered at station by truck. 

6 Hoisted from cars, dumped into trucks, transported 13 miles and dumped into bins. 



During the first half of the year the bituminous coal was pur- 
chased under contracts made in 1916 and specifications which had 
been in use for several years. Under these contracts the price per 
gross ton was reduced 2 cents for each 50 heat units or fraction 
thereof less than 14,700 per pound of dry coal and 1 cent for each 
one-half of 1 per cent, or fraction thereof of ash in the dry coal 



86 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

in excess of 8 per cent.; and for each 50 heat units or fraction 
thereof in excess of 14,800 per pound of dry coal the price per ton 
was increased 1 cent, and weights of coal as received at Chestnut 
Hill pumping stations were corrected for moisture in excess of 3 
per cent. 

During the last half of the year bituminous coal was purchased 
for the Spot Pond pumping station under similar specifications, 
with standards of 14,500 and 14,600 heat units per pound of dry 
coal, but for the Chestnut Hill and Arlington pumping stations the 
bituminous coal was purchased under revised specifications which 
provided that the price should vary in direct proportion with the 
heating value from a basis of 14,300 heat units per pound of dry 
coal, and in inverse proportion with the percentage of ash from a 
basis of 9 per cent.; and for the Chestnut Hill pumping station 
the weight of coal as received was corrected to a standard of 3 per 
cent, moisture. 

During the first half of the year the anthracite screenings were 
not purchased under specifications, but during the last half of the 
year screenings were purchased under specifications which provided 
that the quality of the dry coal should approximate a standard 
of 12,500 heat units per pound, 9 per cent, volatile matter and less 
than 16 per cent, ash, and that for each one-half of 1 per cent, 
or fraction thereof of ash in the dry coal in excess of 20 per cent, 
the price per gross ton should be decreased 2 cents and coal which 
contained more than 25 per cent, of ash might be rejected. 

Contracts made during the last half of the year contained a pro- 
vision that the Commonwealth would assume the payment of all 
increases in freight charges that might take effect during the term 
of the contract. 

During July we were unable to obtain shipments of bituminous 
coal from the mines to the Chestnut Hill pumping station in suffi- 
cient quantity to supply our needs and it became necessary to 
purchase 108 gross tons from a local dealer. 

Before the 1917 contracts were made for coal for the pumping 
stations an investigation was made to see if it would be advanta- 
geous to substitute fuel oil for coal and it was found that there was 
fully as much uncertainty about obtaining the oil when needed as 
there was about obtaining the coal, and that the cost of making 
steam would be increased if fuel oil should be used. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



87 



The results of analyses of the bituminous coal purchased for the 
pumping stations during 1917 are as follows: — 



Kind of Coal. 


Number 

of Samples 

tested. 


British 

Thermal 

Units. 


Percent- 
age of 
Volatile 
Matter. 


Percent- 
age 
of Ash. 


Percent- 
age of 
Moisture. 


Percent- 
age 
of Fixed 
Carbon. 


Davenport, .... 
Ake Mine, . . 
Peacock, .... 
Wendell, .... 


35 

28 

5 

1 


14,590 
14,157 
14,206 
14,483 


19.46 
23.50 
20.81 
20.56 


7.76 
10.17 
10.17 

8.55 


2.71 
4.18 
3.96 
2.40 


72.78 
66.33 
69.02 
70.89 



Chestnut Hill Pumping Stations. 

A 2| kilowatt direct-current electric generator was installed at 
Chestnut Hill pumping station No. 1 and is operated from the 
Pelton water wheel for lighting the machine shop and store room, 
the garage and the basements and other places at both stations, 
which did not receive illumination during the day time when the 
main lighting plant was not in operation. 

A double-coil feed-water heater has been purchased for utilizing 
the exhaust steam from the dynamo engine at station No. 2 but 
has not yet been installed. It will replace the heater now in use 
temporarily, belonging in station No. 1 which is now held in re- 
serve most of the time. One of the coils in the new heater has a 
heating surface of 40 square feet for heating the feed water to the 
low-service boilers and the other coil has a heating surface of 60 
square feet for heating the feed water to the high-service boilers. 

The 4-inch cast-iron flange pipe blow-off drain from the boilers 
at station No. 2, which was broken in several places, was relaid 
with 4-inch bell and spigot cast-iron pipe with lead joints for the 
entire length of 105 feet inside of the station. In connection with 
this work brick walls were carried down below the floor on both 
sides of the pipe, the bottom of the trench was covered with broken 
stone and removable concrete slabs were set in the floor above the 
pipe to form a conduit so that in the future leaks may be readily 
repaired. 

All outside overhead electric wires about the pumping stations 
were removed and put in underground conduits and a private tele- 
phone system with six stations was installed for use between the 
various buildings. 



88 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



At these stations a daily average of 36,216,100 gallons of water 
was pumped to supply the southern high-service district and the 
southern extra high-service pumping station, and a daily average 
of 19,216,400 gallons was pumped to supply the southern low-service 
district. Compared with the pumpage of 1916 this is an increase 
of 1,844,800 gallons per day for the high service. The low-service 
pumpage in 1916 and in 1917 was not directly comparable because 
a portion of the supply for the low-service district was at times 
delivered by gravity from the Weston Aqueduct supply mains. 

The pumping statistics for 1917 are as follows: — 

/ 

Southern High-service Statistics. 





Pumping Station No. 1. 


Pumping 

Station 
No. 2. 






Engines 

Nos. 
1 and 2. 


Engine 
No. 3. 


Engine 

No. 4. 


Engine 
No. 12. 


Totals. 


Daily pumping capacity (gallons), 


16,000,000 


20,000,000 


30,000,000 


40,000,000 


106,000,000 


Total quantity pumped (million gallons), . 


1,016.02 


10.02 


2,824.12 


9,368.71 


13,218.87 


Daily average quantity pumped (gallons), . 


2,783,600 


27,500 


7,737,300 


25,667,700 


36,216,100 


Bituminous coal used in pumping (pounds), 


1,490,563 


17,414 


1,415,349 


3,925,849 


6,849,175 


Anthracite screenings used in pumping 

(pounds). 
Average lift (feet), 


582,980 
133.48 


2,600 
116.65 


577,301 
120.36 


2,316,677 
121.70 


3,479,558 
122.32 


Cost of pumping: — 












Labor, 


S4.888.09 1 


S47.69 1 


$6,986.38! 


$10,844.26 2 


$22,766.42 


Fuel, 


6,013.11 


49.06 


4,716.21 


15,589.24 


26,367.62 


Repairs, 


1,427.05 


12.40 


1,888.82 


2,106.26 


5,434.53 


Oil, waste and packing, .... 


97.43 


.90 


139.83 


400.23 


638.39 


Small supplies, 


151.35 


1.48 


216.33 


195.79 


564.95 


Totals, 


$12,577.03 


$111.53 


$13,947.57 


$29,135.78 


$55,771.91 


Cost per million gallons pumped, 


$12.3787 


$11.1307 


$4.9387 


$3.1099 


$4.2191 


Cost per million foot gallons, 


.0927 


.0954 


.0410 


.0256 


.0345 



1 Operation and care of station with machinery held in reserve a large portion of the time. 

2 Operation only. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



89 



Southern Low-service Statistics. 



Daily pumping capacity each engine (gallons), 
Total quantity pumped (gallons), 
Daily average quantity pumped (gallons), 
Bituminous coal used (pounds), 
Anthracite screenings used (pounds), 
Average lift (feet), 



Chestnut Hill 
Pumping Station 
No. 2. — Engines 

Nos. 5, 6 and 7. 

35,000,000 

7,013,970,000 

19,216,400 

2,384,400 

1,470,210 

33.24 



Cost of pumping: — 
Labor, . 
Fuel, . 

Repairs, . . . . 
Oil, waste and packing, 
Small supplies, 

Total, . 



Cost per million gallons pumped, 
Cost per million foot gallons, 



$16,609 56 

9,571 76 

3,860 28 

263 71 

231 70 

$30,537 01 

$4.3537 
.1310 



Spot Pond Pumping Station. 

During the year the lockers, wash bowls and shower baths lo- 
cated in the basement below the engine-room were enclosed by 
wooden partitions and a heating coil was installed so that the room 
can be comfortably heated during cold weather without heating the 
entire basement. 

Orders were placed during the year for an 18-inch Pelton water 
wheel and a 2\ kilowatt direct-current generator for lighting the 
station during the night when the steam plant is not in operation 
and for lighting the department house, which is located near the 
station, and will be occupied by the foreman in charge of the reser- 
voirs and grounds in this vicinity; for a Hagan steam-jet ash con- 
veyor, which will discharge the ashes into a steel storage tank 
elevated so that a truck can be driven under it and loaded through 
a hopper in the bottom of the tank, and for a Venturi meter and 
register for measuring the boiler feed water. Owing to delays in 
delivery of materials, none of these improvements has been com- 
pleted. 



90 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



All of the water supplied to the northern high-service district 
during the year was pumped at this station with the exception of 
a supply for the towns of Swampscott and Nahant from 7.45 a.m. 
December 23 to 5.30 p.m. December 24, while a break in the 16- 
inch northern high-service main in Broadway, Revere, was being 
repaired. 

The northern high-service pumping statistics for 1917 are as 
follows : — 



Total quantity pumped (gallons) , 

Daily average quantity pumped (gallons), 

Bituminous coal used (pounds), . 

Anthracite screenings used (pounds), 

Average lift (feet), .... 

Engine No. 8 operated (hours), . 

Engine No. 9 operated (hours), . 

Quantity pumped by Engine No. 8 (gallons), 

Quantity pumped by Engine No. 9 (gallons) , 



Cost of pumping: — 
Labor, . 
Fuel, . 
Repairs, . 

Oil, waste and packing, 
Small supplies, 



2,802,560,000 

7,678,200 

1,878,768 

997,431 

130.08 

155 

3,260 

68,840,000 

2,733,720,000 



$10,698 99 

9,358 07 

2,324 30 

343 00 

316 58 



Total for station, $23,040 94 

Cost per million gallons pumped, $8.2214 

Cost per million foot gallons, . 0632 



Arlington Pumping Station. 

All of the water for the northern extra high-service district was 
pumped at the Arlington pumping station from the northern low- 
service mains. The pumping statistics for 1917 are as follows: — 



Total quantity pumped (gallons), 

Daily average quantity pumped (gallons), 

Bituminous cOal used (pounds), 

Anthracite screening used (pounds) , 

Average lift (feet), 

Engine No. 10 operated (hours), 

Engine No. 11 operated (hours), 

Quantity pumped by Engine No. lb (gallons), 

Quantity pumped by Engine No. 11 (gallons), 



313,230,000 

858,200 

902,040 

378,920 

282.61 

6,273 

225 

305,410,000 

7,820,000 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



91 



Cost of pumping : — 
Labor, . . . ■ . 
Fuel, . . ., ... 
Repairs, .... 
Oil, waste and packing, 
Small supplies, 

Total for station, . 



Cost per million gallons pumped, 
Cost per million foot gallons, 



$8,805 91 


3,580 16 


886 48 


159 68 


227 68 


$13,659 91 


$43.6098 


.1543 



Hyde Park Pumping Station. 

All of the water for the southern extra high-service district was 
pumped at the Hyde Park station from the southern high-service 
mains. The pumping statistics for 1917 are as follows: — 



Total quantity pumped (gallons), 

Daily average quantity pumped (gallons) , 

Bituminous coal used (pounds), 

Anthracite screenings used (pounds), 

Average lift (feet), .... 

Engine No. 13 operated (hours), 

Engine No. 14 operated (hours), 

Quantity pumped by Engine No. 13 (gallons), 

Quantity pumped by Engine No. 14 (gallons), 



Cost of pumping: — 
Labor, . 

Fuel, . . " .. . 
Repairs, . 

Oil, waste and packing, 
Small supplies, 



Total for station, 



259,390,000 

710,700 

258,249 

412,746 

133.17 

996 

3,229 

60,850,000 

198,540,000 



$7,424 18 

1,277 6'9 

243 63 

140 66 

235 10 

$9,321 26 



Cost per million gallons pumped, 
Cost per million foot gallons, 



$35.9353 

.2698 



Additional information regarding the operation of the pumping 
engines at the various stations is given on pages 169 to 178. 



92 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Distribution Reservoirs. 

The locations and elevations of the distribution reservoirs of the 
Metropolitan Water Works are shown by the following table : — 



Distribution Reservoirs and Locations. 


Elevation of 
High Water, i 


Capacity in 
Gallons. 


Low Service: — 
Chestnut Hill Reservoir, Brighton District of Boston, 

Mystic Reservoir, Medford, 

Northern High Service: — 

Fells Reservoir, Stoneham, . 

Bear Hill Reservoir, Stoneham, 

Northern Extra High Service: — 
Arlington Standpipe, Arlington, 

Southern High Service: — 

Fisher Hill Reservoir, Brookline, 

Waban Hill Reservoir,. Newton, 

Forbes Hill Reservoir, Quincy, 

Forbes Hill Standpipe, Quincy, 

Southern Extra High Service: — 
Bellevue Reservoir Steel Tank, West Roxbury District of Boston, . 


163.00 
134.00 
200.00 
157.00 

271.00 
300.00 

442.00 

251.00 
264.50 
192.00 
251.00 

375.00 


1,791,700,000 

300,000,000 

200,000,000 

26,200,000 

41,400,000 
2,450,000 

550,000 

15,500,000 

13,500,000 

5,100,000 

330,000 

2,500,000 


Total, 


- 


2,399,230,000 



1 Elevation in feet above Boston City Base. 

By arrangement with the city of Chelsea a portion of the main- 
tenance of its reservoir on Powder Horn Hill is assumed by the 
department, and the reservoir is used by the department when 
necessary in connection with the supplying of water to the northern 
high-service district. This reservoir has a capacity of 1,000,000 gal- 
lons with high-water line at elevation 196.6. The reservoir was in 
service from January 5 to May 19 and from November 30 to the 
end of the year, and was kept full for emergency use when not 
actually in service. 

Water is delivered into the Chestnut Hill Reservoir from the 
storage reservoirs by gravity and is pumped from that reservoir 
for the low-service and southern high-service districts. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 93 

Water is delivered from the Sudbury Reservoir through the Weston 
Aqueduct by gravity and is then supplied to the low-service works 
through the Weston Aqueduct supply mains by gravity. 

Water for the northern high-service district is pumped from Spot 
Pond to the Fells and Bear Hill reservoirs. For the northern extra 
high-service district water is pumped from the low-service pipe 
lines to the steel tank at Arlington Heights and for the southern 
extra high-service water is pumped from the southern high-service 
pipe lines to the Bellevue Reservoir. 

Weston Reservoir. 

At the Weston Reservoir the inlet chamber, open channel, reser- 
voir lands and screen chamber were cared for, and the walks, drive- 
ways, drains and fences were given the necessary attention. 

The cellar hole where the attendant's house was removed in 1916 
was filled and, together with the old roadway leading to the house, 
was graded and sown with grass seed. The ironwork at the screen 
chamber and Ash Street bridge and the stop-planks at the screen 
chamber were painted. 

Chestnut Hill, Fisher Hill and Waban Hill Reservoirs. 

The regular work of caring for the gate-houses and screens, shrubs, 
walks, drives and grounds at the Chestnut Hill, Fisher Hill and 
Waban Hill reservoirs was attended to as usual. 

At the Chestnut Hill Reservoir both basins have been in use 
throughout the year. The portion of the driveway between the 
Lawrence and Bradlee basins which was repaired last year was given 
a final surfacing of Tarvia and fine broken stone at a cost of 10 
cents per square yard. 

The iron pipe rails of the new fence built last year along Beacon 
Street on the south shore of Bradlee basin were painted with two 
coats of red lead paint and one coat of green paint. 

The superstructure of the masonry garage which was under con- 
struction at the close of 1916 was completed by the contractor June 
21, at a cost of $8,029.85. The plumbing, steam heating apparatus 
and electric light wiring were installed by the department forces 
and the garage is now entirely completed, but a little grading re- 
mains to be done around the building. 

The pumping stations and stable have received the usual attention. 



94 METROPOLITAN- WATER [Pub. Doc. 

The high Forsythia plants in the large bed at Waban Hill Reser- 
voir at the junction of Manet Road and Ward Street were removed 
and replaced with 34 low Cotoneaster plants, because of the danger 
from an obstructed view at this corner. 

Some repairs were made to the gate-house at the Fisher Hill 
Reservoir and the interior was cleaned and painted. 

Spot Pond, Fells and Bear Hill Reservoirs. 

The usual attention was given to the gate-houses and screens at 
Spot Pond and the Fells and Bear Hill reservoirs, and to the pro- 
tection of the trees and care of the water works land at Spot Pond. 

Steam-heating apparatus has been installed in the department 
house at Spot Pond and electric supplies have been purchased for 
use in installing electric lighting service from the pumping station. 
The row boat and motor boat were painted and varnished, the 
engine in the motor boat was overhauled and put in good condition 
and the boat-house and tool-house were painted. The foot paths 
have been resurfaced with cinders. 

Bellevue and Forbes Hill Reservoirs. 

The Bellevue Reservoir has been in service throughout the year. 
The grading and seeding of the area about the reservoir, which 
was disturbed during its construction, was completed and a re- 
movable closet was erected around the Venturi meter and recording 
gage to prevent the water in the small pressure pipes from freezing 
during cold weather. 

At Forbes Hill the steel tank has been, in regular use all the year 
and the reservoir has been held full of water for emergency use. 
The iron stairs leading to the top of the tower were scraped and 
painted and the interior of the gate-chamber has been cleaned and 
painted. In connection with the rebuilding of the fence on the south 
side of the reservoir lot 49 4-inch x 4-inch reinforced concrete posts 
faced with hard pine strips have been set 16| feet apart ready for 
the galvanized iron wire, which has been received but has not been 
strung because workmen have not been available. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 95 

Arlington and Mystic Reservoirs. 

Some minor repairs were made to the stairway leading to the top 
of the Arlington standpipe, which has been in service throughout 
the year. The grounds around the standpipe have been cared for 
by the town of Arlington under an agreement made with this de- 
partment. 

The Mystic Reservoir was not in service during the year but has 
been kept full of water for emergency use. The roadway around 
the reservoir has been resurfaced. Early in July the two long 
flights of steps on the northwesterly embankment were removed and 
entrance to the remaining steps was closed with wire fencing and 
" no admittance " signs were posted. 

Mystic Lake, Conduit and Pumping Station. 

Since these structures were abandoned for water supply purposes 
in 1898 they have been given only such attention as is necessary 
to keep them in proper repair. 

At Mystic Lake the gate-house was painted and the bridge over 
the dam at the outlet was repaired. Some additional stone bounds 
were set to define the boundaries of the water works land. Wire 
was strung on the fence posts set last year for a distance of 826 
feet south of the lake and 560 feet of standard wire fencing was 
erected on the northerly side. 

Extensive repairs were partially completed at the house near the 
station. The clapboards and finish were removed and the building 
was covered with stucco lathing, a piazza was built on the front 
of the house and a porch 12 feet wide over the front door. These 
were also covered with stucco lathing and the whole exterior except 
the rear of the house was given a coat of three-ply stucco work. 

Grounds at Arlington and Hyde Park Pumping Stations. 

At the Arlington and Hyde Park pumping stations the lawns and 
shrubs have been given the usual attention. The side track at the 
Arlington station was repaired by the Boston & Maine Railroad at 
a cost to this department of $56.98, and the siding at the Hyde 
Park station was repaired by the New York, New Haven & Hart- 
ford Railroad at a cost to this department of $236.74. 

During the latter part of the year the exterior woodwork at the 



96 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

Arlington pumping station was given two coats of paint at a cost 
of $164, and the exterior woodwork at the Hyde Park pumping 
station was also given two coats of paint at a cost of $136.55. 

Protection of Water Supply. 

Special watchmen were employed at the Chestnut Hill, Fells, 
Mystic and Bear Hill reservoirs and at Spot Pond, as required during 
the year, to prevent violation of the sanitary rules and regulations. 

Distribution Pipe Lines. 

The length of distribution pipe lines owned and operated by the 
department at the close of the year is 122.34 miles, an increase of 
0.07 of a mile during the year. In connection with the maintenance 
of the pipe lines they have been regularly patrolled and the work of 
municipalities and public service corporations in the vicinity of the 
pipe lines has been inspected. The location of each valve chamber 
has been plainly stenciled on objects along the line so that valves 
can be readily found when desired. The valves have been kept 
in good working condition, the valve chambers were cleaned and the 
frames and covers were regulated to conform to the grades of the 
streets where necessary. The covers over important valves were 
covered with salt during cold weather to keep them free from ice. 

In connection with the laying of granite block pavement on con- 
crete base in Williams Street near Broadway, by the city of Chelsea, 
a section of the 20-inch main which was laid by the city of Boston 
in 1849 and acquired by this department in 1899 was relocated for 
a distance of 170 feet, where it was laid with shallow cover over 
the 24-inch main which is also located at this place. The cost of 
this work was $953.63. 

For the improvement of the supply to the Hyde Park district of 
the city of Boston, connection was made December 8 between the 
Metropolitan Water Works 20-inch southern high-service main and 
the local main in Hyde Park Avenue at Glenwood Street. A 12- 
inch gate valve and a check valve w r ere installed on this connection. 

Pipe Bridges. 

Extensive repairs w r ere made to the pipe boxes at the bridges over 
both branches of the Pines River in Revere and Saugus in connection 
with the repairs made by the Massachusetts Highway Commission 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 97 

at these bridges. The work included the removal of the main tim- 
bers on the sides of the box and part of the flooring and all of the 
top at the bridge over the northern branch of the river, and the 
boxes at both bridges were thoroughly cleaned and painted. The 
cost of these repairs was $551.31. 

In August the pipe box was rebuilt at the bridge over the Boston 
& Maine Railroad tracks at Massachusetts Avenue in Cambridge, a 
new floor was laid and sealed with pitch and tar to make it smoke 
proof and the old top of the box was repaired and replaced. The 
cost of this work was $449.09. 

Minor repairs have been made at most of the other pipe boxes 
and bridges which are now all in good condition with the exception 
of the box at the Chelsea North Bridge where extensive repairs are 
necessary. 

Pipe Yards. 

Pipe yards have been maintained at the Chestnut Hill Reservoir 
and near the Glen wood Station of the Boston & Maine Railroad in 
Medford as in former years. Minor repairs have been made to the 
office, carpenter shop and storage-shed at the Chestnut Hill yard 
and to the buildings at the Glenwood yard, where the interior of 
the office and the room used as a garage were painted and varnished 
and the fence along the street was painted. 

Meters, Regulating Valves and Recording Pressure Gages. 

There are now 69 Venturi meters varying in size from 6 inches 
to 60 inches in diameter; 6 Hersey detector meters; 3 Hersey disc 
meters and 1 Hersey torrent meter connected with the distribution 
mains, which, with the exception of 10 of the Venturi meters, were 
used for measuring the water supplied to the various municipalities 
in the Metropolitan Water District. 

In connection with the operation of these meters two men were 
employed continuously during the year and some additional labor 
was furnished for this work from time to time as required. The 
Venturi meter registers were read and the clocks wound twice each 
week, and they were given such additional attention as was neces- 
sary to keep them in repair and operating satisfactorily. 

There are now 8 pressure regulating valves installed on the dis- 
tribution mains for reducing the pressure of the water supplied to 
portions of Chelsea, East Boston and Hyde Park, and to Nahant, 



98 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

Revere, Swampscott and Winthrop. The regulating valve at Beach 
Street, Revere, was in service from January 1 until May 3. The 
controlling valves of the Ross regulators at Nahant and at Beach 
Street, Revere, were overhauled and adjusted by the Ross Valve 
Company. 

The 10-inch regulating valve at the Revere- Winthrop boundary 
line was removed on February 1 and after it was thoroughly over- 
hauled and adjusted by the Waters Governor Company was put 
in service again on May 3. The cost of removing, overhauling and 
adjusting this valve was $189.13. 

All of the other regulating valves have received the usual atten- 
tion and have controlled the pressures in a satisfactory manner. 

Recording pressure gages have been maintained at 22 stations on 
the Metropolitan Water Works, and a table on pages 202 and 203, 
showing the elevation of the hydraulic grade line in feet above 
Boston city base at 18 of these stations for each month during the 
year, has been prepared from the charts. 

A connection to the recording pressure gage at the fire engine 
house on Broad Street, in Lynn, was relaid on account of changes 
made at this place by the city. On account of the severe electro- 
lytic pitting of the old lead pipe, which was laid in 1906, the new 
pipe was laid inside of a 4-inch vitrified clay pipe for a distance of 
50 feet to protect it from this action. On account of this change 
the gage was out of service from September 18 to November 8. 

Breaks and Leaks. 

February 14, about 6.35 a.m., a break occurred in the 30-inch 
low-service main on Boylston Street at Boylston Place, in Brookline. 
This pipe was laid by the city of Boston in 1848 and was acquired 
from the city in 1913. Notice was received by the department of 
the location of the break at about 6.50 a.m. and the line was shut 
off by 8 a.m. At the point where the break occurred the pipe 
trench had been excavated through ledge and the pipe was supported 
on brick piers. The pipes were about 8j feet in length and there 
was one pier about 2 feet back of each bell. The area of the hole 
which was blown in the side of the pipe was about 28 square feet 
and water flowed from it at the rate of about 72,000,000 gallons per 
day for about 30 minutes. The flow then gradually diminished as 
the gates were closed. The estimated amount of water which flowed 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 99 

from the pipe is 3,000,000 gallons. It washed away the surface of 
Boylston Place and Cameron Street and flooded the basements of 
several houses to variable depths of from 4 inches to 4§ feet. Be- 
yond Cameron Street the water followed the Boston & Albany Rail- 
road tracks and entered Muddy River at a point about 4,000 feet 
from the break. The street surfaces were repaired by the Brookline 
Street Department. The basements of the houses were pumped out 
and cleaned by department forces. Repairs to the pipe line were 
completed on the 18th and the line was left under pressure until 
the 19th, when it was again put into service. The total expendi- 
tures on account of the break amount to $1,826.08. 

On November 17 a crack about 5 feet in length developed in the 
48-inch pipe in Clinton Road, Brookline, 145 feet east of Dean 
Road. This pipe line was laid by the city of Boston in 1869 and 
was acquired from the city in 1913. The gates were closed as soon 
as the leak was reported and before any damage was done, as the 
water which escaped flowed off through a street catch basin. The 
pipe line was repaired and was again put into service on November 
24. The cost of the work was $619.78. 

December 23 a crack 18 inches long developed in the 16-inch 
pipe in Broadway near Winthrop Street, Revere. The pipe was 
repaired and the line was again put in service on the 24th. The 
water from the break entered the basements of two stores, which 
were thoroughly cleaned and put in good condition by the department 
forces. The total expenditure on account of the break was $145.25. 

January 17 a leak developed at the bottom of a joint on a 48- 
inch ^-curve in the southern high-service pipe line at the Arbor- 
way, near South Street, Forest Hills. This leak appeared to have 
been caused by settlement, resulting from the excavation of a tunnel 
under the pipe line a few years previously for the Metropolitan 
sewer. The cost of repairing this leak was $476.95. 

February 27 the work of repairing a joint leak in the 36-inch up- 
stream pipe line under the Maiden River was begun. A scow 24 
feet x 60 feet, equipped with derrick, engine and 6-inch centrifugal 
pump, and a diver were used for this work. After excavating around 
the pipe by using the centrifugal pump and water jet it was found 
that the lead joint had been worn away by sand-blast action of the 
escaping jet of water. Repairs were made by using lead wool. The 
entire cost of the work was $851.15. 



100 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

Between May 16 and 19 a leak was repaired at a taper joint in 
the down-stream line of the 36-inch submerged pipes under the 
Charles River at the foot of Magazine Street in Cambridge. An 
outfit consisting of a pontoon equipped with a steam boiler and 
6-inch centrifugal pump, and a diver, were used for this work. 
The diver found that the lead was partially out of the taper joint 
for the entire circumference and it was redriven and patched with 
lead wool. The total cost of the work was $525.57. 

July 10 a joint leak developed in the 30-inch cement pipe in 
Broadway at Winchester Street, Somerville. This leak appeared to 
be due to a concrete duct which settled on the pipe. It was repaired 
at a cost of $139.71. 

There were 39 minor joint leaks in the mains during the year. 
Sixteen of these leaks were from defective wooden joints, which were 
repaired at a cost of $283.08 and the remainder were for the most 
part from lead joints and were probably caused by slight settlements 
in the pipe lines, which were repaired at a cost of $253.27. 

Emergency Pipe Line Service. 

The two f-ton auto trucks, equipped with special bodies and gate- 
operating attachments, which were put into service last year for 
operating valves quickly in case of emergency, have been in service 
during the entire year. One of the trucks is stationed at the Chest- 
nut Hill pipe yard in Brighton for the southern division and the 
other is stationed at the Glenwood pipe yard in Medford for the 
northern distribution pipe system. Men are kept on duty ready to 
operate the trucks in case of emergency at any time during the day 
or night. 

Consumption of Water. 

The total quantity of water furnished to the 18 municipalities 
supplied from the Metropolitan Water Works during the year, as 
measured by the water works meters was 40,161,778,000 gallons, 
which is equivalent to an average consumption of 110,032,300 gal- 
lons per day. On the basis of an estimated population of 1,215,840 
this is equivalent to a consumption of 90 gallons per capita per day. 
This is an increase of one gallon per capita or 1.1 per cent, in the 
average daily per capita consumption during 1917 over the con- 
sumption of 1916. This is probably due in part to the increased 
industrial activity on account of the war, and in part to the in- 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



101 



tentional waste of water to protect the house fixtures from frost 
during the unusually cold weather in February and December, and 
to the use of water on lawns and gardens during the unusually hot 
dry weather in July and August. For an entire week the consump- 
tion averaged 129,425,000 gallons per day in February and 123,324,- 
000 gallons per day in August, as compared with an average of 
100,026,000 gallons per day for an entire week in November when 
the consumption was at a minimum rate. 

Diagrams following page 102 show graphically the results accom- 
plished in the reduction of consumption by the installation of meters 
on service pipes. 

The average daily consumption of water in each of the munici- 
palities supplied from the Metropolitan Water Works during 1916 
and 1917, as measured by the Metropolitan Water Works meters, 
is as follows : — 











Estimated 

Popula- 
tion, 1917. 


Average Daily Consumption. 




1916. 


1917. 






Gallons. 


Gallons 

per 
Capita. 


Gallons. 


Gallons 

per 
Capita. 


Increase 

in 
Gallons. 


Boston, 


776,520 


80,358,800 


105 


82,073,200 


106 


1,714,400 


Somerville, 








91,060 


6,183,600 


69 


6,676,100 


73 


492,500 


Maiden, . 








51,160 


2,460,200 


49 


2,419,300 


47 


40,900 1 


Chelsea, . 








46,300 


3,070,900 


68 


3,188,500 


69 


117,600 


Everett, . 








39,780 


2,891,400 


74 


3,033,000 


76 


141,600 


Quincy, . 








43,110 


2,499,400 


59 


2,706,800 


63 


207,400 


Medford, . 








33,340 


1,487,000 


46 


1,641,300 


49 


154,300 


Melrose, . 








17,560 


781,800 


45 


902,900 


51 


121,100 


Revere, 








28,070 


1,591,200 


59 


1,615,400 


58 


24,200 


Watertown, 








17,900 


1,125,500 


65 


1,584,600 


89 


459,100 


Arlington, 








16,290 


929,400 


59 


997,100 


61 


67,700 


Milton, 








9,050 


371,300 


42 


375,000 


41 


3,700 


Winthrop, 








14,040 


707,800 


53 


727,200 


52 


19,400 


Stoneham, 








7,680 


437,900 


58 


531,300 


69 


93,400 


Belmont, . 








8,940 


447,800 


52 


474,800 


53 


27,000 


Lexington, 








5,790 


389,400 


69 


426,700 


74 


37,300 


Nahant, . 








1,480 


159,000 


110 


155,300 


105 


3.700 1 


Swampscott, 








7,770 


445,400 


59 


503,800 


65 


58,400 


District, 


1,215,840 


106,337,800 


89 


110,032,300 


90 


3,694,500 



1 Decrease. 



102 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



The average consumption in the several districts was as follows : — 





Gallons 

per Day, 

1917. 


Increase from 1916. 




Gallons 
per Day. 


Percent- 
age. 


Southern low-service district, embracing the low-service district of 
Boston, with the exception of Charlestown and East Boston, . 

Northern low-service district, embracing the low-service districts 
of Somerville, Chelsea, Maiden, Medford, Everett, Arlington, 
Charlestown and East Boston, ....... 

Southern high-service district, embracing Quincy and WateTtown, 
the high-service districts of Boston, and portions of Belmont 

Northern high-service district, embracing Melrose, Revere, Win- 
throp, Swampscott, Nahantand Stoneham, and the high-service 
districts of Somerville, Chelsea, Maiden, Medford, Everett and 
East Boston, . _ . 

Southern extra high-service district, embracing the higher portions 
of Hyde Park, Milton and West Roxbury, .... 

Northern extra high-service district, embracing Lexington and the 
higher portions of Arlington and Belmont, .... 


42,749,100 
22,418,300 
35,174,400 

8,124,400 
688,400 
877,700 


616,200 
l f 07©,900 

1,408,200 

480,800 
32,400 
77,000 


1.46 
5.06 
4.17 

6.29 
4.94 
9.62 


Totals 


110,032,300 


3,694,500 


3.47 



Installation of Meters on Service Pipes. 

Chapter 524 of the Acts of the year 1907, as amended by chapter 
177 of the Acts of the year 1909, requires that in municipalities 
supplied with water from the Metropolitan Water Works meters 
shall be set each year on all new service pipes and on 5 per cent, 
of all service pipes that were without meters on December 31, 1907, 
and that it shall be the duty of the Metropolitan Water and Sewer- 
age Board to supervise and promote the enforcement of the pro- 
visions of this act. 

Chapter 269 of the Special Acts of the year 1917 provides that 
the requirement that meters shall be set each year on 5 per cent, 
of all services that were not equipped with meters on December 31, 
1907, shall not apply to the city of Boston for a period of one year 
after the passage of this act. 

Information regarding the installation of meters on service pipes 
by the municipalities supplied with water from the Metropolitan 
Water Works to December 31, 1917, is given in the table on page 
103. From this table it may be seen that the total number of 
meters set on both old and new service pipes since 1907 in each of 
the municipalities is equal to or exceeds the total number of meters 
required by the statute to be set to December 31, 1917, although 
there has been some departure from an exact compliance with the 
law in certain years. 



POPULATION , CONSUMPTION OF WATER and PER CENT OF SERVICES METERED 

IN THE 

METROPOLITAN WATER DISTRICT 
AS SUPPLIED IN 1917 
FROM 1890 TO 1917 































Li) 

o 
























































c — 




_Q (U 
















































</> 


-ojj 




o.^ 
















































;, l- 


22 m- 




















































■°^ 


V~ c 




I- t) O 
















































c, 


t..2 




-f^ > — 
















































.2 li 


oK. 




= 10 ■ 
















































ro ro 


ro D 




c» to 




































r 












a>5 


"£ c 




— o 




































o 












"£c " 


<u o 




\—%^ o 




































-H 














"g 




«:*£ 








i_ 




























CP 












C"-= 


m o 










S p 




























+j 












n , a. 


in 


fe I 


30 — 


2 


c c 






TO E 




























<o 












1/1 i 




a. ' 










<Ul/> 




























c 


o 










5« / 








„. 








c -^ 






























-H 1 
1/1 








A 


2 x 






/ 




\ 






^•f 




























+-• 


O 

nn 








^>y 










/ 






































to 








<^ 


120- 








/ 


-120 


\> 






o* 


























, 5 


•- 
















> 




\ 




u 


JC 




























n> 


■a 




£?— 


















V \ 


































a; 


5 




-c$^ 






- 


'" 










\ \ 




/ 


\ 




/ 
























2 


c 




<3L- / 








/ 














x^_ 


/ 


\ 


^~ 


























a 




<&z 




-as 


^-D4Y 


/ 














" x « 


' 1 10- 


\^ 


I.I00.0C 








no 


















o 








1 IU 


' 
















^ \ 






,' 




















<u 




Pf 




! ■*/ 






















\ 


.'\ 


>' 




















Q 


VJ/ 




c^' 






















\ \ 


s 


\ 


* 
















V 




IM 


_G^7^ 




oS 


■ 


























\ t s 
















-H> 


<3v 










c&! 


















,000.00 








liT^ 


















'^ 


^/ 










<d,^- 
















































>?/ 








V^ 














































— 




V 








.>>/ 
















































^ ^^ 








S - ' 












^^ 
















— ■ ' 


\ 


















\ cP>^ 








\ 


/ 








\ 




,000- 


















\ 


-90- 


























$1 






..» t 


^voj 






















\ 




























i * 




?o^ 




















































<5^ 


























































^^i 




























. 




























•»*-■' 


s^r 




















































6CM 




<$£ 


^^^ 


— 800, 


000 — 




















































< 


>^-^ 


























































^^f 










































■ 10 
















^ i 
i 
























































i 

' -tl 
























































'^—10 


0,000- 


7-7< 


) 
























































s 


» 
































^ 


<\0 
























* — 
































&*} 


S^ 


















" 




/ 


■"" 


»' 
































j^V 
























/ 


































<&' 


























/ 


-60- 






























cC* 


fy i 


























> 
































c&y 
























































ctf£ 


ov„ 


r?n 


























• 




























o^9. 




0) 
























• 

-* 


-50- 




























:::=: -l 


) — 





























1890 



1892 



1894 



1896 



1898 



1900 



1902 



1904 



1906 



1908 



1910 



1912 



1914 



1916 



1918 



1920 



AVERAGE RATE OF CONSUMPTION OF WATER 
IN THE METROPOLITAN WATER DISTRICT 
FOR THE ENTIRE DAY 

AND 

FOR THREE HOURS BETWEEN I AND 4 AT NIGHT 







Z 




z 


bJ 


2 




O 




z 




H 


Q. 






o 




o 




< 


<r 


o 




o 




z 


O 


z 
o 


1— 

z 


nr* 


(9 


> 

a: 


UJ 


UJ 

to 


to 


>- 
o 


1— 
tD 


UJ 

a: 


o 

2 


X 


H 


< 


UJ 


a: 


Z 


IxJ 


z 


_l 


^ 


z 


z 


UJ 


t- 


to 


T 


h- 


X 


-2: 


o 


UJ 


< 




_J 


> 


J 


V 


o 


<*■ 


-< 




o 


1- 


3Z 


5= 


r> 


cc 


UJ 


UJ 


£ 


03 


z 


3C 


UJ 


—I 


tO 


tO 


O 


to 


o 


<c 


ce 


cu 



UJ O 

to a: 

o o 

cc u_ 

-J Q 

UJ UJ 

2 2 



z 

UJ 

a 

< 

2 



z 
o 
I-, 






u 

CD 

a. 



03 

ro 
O 



O- 



to 

c 
o 

"To 



160 



150 



140 



130 



120 



110 



100 



90 



80 



70 



60 



2 50 



a_ 
E 

to 
c: 
o 



4- 
o 



CD 



40 



30 



20 



10 



,1908 



Dec.3l, 

Dec 31,1917 59.9 753 



Average for the District, for the entire Day, 



Averaqe for the District for three 



hours 



between i and 4 at night 190 8 



908 




- 



160 



150 



140 



130 



120 



<u 



ru 



5.7 31.0 100.0 9.6 33.1 36.6 12.8 33.9 89.2 29.9 50.1 9.7 



Percentage of Services Metered 



58.7 99.2 74.2 99.5 99.8 



91.4 100.0 76.5 



17.8 



33.1 96.3 



96.8 



Average Rate of Consumption for Entire Day, 1917 ...... 

• " between I and 4 at night 1917 . 

Average Rate of Consumption for Entire Day . 1908 

» v p » between I and 4 at night ; t908 . 



,zzm 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



103 



*ZI6T 

'Xg I8qiII808Q p9.I9q.9UI 
S90IAI9g JO '%U9£J J9<J 


nmujokdooo^oooohooi^o 

OONNNOTHOOlOOOOOlOOHmO 


o 

CM 


9iltD«OOHOO»OOOOOlOO)iOO 

lONOJOllOOlOONOOOOOOCSNO 

Hi- 1 HHi-lH i— 1 1— 1 


CM 
N 


jaquiaoaQ es^ 


£161 '18 

UI SI9q.9J\[ 


H00NNOfflOTtl«0:C0OlOC5)05rtOX5 

NiNoeOKHOiofflmom'^miNcoioiM 

OOCOHlOHCOtolOHHOffltDIXNlOOl 

MONlOM05fflT)?C<5COCONCNtiHiHTH i— 1 
CO 1— 1 


OS 
OO 
lO 
r-T 

CO 
rH 


"ZT6I 

-UI809Q 9SQ U1 


'18 ^q 

S90TAJ9g 


N©(DOOCONONTtlCXlC100«DNOS<-lOlO 
"50lNl>iHNO(Dlf5COOmHiJ<N-*a3<N 
MiOHHOOltOHtOHrtOOCONNNO) 

m co oo io cooTc© rH"rH co«o cmco i— i i— i i-h t-T 

O 1— 1 


o> 

CO 

cm" 

OO 




to 
H 
o 

M 

« 

PS 


W 

H 

^ 05 

si 

a 


02 
-r= 

o 
■H 


N-rf4r-INCOrHr±llOCN|COlOCOCOCOOOOilOCO 

NHaiHQOiceooOxjcRffliNOHNioto 

ONC-IOOrHi}fO>NCOCCNaieOOlJ5CX|(D 

co c^Ti-Ti— i co e<T i—i r-i t-T t-i 

1— t 


co 
O 
O 

rH* 

CO 


i-( 

o> 

i-l 


IOifOOOHl(5ClM«NOOO)iHHN050> 
NlOOOlO-^lOtONkONNN rtOMINUJ 
Oi i-H CM CM i— 1 tH t-1 i—l 


CM 

CO 

cm" 


1908 to 
1916, 

inclu- 
sive. 


NOrtC»«©OOCOCBiHinOONlON(N®N 
lOtDr- 1 lO IO CO r- li— 1 tJ( OO (N CN1 i- 1 Oi r- 1 OS CM O 
tH_0 O O CO OS CM_OS tO rH CM_N OJ CM OS -cH CM CO 
CM CM" i—l iH CM CM i— Ti—Tt— 1 


rH 
CO 

CO 






H 

CO 

IH 


m 
Is 
O 

H 


SONl>ii(COlO(NOlO'- IOOOOcDCOOO-<HCOCO 

■*Ncc*ioco'*iooiotoai , *OHinNffl 

10_0 HrtCSOJ "^l 00 C 5 CM. CO N Oi CO O lO CM CO 
CO CMrH rH CO CM i-H rH tH? r-l 


OS 

O 

1— 1 

oo" 

CO 




OTiHOiCOHWtONiOOOOOOKICONNCS 
rH»OCM»OrHOOOiNCOCONNCOi— 1 OS CO rH lO 
rH rH CM i—( t— 1 T— 1 iH 

i— 1 


CO 

o 
oq_ 

CM 


1908 to 
1916, 

inclu- 
sive. 


tDcOCOtOOOtOCOOMCOOOOCOONrtN 
OCMlOOOi— HOTtHNNOOOXNCOCRCNU-ICDO 
t|h_os H O O ffi N N 1> O H N CO IN COW 1M (D 

IQ HHrl" CO CM 1-4.-I-1-I 


CO 
CO 

CO 

lO 
CO 


i9qxn909( 
PIO uo q.9 

-9J SJ9q.9 


I oq. s 
S9q o; 

H jo 


£161 '18 

90TAJ9g 

p9imb 

jgqiun^j 


OOOOOOOOO O I OO 1 ooo 
MH>#O(MOfflffi00 | lO. OlO CM CO i— 1 
N IH rH TjllO CO N rH CO lO O CO CO rH CM 
00 rH CM" CM CM Hi- 1 1-4 1—1 

co- 


o 
o 
o 

N 
IO 




Meters set on Old Services. 

i 


- co 
""3 

O 

H 


rHOOOCMrHOiOOCMlO I -* | CBOl | MON 
rH N CM O rH CO CO 05 O CO tH i— 1 H rH ■<*! 
incOHOlO-tlOiON 02 Oi CO co cm rH 

£j rH~ CO CM"-* co"cm"i-h" r-Ti-T 


00 

1— 1 

o 

co" 


i-l 

0) 

i-H 


NM | HCOCCM | N | | | NlS | >OIO | 
rH CO CM CD t- CO i-l lO 
CM rH CM 1-1 


1— 1 

CO 

Oa 
i— l 


CO 

iH 

en 

1-1 


CM i*4 | CM N CD i— 1 i—l CM | 1 | I 1-4 1 OS CM 1- 

O CO CO r-l CO 1-4 CO 
OO rH CM 

to 


o 

CD 
CO 


IA 
iH 
O 


OOOS | COlOH I NCO | | | ^IM | NM | 
i— ICO rH CM 1— 1 1— 1 N CO iO 
-*-* CM CM 

»o" 


OO 
CM 

IO 
CO 


•r-l 
iH 


NINMIOiHMit/- | N | | 1 COO | COW 1 
OSCN (DO) CO O -rJ4rH ' 
00 rH CM rH r*4 rH 

"0~ 


rH 
rH 
rH 
N 


■ 04 
i-l 


OOONMWNN | N I Oi I |C5|rH-rH| 
OO COCOrH lO rH CO 
CO lO CM CO rH CO rH 
Ui 


>o 

CO 

t^ 

N 


o> 

1-1 


CMOO|CMlOOCO|-rH|rH| 1 N 1 ION 1 
CM OO MHO io CO lO OS rH 
O •* rH CM O rH CM CM 
CO rH 


<M 

CO 
N 

OO 


1-J 
i-U 
0> 
i-l 


NONNlOOOOlOS! I N I CO IO 1 COOOCO 
CON OSCOCON N CM lO 00 rH rH 
rH lO O CM CO i— 1 i-Hi—4 i— 1 

CO rH r-T 


o 

OO 
00 

o 


1908 to 
1910, 

inclu- 
sive. 


CO rH CO CO O rti OS rH 05 | t — IrHN | Oi co rH 

(OlOHMNHMNN CM OS CM CO Oi CO 
0_00 rH N-OOOOcoiOCO CM OOlO CM rH 
rH rH H CO CM rH 


1— I 
co 
1— 1 

CO 

CN 


•1139^ 1 

PIO no V 

-9J SJ9q.9 


S9q oo 
H J 


90TAJ9g 

\ paamb 
jgquin^ 


COi— IrHOCMOOSOJOO |IC I OlO ICMCOrH 
NHHiflOMNHM io OcC COrHCM 
CM -rJ4 CMCMCMl-HrHrH rH 

rH 


CO 
rH 
1—4 

CO 




« . 

H O 






-r= 

o 
H 


Boston, . 
Somerville, 
Maiden, . 
Chelsea, . 
Everett, . 
Quincy, . 
Medford, 
Melrose, . 
Revere, . 
Watertown, 
Arlington, 
Milton, . 
Winthrop, 
Stoneham, 
Belmont, 
Lexington, 
Nahant, . 
Swampscott, 



Pi 


O 


Oi 


fl 




o 


CD 
O 


«rH 
O 


> 


Tl 


CD 
m 


.2 







ci 


u, 


r£n 


03 



a 
a 

"B 



a 

CO 
XI 
CD 



O CD OS 

r«H S* ^ 

t) CD 
>» 

a 



11 

c3 >* 
<D Pi 



^J 



2 -o 



- s <5 

IB J H 
ft ^8 



CO 



CD fn 



- ^ ft 

I.SS 
"S 3 "3 

-9 rd CN! 

3 r2 ^ 



a 
"SO 



104 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



During 1917 2,803 service pipes and 4,593 meters were installed 
in the municipalities supplied from the Metropolitan Water Works, 
and at the close of the year 182,139 service pipes and 131,589 
meters were in use; 72.20 per cent, of all the service pipes had been 
provided with meters; in eight of the municipalities all of the 
service pipes were equipped with meters and in three other munici- 
palities over 99 per cent, of the service pipes were equipped with 
meters. 

Water Supplied Outside of Metropolitan Water District. 

During the year 484,052,000 gallons of water were supplied from 
the Metropolitan Water Works for use outside the Metropolitan 
Water District as follows : — 



Places supplied. 



Total 
Quantity 
(Gallons). 



Average 

Quantity 

(Gallons 

per Day). 1 



Number of 

Days on 

which Water 

was 

supplied. 



Amounts 

charged 

for Water 

supplied. 



Westborough State Hospital, . 
Town of Framingham: — 

From Sudbury Aqueduct, . 

From Filter-gallery at Farm Pond, 
United States Government: — 

Peddock's Island, 
Town of Saugus, .... 



57,387,000 

182,300,000 
207,800,000 

31,859,000 
4,706,000 



157,000 

499,452 
569,300 

87,300 
12,900 



354 

364 
365 

365 
365 



$1,721 61 

4,773 72 

1,833 25 
270 00 



1 For the entire year. 

Protection of. Water Works Structures. 

Measures which were undertaken for the protection of the water 
works structures from irresponsible or malicious persons in Febru- 
ary, 1916, because of the unsettled conditions, have been continued, 
and since war was declared additional precautions have been taken 
which have required the service of a substantial number of men 
and a material increase in the maintenance expenditures. 



Quality of the Water. 

The yearly average results of the chemical analyses made by 
the State Department of Health since 1892 and of the biological 
and bacteriological examinations made in the Metropolitan Water 
Works laboratory, of water from service taps in Boston since 1898, 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 105 

are given in tables on pages 191 to 194. The results of chemical 
and biological examinations of the water from various parts of the 
system during the year 1917 are given in tables on pages 185 to 
190. 

Engineeking. 

In connection with the maintenance of the works the engineering 
force has made plans, estimates and reports for various projects 
and improvements; has made record plans of water works lands and 
structures, surveys and plans of sanitary conditions at premises on 
the watersheds and for land purchases and takings; has tested 
meters; made photographs, blueprints and analyses of coal and oil; 
calculated yields of watersheds; made current meter gagings; kept 
hydraulic and meteorological records; summarized power station and 
pumping station records; cared for the recording pressure gages and 
supervised various operations carried on by the department. 

Appended to this report are tables giving additional information 
relating to the operations of the Metropolitan Water Works for the 
year 1917 and the usual water works statistics. 

Respectfully submitted, 



Boston, January 2, 1918. 



WILLIAM E. FOSS, 

Chief Engineer. 



106 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 



REPORT OF CHIEF ENGINEER OF SEWERAGE 

WORKS. 



To the Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board. 

Gentlemen: — The following report of the operations of the Met- 
ropolitan Sewerage Works for the year ending December 31, 1917, 
is respectfully submitted : — 

Organization. 

The Chief Engineer has charge of the design and construction of 
all new works, and of the maintenance and operation of all the 
works controlled by the Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board 
for removing sewage from the twenty-six municipalities which com- 
prise the Metropolitan Sewerage districts. 

The following assistants have been employed during the year : — 

Henry T. Stiff, Division Engineer, in charge of of- 
fice and drafting room and of the 
construction work. 

Clarence A. Moore, Assistant Engineer, in charge of 

maintenance studies and records 
and of construction work on the 
North Metropolitan System. 

Arthur F. F. Haskell, .... Assistant Engineer, in charge of 

survey work and field work in 
connection with the Wellesley 
Extension construction. 

Ralph W. Loud, . . . . . Assistant Engineer, in charge of 

survey work and field work in 
connection with the Reading Ex- 
tension construction. 

George W. Wood, Assistant Engineer, on Deer Island 

Outfall Extension. 

In addition to the above, the number of engineering and other 
assistants employed during the year .was 19, which includes 3 in- 
strumentmen, 7 inspectors, 2 draftsmen, 5 rodmen and engineering 
assistants and 2 stenographers. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



107 



METROPOLITAN SEWERAGE DISTRICTS. 

Areas and Populations. 

During the year no changes have been made in the extent of the 
Metropolitan Sewerage districts and they remain as given in the 
last annual report. 

The populations of the districts, as given in the following table, 
are based on the census of 1915. 



Table showing Ultimate Contributing Areas and Present Estimated Populations 
within the Metropolitan Sewerage Districts, as of December 81, 1917. 



City ok Town. 


Area (Square 
Miles). 


Estimated 
Population. 




Arlington, 


5.20 


16,600 




Belmont, - 


















4.66 


9,140 




Boston (portions 


of),, 
















3.45 


109,640 




Cambridge, . 
Chelsea, 


















6.11 
2.24 


111,890 
46,930 


S3 
e8 


Everett, 


















3.34 


40,240 


."£ 


Lexington, i . 


















5.11 


4,220 




Maiden, 


















5.07 


51,660 




Medford, 


















8.35 


33,970 


2s 


Melrose, 
Reading, 


















3.73 
9.82 


17,710 
7,520 


£ 


Revere, 
Somerville, . 
Stoneham, . 
Wakefield, . 
Winchester, . 
Winthrop, 
Woburn, 


















5.86 
3.96 
5.50 
7.65 
5.95 
1.61 
12.71 


28,710 
91,990 
7,720 
13,500 
10,610 
14,320 
16,850 


















inn i n 


, . coo oort 










Boston (portions of), 
















24.96 


270,380 





Brookline, . 
















6.81 


36,300 


o 


Dedham, 1 . 


















9.40 


11,810 


£.2 


Milton, 


















12.59 


9,150 


o 


Newton, 
Quincy, 
Waltham, 


















16.88 
12.56 
13.63 


44,980 
43,660 
31,550 


OQ 


Watertown, . 


















4.04 


18,210 




Wellesley, 














•. *« 


9.89 


7,030 




1 in 7fi 


/(7o 070 




























211.08 


1,106,290 



1 Part of town. 



108 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



METROPOLITAN SEWERS. 

Sewers Purchased and Constructed and their Connections. 

During the year there have been built 1.527 miles of Metropolitan 
sewer within the sewerage districts, so that there are now 113.011 
miles of Metropolitan sewers. Of this total, 9.642 miles of sewers, 
with the Quincy pumping station, have been purchased from cities 
and towns of the districts. The remaining 103.369 miles of sewers 
and other works have been constructed by the Metropolitan boards. 

The locations, lengths and sizes of these sewers are given in the 
following tables, together with other data referring to the public and 
special connections with the systems : — 



North Metropolitan Sewerage System. 



Location, Length and Sizes of Sewers 


, with Public and Special Connections 








D3 


■ i 

© S • 


Special Connections. 






8 


So 1-1 




,P, r 


City or Town. 


Size of Sewers. 


.2 




Character or Location of 


.2 
© a 






+3 

a 
© 


ublic 
tion 
ber 


Connection. 


c ft 






Hi 


P4 




'A 


Boston: — 












Deer Island, 


4'0"to9'0", 


1.653 


4 


Shoe factory, .... 


1 


East Boston, 


9'0"tol'0", 


5.467 


25 


Middlebrook Wool-combing 
Co., 


1 


Charlestown, 


6'7"X7'5"to l'O", . 


3.292 


14 | 


Navy Yard 

Private building, . 

Club house, .... 


8 
1 
1 


Winthrop, 


9'0", 


?, 864 


13- 


Fire Department Station, 
Private building, . 


1 

1 










Rendering works, . 


1 
1 


Chelsea, 


8'4"X9'2"to 15", . 


5.230 


13< 


Metropolitan Water Works 
blow-off, 

Chelsea Water Works blow- 
off, 

Metropolitan Water Works 
blow-off, .... 

Cameron Appliance Co., 

Shultz-Goodwin Co., 


1 

2 

1 
1 
1 


Everett, 


8'2"X8' 10"to4'8"X5' 1", 


2.925 


8' 


Andrews- Wasgatt Co., . 
National Metallic Bed Co., . 

Factory, .... 
New England Structural Co., 


1 
1 
1 
2 
1 


Lexington, 1 . 


— "~ 


— 


1 

[ 


Metropolitan Water Works 


— 


Maiden, . 


4'6"X4' 10" to l'O", . 


5.844* 


34 1 


blow-off, .... 
Private buildings, . 


1 
181 



1 Lexington, although admitted to the Metropolitan Sewerage System in 1897, has not contributed 
sewage to the Metropolitan trunk lines until the present year as no local sewerage system had been con- 
structed. Connection was made with the Metropolitan sewers September 11, 1916. 

2 Includes 1.84 miles of sewer purchased from the city of Maiden. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



109 



North Metropolitan Sewerage System — Concluded. 

Location, Length and Sizes of Sewers, with Public and Special Connections 

— Concluded. 







m 
ffi 




Special Connections. 






3 


g 8^ 

a QJ2 




.ad 


Citt or Town. 


Size of Sewers. 






Character or Location of 










ublk 
tion 
ber 


Connection. 


S ft 






^ 


P4 




& 








< 


Private buildings, . 


. 114 


Melrose, . 


4' 6"X4' 10" to 10", . 


6.0991 


38' 

> 


Factory, .... 

Railroad station, 

Park Department bath house 

Harvard dormitories, 

Slaughterhouse, 




Cambridge, . 


5' 2"X5' 9" to 1' 3", . 


7.209 


45 

> 


City Hospital, 

Street railway machine shop 

Private buildings, . 

Tannery, 

Slaughterhouses (3), 

Car-house, 

Somerville Water Works blow- 




Somerville, 


6'5"X7'2"to 10", . 


3.577 


12- 

> 


off, 
Street railway power-house, 
Stable, .... 
Rendering works, . 
Railroad scale pit, . 
Armory building, . 




Medford, 


4'8"X5' l"to 10", . 


5.713 


24. 

> 


Private buildings, . 
Stable, .... 
Police substation, . 
Tanneries, 
Private buildings, . 
Gelatine factory, . 
Watch-hand factory, 




Winchester, . 


4' 6" to 1' 3", . 


9.470 


25. 


Stable, .... 

Railroad station, . 

Felt works, 

Town Hall, . 

Bay State Saw & Tool Co., . 




Stoneham, 


1' 3" to 10", 


.0.010 


4 


- - 




Woburn, 


1' 10"X2'4" to 1' 3", . 


0.933 


3 

f 


Glue factory, . 
Private buildings, . 


159 


Arlington, 


1' 6" to 10", 


3.5202 


42 


Railroad station, . 

Car-house, 

Post office, 




Belmont, « 


- 


- 


3 
1 
3 


- 


- 


Revere, . 


4' 0" to 15", 


0.136 


— — 


- 




63. 942 4 


312 


541 



1 Includes .736 of a mile of sewer purchased from the city of Melrose. 

2 Includes 2.631 miles of sewer purchased from the town of Arlington. 

3 The Metropolitan sewer extends but a few feet into the towns of Belmont and Wakefield. 

' Includes 2.787 miles of Mystic Valley sewer in Medford, Winchester and Woburn, running parallel with 
the Metropolitan sewer. 



110 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



South Metropolitan Sewerage System. 
Location, Length and Sizes of Sewers, with Public and Special Connections. 







.2 


® £ • 


Special Connections. 






1 


C3 O *— 




.3d 


City or Town. 


Size of Sewers. 


,£3 


— nnco 


Character or Location of 


t- "-+3 






So 
a 


ublic 
tion: 
ber 


Connection. 


S a 
5° 






tl 


Ph 




5 










Tufts Medical School, . 


1 


Boston: — 
Back Bay, . 








Private house, 


1 


6' 6" to 3' 9", 


1.5001 


16 < 


Administration Building, 
Boston Park Department, . 


1 










Simmons College buildings, . 


1 










Art Museum, .... 


2 


Brighton, . 


5'9"X6'0" to 12", . 


6.0102 


15 


Abattoir, .... 
Chocolate works, . 
Machine shop, 


3 
2 
1 


Dorchester, 


3'X4'to2'6"X2' 7", . 


2.870» 


13< 

> 


Paper mill, .... 
Private buildings, . 
Edison Electric Company Sta- 
tion, . . 
Mattapan Paper Mills, . 


1 
3 

1 

1 


Hyde Park, 


10'7"Xll'7"to4'0"X4'l", 


4.527 


18- 


Private buildings, . 
Fairview Cemetery buildings, 


2 
1 


Roxbury, 


6'6"X7'to 4'0", 


1.430 


( 


Caledonia Grove buildings, . 


1 


West Roxbury, . 


9'3"X10'2"to 12", . 


7.600 


" 


Parental School, 

Lutheran Evangelical Church, 

Private buildings, . 


1 
1 

4 


Brookline, 


6'6"X7' 0"to 8", . . . 


2.540 4 


12' 


Private building, . 


2 


Dedham, 


4'X4' l"to2' 10"X3' 1", . 


2.839 


7 


Dedham Carpet Mills, 


1 


Hull, s . 


60" pipe, .... 


0.750 


- 


- - 


- 


Milton, . 


ll'X12'to8", 


3.600 


23 


Private buildings, . 


2 


Newton, 


4'2"X4' 9" to 1'3", . 


2.911 


7 


Private houses, 


7 


Quincy, . 


11'3"X12' 6" to 24" pipe, . 


6.845 


14 


Metropolitan Water Works 
blow-off, .... 


1 


Waltham, 


3'6"X4'0", 


0.001 


1 

f 


Factories, .... 


2 


Watertown, 


4'2"X4'9"to 12", . 


0.750 6 


'} 


Stanley Motor Carriage Co ., . 
Knights of Pythias building, 


1 
1 


Needham, 5 


2'0"X2'3"to2'3"X2'6", . 


4.896 




_ - 


- 


Wellesley, 7 




- 


- 




- 




49.069 


147 


45 



1 Includes .355 of a mile of sewer purchased from the city of Boston. 

2 Includes .446 of a mile of pipe and concrete sewers built for the use of the city of Boston; also .026 
of a mile of sewer purchased from the town of Watertown. 

3 Includes 1.24 miles of sewer purchased from the city of Boston. 

4 Includes .158 of a mile of pipe sewer built for the use of the town of Brookline. 
6 Hull and Needham are not parts of the Metropolitan Sewerage District. 

6 Includes .025 of a mile of sewer purchased from the town of Watertown. 

7 The Metropolitan sewer extends but a few feet into the town of Wellesley. 



Information relating to areas, populations, local sewer connections 
and other data for the Metropolitan Sewerage districts appears in 
the following table : — 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



Ill 



North Metropolitan Sewerage District. 



Area 
(Square 
Miles). 



100.32 



Estimated 

Total 
Population. 



Miles of 

Local Sewer 

connected. 



633,220 



769.92 



Estimated 

Population 

contributing 

Sewage. 



568,075 



Ratio of 

Contributing 

Population 

to Total 
Population 
(Per Cent.). 



Connections made 
with Metro- 
politan Sewers. 



Public. 



312 



Special. 



541 



South Metropolitan Sewerage District. 


110.76 


473,070 


653.17 


342,715 


72.4 


147 


45 




Both Metropolitan Sewerage Districts. 






211.08 


1,106,290 


1,423.09 


910,790 


82.3 


459 


586 



Of the estimated gross population of 1,106,290 on December 31, 
1917, 910,790, representing 82.3 per cent., were on that date con- 
tributing sewage to the Metropolitan sewers, through a total length 
of 1423.09 miles of local sewers owned by the individual cities and 
towns of the districts. 

These sewers are connected with the Metropolitan systems by 459 
public and 586 special connections. During the current year there 
has been an increase of 20.02 miles of local sewers connected with the 
Metropolitan systems, and 7 public and 16 special connections. 



CONSTRUCTION. 
NORTH METROPOLITAN SEWERAGE SYSTEM. 

Section 1. — Deer Island Outfall Extension. 

The contract and general character of this work are described in 
last year's report. 

Work was resumed on this contract July 9, 1917, and was carried 
on to completion on December 3, 1917. Much delay was occasioned 
by the unusually stormy weather during the autumn months. 

Stone foundation, consisting of granite sills about 2 feet by 2| feet 
by 10 feet, was used between Station 2+58 and Station 0+91. 
From Station 0+91 to Station 0+0 oak piles 11 feet long were 
driven in bents of two and were capped by 10-inch by 10-inch 
hard pine secured to the tops of the piles by drift bolts. Two of 



112 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

these bents were placed under each 9-foot length of 84-inch cast- 
iron pipe. 

Owing to the loose character of the sand and gravel, the trench 
was dredged to a width on top of about 60 feet. Before back- 
filling stone riprap buttresses were built on either side against the 
84-inch pipe at stations 0+81, 1+25 and 1+60 to prevent dis- 
placement while backfilling was being done. A sleeve was intro- 
duced in the pipe line at Station 0+32. 

The 84-inch cast-iron pipe and specials were covered on the out- 
side with a iV- mcn coating of bitumastic enamel. 

Extension to Reading. 

No work has yet been done in constructing the Metropolitan 
sewer extension to Reading as authorized by Chapter 159 of the 
General Acts of 1916. 

Several attempts have been made to place contracts for the upper 
two sections but owing to the abnormal conditions of the market 
for supplies and labor, the prices bid have been so much above the 
original estimated cost that no contracts could be made. 

The estimate of cost for this work was made in 1914. 

SOUTH METROPOLITAN SEWERAGE SYSTEM. 

Wellesley Extension. 

The Wellesley Extension of the High-level Sewer comprises sec- 
tions 98 to 106 inclusive. Of these sections 102, 103, 104, 105 and 
106 are wholly completed and Section 98 is about 80 per cent, 
completed. 

Section 98. — Wellesley Extension. 

The particulars of this section and the contracts concerning the 
same are given in last year's report. 

Work has been carried on throughout the year and 2,518 feet of 
sewer have been completed. Great difficulty has been experienced 
in the work owing to the loose, wet, fine sands encountered. The 
ground waters have been very high throughout the year and the 
marshes were flooded in August and October so that work had to be 
abandoned temporarily. It has been necessary to drive 3-inch 
matched sheeting nearly all the distance completed. In most places 
it was driven 7 to 9 feet below grade and the concrete sewer built 
on a gravel platform. Considerable ground water was found. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 113 

Ledge was encountered between Station 9+84 and Station 11+87 
and gravel bottom between Station 11+87 and Station 12+60. 
Reinforcing steel has been used in the concrete except where ledge 
and gravel bottoms were found. 

A temporary corduroy road has been built along the side of the 
trench leading easterly from Bridge Street. 

It is expected this section will be completed in the fall of 1918. 

Section 99. — Wellesley Extension. 

This section consists of about 1,300 feet of rock tunnel and 2,000 
feet of trench in which is to be constructed a 33-inch by 36-inch 
concrete sewer. A small amount only of construction work on this 
section has been accomplished. An attempt to make a contract 
for this work in 1916 and another in August, 1917, failed as the 
prices bid were far in excess of the appropriation. 

A small portion of this section extending from Station 0+0 to 
Station 0+66 has been constructed by G. M. Bryne in connection 
with the construction of Section 98. This work was done to com- 
plete that part of the Wellesley Extension extending through the 
fine sands at this locality. The trench at Station 0+66 reached a 
bottom of hard ground. 

Section 100. — Wellesley Extension. 

No attempt has been made to place this section of 3,900 feet of 
33-inch by 36-inch concrete sewer in trench under contract as the 
appropriation was insufficient. 

Section 101. — Wellesley Extension. 

Plans were prepared and on September 26, 1917, bids were opened 
for the construction of this section of 3,840 feet of 33-inch by 36- 
inch concrete sewer in trench including a crossing of the Charles 
River. 

No contract was made as all bids, being in excess of the appro- 
priation, were rejected. 

Section 102. — Wellesley Extension. 

This section and the contract for the same were described in last 
year's report. 

Ledge was encountered at various points from Station 9+50 to 



114 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

Station 18+00, from Station 23+50 to Station 27+50 and from 
Station 54+0 to Station 66+60. Excavations below grade were 
necessary from Station 0+0 to Station 3+12, from Station 5+10 to 
Station 8+0, from Station 30+36 to Station 31+20 and from Station 
41 + 10 to Station 43+50. These were refilled with special con- 
crete except from Station 30+36 to Station 31+20 which was re- 
filled with gravel. A small amount of ground water was encountered. 
Masonry work on this section was completed December 15, 1917. 
There remains some grading and cleaning up which will be com- 
pleted when the weather permits. 

MAINTENANCE. 
SCOPE OF WORK AND FORCE EMPLOYED. 

The maintenance of the Metropolitan Sewerage System includes 
the operation of 7 pumping stations, the Nut Island screen-house 
and 113.011 miles of Metropolitan sewers, receiving the discharge 
from 1,423.09 miles of town and city sewers at 459 points, together 
with the care and study of inverted siphons under streams and in 
the harbor. 

The permanent maintenance force includes 160 men, of whom 96 
are employed on the North System and 64 on the South System. 
These are subdivided as follows: North Metropolitan System, 58 
engineers and other employees at the pumping stations; on main- 
tenance, care of sewer lines, buildings and grounds, 38 men, including 
foremen; South Metropolitan System, 35 engineers and other em- 
ployees within the pumping stations; and 29 men, including fore- 
men, on maintenance, care of sewer lines, buildings and grounds. 

The regular work of this department, in addition to the operation 
of the pumping stations, has consisted of routine work of cleaning 
and inspecting sewers and siphons, caring for tide gates, regulators 
and overflows, measuring flow in sewers, inspection of connections 
to the Metropolitan sewers, care of pumping stations and other 
buildings and grounds, and the maintenance of the ferry at Shirley 
Gut for transporting employees and supplies in connection with the 
operation of the Deer Island pumping station. 

In addition to these regular duties other work has been done by 
this department as follows : — 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 115 

Deer Island Pumping Station. 

During this year there has been constructed at this station a new 
masonry office annex 12 feet by 16 feet with reinforced concrete 
roof. This adjoins the back of the original engine house and re- 
places a wooden building formerly used as an office. 

The brick walls of the economizer building at this station have 
been raised 6 feet and a reinforced-concrete roof has been placed 
over the same. This gives head room enough to make repairs to 
economizer tubes. 

The shaft of the impeller wheel of pump No. 3 has been refitted 
to the wheel and new tubes were inserted in the wheel. A new 
bronze sleeve was put on the shaft of this pump. 

The lower bearing of pump No. 4, which was formerly of lignum- 
vitse with no method of adjustment, has been changed to a bab- 
bitted brass bearing with adjusting screws to take up the wear. 

All work was done by maintenance employees. 

East Boston Pumping Station. 

A 1,500-gallon steel tank for sea water for condensation purposes 
has been placed in this station. By the use of this tank all engines 
can be run through low tide without the use of condensation water 
from the public water supply. 

All work was done by maintenance employees. 

Charlestown Pumping Station. 

A new well for sea water for condensing purposes has been con- 
structed outside the station. This replaces one built in 1895. 

All work was done by maintenance employees. 

Changes in the location and elevation of the street in front of 
this station in connection with the construction of the new highway 
bridge across Mystic River have been completed during the year. 
The street has been moved 30 feet to the westward and has been 
raised about 5 feet at the southerly end of the pumping station lot. 

Ward Street Pumping Station. 
During the year two 175 horse-power upright boilers of the Dean 
type have been placed in this station. These were constructed and 



116 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

placed in position by the D. M. Dillon Steam Boiler Works of 
Fitchburg. 

All connecting piping and flues have been completed by the main- 
tenance employees. 

Seattle Street Conduit Grossing. 

Arrangements were made with the city of Boston whereby the 
Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board changed the size and 
form of the Metropolitan sewer at about Station 14 of Section D, 
Brighton, and built a short length of storm water conduit across 
the Metropolitan sewer at this point. The Board is to be reim- 
bursed by the city for all expenditures. 

Nut Island. 

At this place a new reinforced concrete boat-house and tool- 
house with wooden roof has been constructed. This is situated on 
the easterly side of the island near high-water mark and has di- 
mensions of 56 feet by 23 feet. 

All work was done by maintenance employees. 

Government Use of Old 24-inch Quincy Force Main. 

At the new shipbuilding plant at Squantum, Quincy, the United 
States Government has installed a special sewerage system and 
pumping plant. Permission was given by the Board to use such 
part as is needed of the abandoned 24-inch cast-iron main in Squan- 
tum Street leading to the Boston Main Drainage System at Squan- 
tum Head. 

A connection was made to this force main at about Station 
132+70. No sewage has yet been discharged through this line. 

Study of Sewerage in Mill Brook Valley in Arlington. 

The following study of the sewerage conditions and needs of the 
towns of Arlington and Lexington has been made in accordance with 
legislative resolve, chapter 22 of 1917, approved March 8, 1917, which 
reads — 

Resolved, That the metropolitan water and sewerage board shall investigate 
the condition and capacity of the present metropolitan sewer in the town of 
Arlington with especial reference to its capacity to receive and dispose of the 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 117 

sewage of that part of the town of Arlington tributary to the same, and of the 
town of Lexington. The said board is also authorized and directed to report a 
plan for the new sewer contemplated by section four of chapter five hundred and 
twenty of the acts of the year eighteen hundred and ninety-seven, in the valley 
of Mill or Sucker brook, so situated as to serve all parts of the said valley and 
such adjacent territory as, in the opinion of the board, should be served by the 
same. The board may employ such engineering or other assistance as may be 
necessary, and may incur an expense not exceeding one thousand dollars in 
carrying out the provisions of this resolve. The board shall report to the present 
general court not later than the first day of May, with plans and estimates of 
the cost of such construction as it may recommend. 

At present the towns are served by a metropolitan trunk sewer 
extending the entire length of Arlington and terminating at the 
easterly boundary of Lexington. This sewer was in part purchased 
from the town of Arlington and in part constructed by the Metro- 
politan Sewerage District. 

The sewer constructed by the District extends from the Alewife 
Brook pumping station to a point in Arlington across Alewife 
Brook known as Section 48, and that portion from Lowell Street 
near Massachusetts Avenue to the Arlington-Lexington town line, 
known as Section 53. The portion between Section 48 and Section 
53 was purchased from the town and is known as Section 52. 

Section 48 was constructed in 1894, and is a part of the original 
trunk lines of the Metropolitan Sewerage District. 

Upon the admission of part of the town of Lexington to the 
Sewerage District, Section 52 (which previously had been a local 
sewer built by the town) and Section 53 became parts of the metro- 
politan trunk system to provide an outlet for the town of Lexington 
as provided in chapter 520 of the Acts of 1897. 

Although Lexington became a part of the Metropolitan Sewerage 
District at this time, no local sewers were built therein until 1915, 
and no connection was made to the metropolitan system until 
September, 1916. 

Section 4 of chapter 520 of the Acts of 1897 reads as follows: — 

Whenever said portion of the sewer in Massachusetts Avenue shall be in- 
sufficient to accommodate the town of Lexington and the portion of the town of 
Arlington using the same, the metropolitan sewerage commissioners shall con- 
struct a new sewer in the valley of Mill or Sucker Brook, in such a location as 
shall accommodate all portions of said valley. 



118 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

At the time of the formation of the Metropolitan Sewerage Dis- 
trict, Arlington had a population of less than 5,000, and a forecast 
gave it as having probably 10,000 in 1930. The town has grown 
much faster than was anticipated and now has a population of 
15,300 (approximately). Section 48 was designed to furnish an 
outlet for a population of 10,000 at the rate of 30 cubic feet per 
person daily. That part of Lexington included within the Sewerage 
District has a present population of 4,080, of which only 200 per- 
sons are now contributing sewage to the metropolitan sewers. Cal- 
culations made in this office based on recent census returns indicate 
that in 1940 that portion of Lexington in the Metropolitan Sewerage 
District will probably have a population of 13,000, and that Arling- 
ton will have 46,000. To provide for these populations, the metro- 
politan sewers serving these towns should then have a total ca- 
pacity of 17,700,000 gallons per day. 

The towns of Lexington and Arlington are now served by metro- 
politan sewers as follows: — 

At the Lexington-Arlington town line a 15-inch pipe sewer having 
a capacity of 2,300,000 gallons per day. 

Between Lowell Street and Brattle Street a 12-inch pipe sewer 
having a capacity of 2,000,000 gallons per day. 

Between Brattle Street and Mystic Street a 12-inch pipe sewer 
having a capacity of 2,400,000 gallons per day: 

Between Mystic Street and Alewife Brook pumping station partly 
15-inch and partly 18-inch pipe sewer having a capacity of 2,250,000 
gallons per day. 

Arlington has also two other outlets into the Alewife Brook metro- 
politan sewer, — one at Henderson Street and one at Lake Street. 

The town of Arlington maintains two automatic pumping plants,. 
— one at Brattle Street and one at Grove Street. These lift the 
sewage from limited areas north of Mill Brook into the metropoli- 
tan sewer in Massachusetts Avenue. 

At the present time no portion of the metropolitan sewer in Massa- 
chusetts Avenue is carrying more than two-thirds of its capacity. 

The town of Arlington may be divided into three districts — one 
to the east of Mystic Street which can be made tributary to a low- 
level sewer only, like the one now entering the Alewife Brook pump- 
ing station (this will have an estimated population in 1940 of about 
29,000, and now has three outlets to the metropolitan sewers); the 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 119 

second portion extends between Mystic Street and Brattle Street, 
and will have a population in 1940 of probably 10,500; the third 
part of the town is that lying to the westward of Brattle Street, 
and will have a population in 1940 of probably 7,500. The two 
latter divisions with Lexington's contributory population estimated 
at 12,750 in 1940 will give a total population in Mill Brook valley 
above Mystic Street of 30,750. This population would require a 
sewer with a capacity of 9,300,000 gallons per day to provide for 
these areas. 

In studying the problem, it has been thought proper to divide 
the sewage from Arlington and Lexington into two parts and take 
the portion from all of the territory in the upper part of the valley 
across to West Medford and there discharge it into the existing 
metropolitan sewer at High and Canal streets and continue to take 
the portion from the remaining part of the town of Arlington, namely, 
that part east of Mystic Street to the low-level Alewife Brook sewer, 
as is now being done. 

To provide for the disposal from the higher parts a trunk sewer 
has been studied starting from the corner of High and Canal streets 
in West Medford extending westerly through High Street, crossing 
the Mystic River into Arlington and then extending through Med- 
ford Street and Hayes Street in and through private lands and Mt. 
Pleasant Cemetery to a crossing of Mill Brook near Sachem Street 
and thence through Sachem Street to Mystic Street, then in Mystic 
Street and part of Summer Street and then in private lands crossing 
the Boston & Maine Railroad location to Mill Street and then 
through a proposed street and private lands and land of the Arling- 
ton Gas Company to and across Grove Street, thence through Dud- 
ley Street to a point in Brattle Street. This sewer will have a 
total length of about 11,400 feet and will consist of a 36-inch by 42- 
inch concrete sewer and 24-inch, 20-inch and 18-inch pipe sewers 
with relief connections extending from the existing metropolitan 
sewer through Mystic Street and Brattle Street to the proposed 
trunk line, about 1,550 feet in length. 

By this method all of the tributary territory of Lexington and of 
Arlington to the westward of Mystic Street in Mill Brook valley 
can be permanently and adequately served. 

The Board is not called upon to report upon any part of Arling- 
ton not lying in Mill Brook valley. 



120 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

The construction work study has been limited to that portion 
east of Brattle Street for the present because it is believed that the 
town of Arlington can conveniently bring its collecting sewers to 
this point. While it is proposed at present to consider building 
only as far as Brattle Street, the needs of the whole valley have 
been studied, and the line as shown, on the plan extending to the 
Lexington town line, together with the existing metropolitan sewer, 
will furnish adequate outlet for this area. 

The estimated cost of the construction of this portion of the line 
with the relief connections is $350,000. This estimate is based on 
unit prices named in bids recently received by the Board for sewer 
work in a territory similar to and not far distant from this work. 
Prices of material are still advancing and labor is scarce and in- 
efficient and wage rates are rising. 

There is no doubt that the construction of a sewer in Mill Brook 
valley must in a few years be undertaken. The condition, however, 
named in section 4 of chapter 520 of the Acts of 1897 has not yet 
arrived. 

A map showing the route and profile of the sewer line as studied 
is on file in this office. 

Gasolene in Public Sewers. 

The efforts to improve the condition of the Metropolitan sewers 
in regard to dangers resulting from the introduction of gasolene 
into the same have been continued throughout the year and have 
been successful. 

An inspector has been employed in this department whose duty 
it is to visit existing garages and see that the separators are kept 
in proper condition, also to enforce the regulation concerning the 
installation of such separators at all newly constructed garages. 

There has been a large growth in the number of places from which 
gasolene might be discharged into the Metropolitan Sewerage Sys- 
tems. While the presence of gasolene in the sewers is noted occa- 
sionally, the condition has been greatly improved. 

The following tables show the particulars in regard to establish- 
ments known to be using gasolene and which are connected with the 
public sewerage systems of the different municipalities in the Met- 
ropolitan districts : — 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



121 



North Metropolitan Sewerage District. 

Table showing Number of Places where Gasolene is used connected with Public 
Sewers and Progress of Work of installing Separators to December 31, 1917. 



City or Town. 


Number 
of Places 
connected 

with Sewer. 


Number 

of Places 

' originally 

having 
Acceptable 
Separators. 


Number 
of Places 

where 

Changes 

have been 

made. 


Number 

of New 

Garages 

built, 

1917. 


Number 
of Places 

where 
Changes 

have 
yet to be 

made. 


Arlington, ..... 


6 




3 


3 


- 


Belmont 


4 


- 


2 


1 


1 


Boston : — 












Charlestown District, . 


19 


- 


11 


8 


- 


East Boston District, 






17 


- 


7 


10 


- 


Cambridge, 






90 


- 


49 


40 


li 


Chelsea, . 




• 






18 


- 


9 


9 


- 


Everett, . 










14 


- 


13 


1 


- 


Lexington, 










- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Maiden, . 










20 


- 


19 


1 


- 


Medford, . 










13 


- 


10 


3 


- 


Melrose, . 










5 


- 


5 


- 


- 


Revere, 










9 


- 


6 


3 


- 


Somerville, 










40 


8 


23 


9 


- 


Stoneham, 










6 


- 


3 


3 


- 


Wakefield, 










6 


- 


4 


2 


- 


Winchester, 










14 


- 


12 


2 


- 


Winthrop, 










4 


- 


4 


- 


- 


Woburn, . 










3 


- 


2 


1 


- 


Reading, - 










- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Totals, 


288 


8 


182 


96 


2 



1 Storer's garage. 



2 Not yet connected with Metropolitan sewers. 



122 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



South Metropolitan Sewerage District. 

Table showing Number of Places where Gasolene is used connected with Public 
Sewers and Progress of Work of installing Separators to December 81, 1917. 



City or Town. 


Number 

of Places 

connected 

with Sewer. 


Number 
of Places 
originally 

having 
Acceptable 
Separators. 


Number 
of Places 

where 

Changes 

have been 

made. 


Number 

of New 

Garages 

built, 

1917. 


Number 
of Places 

where 
Changes 

have 
yet to be 

made. 


Boston: — 












Hyde Park District, 


14 


- 


8 


6 


- 


West Roxbury District, 




20 


10 


10 


13 


- 


Back Bay District, 




48 


5 


23 


20 


- 


Brighton District, 






43 


22 


21 


22 


- 


Dorchester District, 






27 


20 


7 


22 


- 


Brookline, 






60 


9 


36 


15 


- 


Dedham, . 










3 


3 


- 


1 


- 


Milton, 










1 


1 


- 


1 


- 


Newton, . 










38 


18 


13 


7 


- 


Quincy, . 










14 


- 


12 


2 


- 


Waltham, 










5 


5 


- 


2 


- 


Watertown, 










15 


3 


10 


2 


- 


Wellesley, 1 










- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Totals, 


288 


96 


140 


113 


- 



1 Not yet connected with Metropolitan sewers. 



Drainage from Tanneries, Gelatine and Glue Works in 
Winchester, Woburn and Stoneham. 

Four men and a foreman have been employed during a part of 
the year in flushing and cleaning the Metropolitan sewers through 
the tannery districts of Winchester, Woburn and Stoneham. 

All the tanneries and glue works of the district now have settling 
tanks of substantial size. This method of treatment has very 
greatly reduced the amount of sludge material entering the Metro- 
politan sewers. 

The following table gives details of settling tanks introduced to 
date, showing the operations of same with the amount of sludge 
collected and removed : — 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



123 



Table of Semi-fluid Sludge removed from Settling Basins at the Tanneries, Gela- 
tine and Glue Works in Winchester, Woburn and Stoneham, Year ending 
December 31, 1917. 











H3 


.LTl « 


T3 W) • 










<D 
c3 


■ Sem 

emove 

(Cubi 


mi-flui 

durin 

Yards 








Inside 


■r. u 
© c3 


^> t-, u 


©73 o 


Location of Basin. 


Basin put in 
Operation. 


Measure- 
ment 

of Basin 
(Feet). 




5 Quant 
Sludge 
g the Ye 
i). 


uantity 1 
e remov 
ear (Cub 












Sf-c-S'S 


C^ 










3T3 


ven 
flui 
dur 
Yai 












fc 


< 


H 


Beggs & Cobb Company, Basin No. 1, 


Jan. 15, 


1910 


47.0 X 23.0 


4 


136.00 


544.00 


Beggs & Cobb Company, Basin No. 2, 


May 9, 


1910 


47.0 X 23.0 


4 


136.00 


544.00 


Beggs & Cobb Company, Basin No. 3, 


Oct. 19, 


1911 


51.0 X 25.0 


3 


162.50 


487.50 


Beggs & Cobb Company, "Rotary Screen 


Dec. 12, 


1917 


_ 


- 


- 


22.20 


Process." 1 














S. C. Parker & Son, 


Aug. 1, 


1910 


48.3 X 23.0 


2 


34.94 


69.88 


American Hide and Leather Company, 


Nov. 15, 


1910 


48.0 X 23.1 


5 


139.50 


697.50 


Factory D. 














Dorington Leather Company, 2 . 


Dec. 10, 


1910 


47.2 X 23.0 


4 


106.84 


427.36 


E. Cummings Leather Company, 


Nov. 1, 


1910 


45.9 X 22.6 


2 


97.60 


195.20 


W. P. Fox & Sons, . 


July 12, 


1910 


47.8 X 22.6 


4V 2 


270.40 


1,216.80 




Sept. 15, 


1910 


48.1 X 23.1 


m 


209.80 


734.30 






1911 j 


46.8 X 22.9 


- 


_ 


_ 


Morris Kaplan, ...... 


Jan. 9, 














I 


4.0 X 4.0 


50 


1.00 


50.00 






f 


10.2 X 14.5 


9 


16.00 


144.00 


Van Tassell Leather Company, 


May 1, 


191H 














I 


43.8 X 19.5 


2 


102.00 


204.00 


American Glue Company, 


Oct. 1, 


1910 


47.1 X 23.0 


SM 


136.36 


340.90 






I 


35.5 X 24.7 


26 


58.74 


1,527.24 


J. 0. Whitten Company, . 


1902 














I 


67.2 X 12.0 


24 


8.50 


204.00 


Total, 


- 


- 


- 


- 


7,408.88 



1 By permission of the Board, dated July 25, 1917, effluent formerly passing through three settling basins 
has been conducted through " Riensch-Wurl " screens and is allowed to enter the Metropolitan Sewer by 
a special 15" branch. 

Permission was granted with the provision that all existing connections and settling basins shall be 
left intact and ready for use if necessary. One-half of screening plant was operated from December 12 to 
31, 1917. 

2 Successors to B. F. Kimball & Company. 



124 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 







to 
3 








• 2 


MJ 

CO 








to 


<4> 








Q 


St 








p-o 


Oh 








o 


"& 








Qh 


co 








"« 


© 
•<o 








55 


to 








■w 


<r 










03 








•<o 










■to 




co 






co 


co 

© 
St 


R 
© 

•<o 

to 






* ** 

'■©■ 
<» 
to 


-r 

© 


© 
r-o 

s 

Pt 






<4i 
R 

3 


9 


© 
ftn 

to 






© 


R 
© 


© 

to 

© 






08 

St 


CO 


&1 








R 

© 

•<s> 

■to 

© 

ItO 


to 

R 

© 

CO 
© 






•&" 


R 


St 

fts 






co 


© 

ft. 


© 

to 




H 


•e» 




fth 


1 — ' 


02 


S! 


R 


R 

•<o 


C5 


U2 


V 


CO 

<^ 
S- 

ft* 

r 

C3 


R 






to 

•«o 
O 
A. 


•<■» 

St 
to 

s 

© 
© 

a 


CO 

u 

0/ 

S 

03 
O 
09 


H 


a. 


<4i 


© 


Q 


C/J 


^ 


■ho 


g 


o 

go 

C3 

0) 


< 


w 


•<o 

to 


co 
K 

© 

'.o 
to 


►J 


to 

co 


© 


© 

to 




o 


SS5 


s 


fl 


Ph 


CO 


© 


Pt 




o 




-to 


© 


gg 


Eh 
Ph 


co 


^ 


fts 


V 


-S3 

■*— ■ 

O 

•lad 


i~o> 

© 

"to 

© 

s 


co 
© 


a 

.2 
'-5 
eg 


IT! 


OS 


•<o 


to 


a 


P5 
O 


©> 


to 

R 

co 
•as 


© 

03 


o 

Cm 




©s 

s 

•<o 

St 


tO) 


CO** 






03 


© 


© 






~ 


to 


St 






•<o 
i-«o 


© 


^ 






^3 




© 

to 






co 
R 


©i 

si 


© 






| 


*<s> 


•<o 
to 






© 


5$ 

•<o 


^> 






"S 


St 

to 


© 






R 


© 


CO 
©• 






co 

•28 

to 


3 

© 


St 

"1 






©> 


r 

co 








r 


© 


i 






•<o 


St 


rO 






© 


^ 








*r 


"W 


e 






co 


R 
© 


© 





■s 





Ratio of 
Contribut- 
ing Area 

to 

Ultimate 

Area. 




CO 






> -' GO "5 ifl iO 5D lO tfi 00 00 CO IM i— i CO CM CO 
0) 

Ph 






Ratio of 

Contributing 

Population 

to Present 

Total 
Population. 


'^OtO'J'iNtXOOO'HXrtOOXtOOiNINNeOO 


© 

00 






0_}OO5O5aiG0C7iCOO5O5C7SO5O5'*llCI^O5CO 00 
(h 






Area 
ultimately 

to 

contribute 

Sewage. 


CO 

Oi -OO'^TllNCONHeiOlOT-tOOfflW'-HDN 

~ so ^h cq co © r- (M -h o5 co en t>. in cm to co it oo oo 


CM 

CO 

© 
© 






^ i->eqNMlOCi5'H«c<)00lONlOlO'*Nl(5lOOS 






Estimated 

Area 
now con- 
tributing 
Sewage. 


03 

a; ON^(C6Ti<Nitioo<oi-ii-iot«oc<)>o 

-— t*t i-( i-H OS i— 00 © © »C i— I UO © t-- OS CO =o CM © 


© 

CM 

CO ■ 






§ HHrtHMHO>OM»HHO'H«OOIN 






Estimated 
Present 
Total 
Popula- 
tion. 


W5©UO©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©© 
m(NQ0MTjt!O'HO0505N'H>0lNO'tO(Nt(N 
t>-e00002CN|©t^©00©0'Jlf500t>'©i— HONNU) 

TtlOOffiOtNO'HFHMOfflNfflOCOttlOON 
HiO^^lOH^HOlMHH t-H i-c CM 


© 

CM 

CM 

co" 

CO 

CO 






Estimated 
Population 
now con- 
tributing 
Sewage. 


iflKJ'OiflOiOOiO'CiOO'OOiflOOiOiOiO 1 
l«r- (t^COOOCMCSICM»0^t<i-llf5CO^CO-^-HCO© 
t^iHtOrtC<)OOOtOlOIN<NOrHlflCJM^(Nl^ 

itmjiciotoioaooMONitwx* co 

rHCDlJIM^rtM'HOlM'H w* CN 


N- 

©__ 

OO" 

© 

«5 






Estimated 

Number of 

Persons 

served by 
Each House 
Connection. 


©©©©©©©©"5«?©©©©©©©© 

tt3it>-o:tt«oeo©©^teN»oooot— ©usee© 


© 
© 






Tf<e<|©©©'^t^-©»0>OiOiO'Tti»0«DiOrJt© 






Number 
of Con- 
nections 
with Local 
Sewers. 


1 CO -H OO CO © TO 00 i— l CO Tft t*< O0 l>. i-( t^ CO <M CM 1 
0©>— ii— OOCOCMlOI>-©COCOi*iCMOO©«0© 
© © CM i— i © CO ■*»< NO © © CN © CO CM O0 lO 
Co"lO ■* O © COlO © UO © i— I i-T CM i—l co" 


CM 

OO 

•Hit" 

OO 






Separate or Combined. 


T2 r ^ 'Xi T3 '^ '^ 
<t> <D <3i CJ flj 3J 

ccc c a c ii 

• -'£]E]S • '££3 

ESS S S S 
o o o o o o 

^ ""0 ^0 ^ ^ ^ 
C S3 C3 S3 S3 S3 
zi Tj ci c3 c3 c3 

ac3c3c3c3c3c3c3c3c3c3c3ac3o3c3^ c3 
C3c3c3c303c3c3c3c^c3c3c^c3c3c3c3c3i c3. 

a Ch a c c a a a a a a a a a d. a & ' a 1 
<ua>mcjcjc>iQja)a)a>svicjajc3a)c>>Ci) <u 
02 02 02 03 02 CB «2 02 OJ 02 CQ CC CO CO CO CC CO CO 


1 

1 






Miles 
of Local 
Sewers 

con- 
nected. 


OiHlOUJNCOOKOXHtONrttOrtOniHiO 
NitlCDOa/MOIMNUiiHCO^TjlOfflMlON 


CM 

© 

© 
© 
N- 






(MMONOO-HiiirtioMioco-iHTeeiH 

CO CO CO Tft © CO CM iti © © CO i-l ^^ CO CM t-H •**! 






OS 

O 

H 

Q 
< 
M 

B 





00 

"5 
■ii 

O 






Boston (Deer Island), 

Winthrop, 

Boston (East Boston), 

Chelsea, . 

Everett, . 

Maiden, . 

Melrose, . 

Boston (Charlestown), 

Cambridge, 

Somerville, 

Medford, 

Winchester, 

Woburn, 

Stoneham, 

Arlington, 

Belmont, 

Wakefield, 

Lexington, 

Revere, . 

Reading, 5 





> 
ea 



a 




TJ 







03 














a 
c 
o 
S 




O 
S3 
G 

O 

C 




O 


+-■ 




O) 


Q 


M 


>o 


s 


S3 


o 




-3 


S3 


3 


T3 




> 3 



hS Ph 



S3 
O 

H-> 

M 

O 

-th' >> 

§ ' s 

>2 J? 



S3 


3 


lO 










© 




a 


H=! 


•^ 




n 




■m 




-1 


o 


O 




la 


gq 








3 






^J 






99 

a 


s 

3 


d 

0) 

a 


gg 




G. 






«j 


s 


0/ 


J^ 


<D 


G 


H>3 




6 


G 
93 


o 






■H 




r> 


G 




CJ 




.2 

cri 


-d 


M 

M 

3 

PQ 




G 
H 


s 


3 


M 

5 


H 


h3 

HJ 


a 
o 
a 


i 

i 

73 


go 

s 








Ih 


H-> 


1 — 1 


c3 
1-9 


y 

go 


-3 

9 


2 

> 


H-i 




a 


CJ 


r, 


go 






3 
QQ 

>• 


03 

s 

p 


© 




-O 


u 


■-i 


O 

a 
> 
'S 

_3 

"3 


T3 


"B 


«j 


0) 


Oj 


B 


H-) 

1 


1 


a 

G 
O 


m 


go 


x 


w 


w 




W 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



125 



H 
00. 

02 

H 

O 

« 
Eh 

I— I 

O 

Ph 
O 
« 

3 



P 

O 



© ?> 

•«* co 

^° ^ 

© 



^3 



© 
05 



co co 

*© ^ 

i ^ 

8 £ 



^ 

ZQ 



-to >° 

i* 

'8 1 

© £ 

Ph qT 



<?i 
ZQ © 

ho 
•<o Si 

_^> r«o 
ho ^ 



00 

© 

■<s> 



3 

Ph 
© 

Oh 

l»0) 

© 

■♦o 
© 

•to 
0£> 

co 
<*} 
J- 



3 

* 



©s 
© 



<3 ©• 

•g © 



00 ©5 
bs -© 

^ -b 

e © 
00 



-to © 

S * 

CO 

1^ 

co § 

nj © 
»«o> 

-© 
© 



© 
CO 

© 

© 

~ 
Ph 

© 



Q5 

C3 






a 
o 



r ©* 



-2 

co 

© 
©s 

"♦O 

■«© 



8 

© 



tio of 
tribut- 
Area 
to 

imate 
rea. 


a 


Tt< 




O 1 • ■ 1 

v «HlfJM!ONNrtNlOCS O C- 


CT> 






!_ tr^ 00 »0 -^i >fi 1— 1 "5 CO CO CM 
03 

Ph 


CM 




be 








.Sfi-p a 








•h^OC C 


H-> . 






3"h3 03 — •.£ 


CoojomNNwooco ■* co 

03 1 • • 1 

r ~) en ■* cm 00 co cs •— 1 cs cm 
w 05ooo50)oocjcowM'>» r--t^ 


CM 




Rat 

Contri 

Popu. 

toPr 

To 

Popul 


t^ 




03 

Ph 






!ss 03 








Area 
ultimatel 

to 

contribut 

Sewage. 


co • 

0rHTtl'H00'*MCnCBt>OMNCC01 


CO 




j-j ot>ooxo*cxnoin-*cMe5icoo 


t^ 




§i-HCO«0«D-^CO-*iCM'*05i— IOOCMO 


o 










stimated 

Area 
iow con- 
ributing 
Sewage. 


03 






-"OOM't'H'^NNOcO OO 






LH —1 cm so 00 co ■* >n 05 00 t^ co 
S 1 • ■ I 

rtMMMNNNOrtO CM CO 


CO 

CM 

CO 




G* 






H "*» 


OJ 






T3 








mate 

esent 

otal 

pula- 

ion. 


omooooooiooooo© 


o 




-<WnoO'HlC(Nl(3'-irHCi5NcDM 


t^ 




OCMON»0-*rHlOWt^!DCCO 
OC-r-cO-rfiOO — MOCSHTfMMt. 


o_ 

CO 




-J3 Jh H -^ 


CO Tjt CO -^ .— CO OO iHrt-^-fli^i 


r^ 






H*< 




w 








Estimated 
Population 
now con- 
tributing 

Sewage. 


"OKJlOOOlOlOlOlfllO 1 ^o 1 


kO 




M(N(NCSOCDt>-*^.CO CMCO 






tiMffllOOlflNNCCN CO 00 


t^ 










t-~.-*-m— 'cooc~->HHi>-Tti ~- er> 


CM 




CO CO CO -^ 1— 1 CM W ^H coco 








CO 




i mated 
mber of 
ersons 
ved by 
h House 
inection. 


CONMKSCOfflNOCMlO COCO 

1 - - 1 

O00NCON0310N10 t~- tO 
CM 


CO 




X =Ph S3 § 








(-1 . CO ?? . 








umbe 
f Con- 
jction 
;h Loc 
ewers 


-hh CO t— 1 CM 00 O CD C31jCO CO I ©OO I 


075 




ioocNffloo)«5-*- ito h*<-h 


•* 




00 O » U) 00 00 o> OS <* cc 00_ 






i-H.T^TjTtC cm"co «5 cm" hhTiO 


io" 






■«* 




Z O c-^GG 








^ 








"C 


TJT3T3 'OTS "G 






03 


03 03 03 03 03 03 






c 


a a a a a 1 a i 


1 












|S 


^3X!jo • • - ^XJ • • .Q " 






a 


SSH 6 S S 









000 






u 


O03O...OC3.. C3. 






"CCS "O TJ T3 






u 




CCiS C G fi 






C3c3c3^^^ff3c3 rt^ 






03 








O30303Ororor03fl3O3"*0r 03oT 






"e3 
s- 

c3 

0) 

02 


<J V -p -p +> +J +J +1 +1 +J +J+J 






C3c3c5c3c$c€c3c3c3c3 ~ ~ 






•„l_i-L.Ui.L.i-t-^. •_ i. 






~nr;rtr;r;rtrt~~. n n 






O.O.O.P.O.O.O.Q.Q.O. 1 CO. 1 


1 




0303030303O0303O03 0303 






xfimmwxMiuiuiww ccm 






m"3 S . nfl 


CO CO CO 00 CO to OO »C — O C55 its 


t^. 




Mile 
of Loc 
Sewei 

con- 
nectei 


lOOTrt-^MMlOWW O CM 

1 ■ ■ 1 

co co h* r^ t^ t^ i-~ t~ ^« t>- OO 


CO 




CM tO t^ CM Tft -T lO <— i CO i— I CO 00 


lO 




~ 


CO 












03 


~>> 






2: 








£ 


^ . • • • ' IH "^ -".^ • • 






c 
H 

Q 
I? 


>,^v 0> tH ^- X 






sk Ba; 
ghton 

rchest 

■dePa 

xbury 
st Ro 






•< 


— -^ 2 - > c •— ^-^ e — "— ?*> 

,:cos - c - S3 






CO 


DB 




a 


3 




H 


-2-2c>^^h2o5£-SSc« 

35 ^ O !£ "£» T3 co—- tn J 3 oq orj.rt— . 


o 




6 






C0i.«Sci .„ 0{)53«) 








cqpqcQZ^^caSpQPwwc^ 







< 

o 
o 

fcH 

o 










> 










m 




3 

C 


s 


S 






n 




>> 


Ih 








DEJ 


~ 




CD 


U] 


ta 


^ 


s 


- 


bC 


HP 




d 




- 


3 
< 

Btl 

SB 


od 


cu 

+3 




P 

'3 


o 


(H 


^>j 


p, 


^1 





B 


13 

B 


c 

H>9 

s 


5 


HP 
4p 


s 


7. 


— 






o 


DO 


? 

T3 


r. 


= 


pq 


c 






.- 




o 


X 


s 


— 


HP 


— 
- 


d 




E 


is 


S) 


-y. 






r 


a 


BO 


S 







o 




u 


— 








B 


03 


*s 


E 


o 

c 


a 

- 


a 


>. 


o 




n 


c 






c 


03 





o 




* 


4i 




c 


03 

— 





C 

CD 


bl 

a 


>> 


- 
DC 


o 

3 
- 


A 

< 


_5 
a 


S 

> 



126 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 





CO Cs> 








S 8 ^ 








<w *5 








"- "3 








■**H 3 
^ iO 








*<S> 








"53 h: 








<0 to 








3 O 








•S ■« 








■i g 








« *> 








r~o co 








3 ^ 
















^ ^ 








© 








^ cs 

to O 
















S S 








•1 Q- 








co 








6q •. 


CO 






co 


3 
o 






tf g 


•<o 
•to 






■§ ^ 


3 

c»o 






o 


3 
Ps 
o 

ft* 






3 ^ 








i»ta 




02 


co 3 


,3 




s 




"© 




Eh 
CG 


5 cc 
J 3 


5-s 

so 

3 

CO 


OS 


GO 


*£» 3 


_7 




© r~S 


QJ 


CO 





mte Miles 
esent Popu 


O 

so 

©5 

3 
•<o 
to 

3 


u 

o 

a 

45 

O 
(0 

Q 




3 "- 


rO 


DO 


fc 
3 

H 




•co 
so 

3 
© 


45 


i— t 


to 

. 3 


1 


O 

Ph 

o 

Ph 

Eh 
H 


3 
© 
3 


o 


stems; 
ontrib 


co 
3 
© 

•<o 
so 

3 

fo 

3 


.2 

ji 


w 


35 « 
<*3 © 


o 


Eh 


to 


3s 




O 


to both 
matehj 


© 
Oh 






co 






co 

Qi so 


O 






©5 ^ 

© 5s 








3 






3 ec 


fts 






J» 3 








OQ S 
* J- 


1 






©5 ^ 

3 ^ 


3 






*<o l-O 


co~ 
3 






*- 3 

<u so 






.?=> O 


<» 








J- 






"^ 










<*> 






CO ©5 

© 3 


to 

3 






CV> '<o 


•<s> 






to 
»—o 






•<o. 

©5 h 

.? 1 








i a 


to 






3 o 


CO 






© 


© 






-3 3 

co 5 

^ 8 


<45 












rC 








5 








6h 







tio of 
tribut- 
Area 
to 

imate 
rea. 


©-^ 


•* 


00 


O^ 


05 


o 


c4 a M *i<! 

w o ,rt ° 


fcn CO 
© 

Ph 


ICO 


CO 


bfi 








.Sep a 








•--Doc o 


-<-> 






Ratio c 

Contribu 

Populati 

to Prese 

Total 

Populati 


C 






© t^ 


CM 


eo 

CM 


t-,00 

© 
Ph 


t^ 


OO 


Area 
ultimately 

to 

contribute 

Sewage. 


OQ 
© <M 


CO 


oo 


—-co 


t^ 


o 


go 
^ o 


o 


^ 






CM 








Estimated 

Area 
now con- 
tributing 
Sewage. 


© 




^^ 




CO 

CN1 

CO 


o 

CO 


o* 






OQ 






mated 

esent 

otal 

pula- 

ion. 


o 


o 


o 


N 

CO 
CO 


o 

CO* 


CO 

o 


«Ph Ph 


CO 


■<** 


rm L 


H 








Estimated 
Population 
now con- 
tributing 
Sewage. 


lO 


iO 


o 


lr^ 




05 


O 


t^ 


t^ 


00 


ci" 


o" 


CO 


CO 


OS 








© ° oq_q a. 2 








+? ^ fl O -u 








Estima 

Numbe 

Perso 

served 
Each Hi 
Connec 


t— 


CO 


o 


CO 


t^ 


t^ 
















M . m « . 








Numbe 
of Con- 
nection; 
with Loc 
Sewers 


<M 


05 




CO 


■<*< 


co 


00 




CO 

a> 

CM 

7— 1 


TJ 


nS 


T3 




© 


© 


© 




C 


c 


a 


1 










IS 


ja 


^2 




a 


S 


s 




o 


o 


o 




o 


© 


s 






T3 


T3 




(4 

o 


C 


c 




cS 


c4 




© 
4J 


© 


© 




c3 


+3 


•*J 




c3 


03 




s 

a 
© 

QQ 


h 


u 




C3 

a 


03 

a 


1 


© 

QQ 


© 

CO 






CM 


!>. 


C35 


m u i T3 


C5 




o 


Mile 

of 

Sewe 

con- 
necte 


CO 


CO 


CO 
<M 


t^ 


CO 


■* 












a 


a 






c3 


03 






+s 


■w 




a 


U3 








a 


1 




C0 


o 


o 




«2 


© 


ft 

© 


w 






s 


"3 




J3 




o 







3 
o 

72 





No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



127 



PUMPING STATIONS. 

Capacity and Results. 

During the year 1917 the amount pumped at the various pumping 
stations of the Metropolitan Sewerage Works has decreased from 
2.6 per cent, to 15.6 per cent, as compared with last year's pumping. 

The total cost of operation of the pumping stations has increased 
17 per cent, as compared with that of last year. This increase is 
due to an advance in the wages of all of the employees and to the 
very great increase in the cost of fuel and supplies. 

Average Daily Volume of Sewage lifted at Each of the Six Principal Metropolitan 
Pumping Stations and at the Quincy (Hough's Neck) Sewage Lifting Station 
during the Year, as compared with the Corresponding Volumes for the Previous 
Year. 





Average Daily Pumpage. 


PUMPING STATION. 


Jan. 1, 1916, to 
Dec. 31, 1916. 


Jan. 1, 1917, to 
Dec. 31, 1917. 


Decrease during the 

Year. 


Deer Island, ...... 


Gallons. 
66,300,000 


Gallons. 
64,600,000 


Gallons. 
1,700,000 


Per Cent. 
2.6 


East Boston, ... 


64,300,000 


62,600,000 


1,700,000 


2.6 


Charlestown, ...... 


37,300,000 


36,300,000 


1,000,000 


2.7 


Alewife Brook 


3,847,000 


3,393,000 


454,000 


11.8 


Quincy, . 


4,780,000 


4,033,000 


747,000 


15.6 


Ward Street (actual gallons pumped), 


29,864,000 


28,457,000 


1,407,000 


4.7 


Quincy (Hough's Neck) sewage lifting sta- 
tion. 


187,238 


184,799 


2,439 


1.3 



North Metropolitan System. 

Deer Island Pumping Station. 

At this station are four submerged centrifugal pumps with im- 
peller wheels 8.25 feet in diameter, driven by triple-expansion engines 
of the Reynolds-Corliss type. 

Contract capacity of 1 pump: 100,000,000 gallons, with 19-foot lift. 

Contract capacity of 3 pumps: 45,000,000 gallons each, with 19-foot lift. 

Average duty for the year: 55,400,000 foot-pounds. 

Average quantity raised each day: 64,600,000 gallons. 

Force employed: 4 engineers, 1 relief engineer, 4 firemen, 4 oilers, 3 screenmen, 

1 relief screenman and 1 laborer. 
Coal used: Bituminous, costing from $5.85 to $9.60 per gross ton. 



128 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Table of Approximate Quantities, Lifts and Duties at the Deer Island Pumping 
Station of the North Metropolitan System. 



Months. 


Total 
Pumpage 
(Gallons). 


Average 
per Day 
(Gallons). 


Minimum 

Day 
(Gallons). 


Maximum 
Day 

(Gallons). 


Average 

Lift 
(Feet). 


Average 

Duty (ft.-lbs. 

per 100 lbs. 

Coal). 


1917 

January, . 




2,005,900,000 


64,700,000 


50,400,000 


100,800,000 


11.18 


59,000,000 


February, 






1,810,800,000 


64,700,000 


50,400,000 


105,000,000 


11.20 


49,900,000 


March, 






2,149,400,000 


69,300,000 


48,600,000 


104,000,000 


11.48 


49,200,000 


April, 






2,081,500,000 


69,400,000 


54,700,000 


104,200,000 


11.19 


53,900,000 


May, 






2,243,600,000 


72,400,000 


54,700,000 


117,700,000 


11.84 


58,300,000 


June, 






2,208,200,000 


73,600,000 


58,800,000 


108,300,000 


11.19 


59,600,000 


July, 






2,046,800,000 


66,000,000 


50,900,000 


81,900,000 


10.69 


65,400,000 


August, . 






1,931,500,000 


62,300,000 


43,800,000 


110,300,000 


11.22 


55,800,000 


September, 






1,539,100,000 


51,300,000 


42,200,000 


93,900,000 


10.46 


46,000,000 


October, . 






1,737,500,000 


58,000,000 


35,800,000 


97,500,000 


11.41 


46,500,000 


November, 






1,751,100,000 


58,400,000 


46,300,000 


73,700,000 


11.11 


61,500,000 


December, 






2,029,900,000 


65,500,000 


49,900,000 


111,000,000 


10.81 


59,900,000 


Total, 


23,535,300,000 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Average, . 






- 


64,600,000 


48,900,000 


100,700,000 


11.15 


55,400,000 



Average Cost per Million Foot-gallons for Pumping at the Deer Island Station, 

Volume (23,535.3 Million Gallons) X Lift (11.15 Feet) = 262,418.6 Million Foot-gallons. 



Items. 


Cost. 


Cost per 
Million Foot- 
gallons. 


Labor, 


$18,550 61 


$0.07069 


Coal, .......... 






16,788 97 


0.06398 


Oil, 

Waste, 

Water, 






275 75 

155 48 

1,448 40 


0.00105 
0.00059 
0.00552 


Packing, 






127 31 


0.00046 


Miscellaneous supplies, repairs and renewals, 






1,345 39 


0.00513 


Totals, 


$38,691 91 


$0.14744 


Labor at screens, ......... 






$3,543 86 


- 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



129 



East Boston Pumping Station. 

At this station are four submerged centrifugal pumps, with im- 
peller wheels 8.25 feet in diameter, driven by triple-expansion engines 
of the Reynolds-Corliss type. 

Contract capacity of 1 pump: 100,000,000 gallons with 19-foot lift. 

Contract capacity of 3 pumps: 45,000,000 gallons each, with 19-foot lift. 

Average duty for the year: 73,700,000 foot-pounds. 

Average quantity raised each day: 62,600,000 gallons. 

Force employed; 4 engineers, 2 relief engineers, 3 firemen, 1 relief fireman, 4 
oilers, 3 screenmen, 1 relief screenman, 3 helpers and 1 laborer. 

Coal used: Bituminous, costing from $5.55 to $10.38 per gross ton, and anthra- 
cite screenings, costing $6.72 per gross ton. 



Table of Approximate Quantities, Lifts and Duties at the East Boston Pumping 
Station of the North Metropolitan System. 



Months. 


Total 
Pumpage 

(Gallons). 


Average 
per Day 
(Gallons). 


Minimum 

Day 
(Gallons). 


Maximum 

Day 
(Gallons). 


Average 

Lift 
(Feet). 


Average 

Duty (ft.-lbs. 

per 100 lbs. 

Coal). 


1917 

January, . 




1,943,900,000 


62,700,000 


48,400,000 


98,800,000 


14.97 


76,800,000 


February, 




' 


1,754,800,000 


62,700,000 


48,400,000 


103,000,000 


15.14 


79,600,000 


March, 






2,087,400,000 


67,300,000 


46,600,000 


102,000,000 


14.87 


76,400,000 


April, 






2,021,500,000 


67,400,000 


52,700,000 


102,200,000 


14.82 


82,400,000 


May, 






2,181,600,000 


70,400,000 


52,700,000 


115,700,000 


15.01 


75,500,000 


June, 






2,148,200,000 


71,600,000 


56,800,000 


106,300,000 


15.09 


74,500,000 


July, 






1,984,800,000 


64,000,000 


48,900,000 


79,900,000 


15.46 


89,300,000 


August, . 






1,869,500,000 


60,300,000 


41,800,000 


108,300,000 


14.87 


67,000,000 


September, 






1,479,100,000 


49,300,000 


40,200,000 


91,900,000 


14.56 


60,300,000 


October, . 






1,737,500,000 


56,000,000 


33,800,000 


95,500,000 


15.14 


63,800,000 


November, 






1,691,100,000 


56,400,000 


44,300,000 


71,700,000 


15.47 


69,800,000 


December, 






1,967,900,000 


63,500,000 


47,900,000 


109,000,000 


15.48 


68,900,000 


Total, 


22,867,300,000 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Average, 






- 


62,600,000 


46,900,000 


98,700,000 


15.07 


73,700,000 



130 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Average Cost per Million Foot-gallons for Pumping at the East Boston Station. 

Volume (22,867.3 Million Gallons) X Lift (15.07 feet) = 344,610.2 Million Foot-gallons. 



Items. 


Cost. 


Cost per 
Million Foot- 
gallons. 


Labor, 




$21,131 14 


$0.06132 


Coal, ... 














17,113 92 


004966 


Oil 















631 68 


0.00183 


Waste, 


. 












86 67 


000025 


Water, 















1,633 20 


0.00474 


Packing, . 














102 99 


000030 


Miscellaneous supplies, 


repairs and renewals, 












2,205 33 


0.00640 


Totals, 


$42,904 93 


$0.12450 


Labor at screens, 














$1,642 50 


- 



Charlestown Pumping Station. 

At this station are three submerged centrifugal pumps, two of 
them having impeller wheels 7.5 feet in diameter, the other 8.25 
feet in diameter. They are driven by triple-expansion engines of 
the Reynolds-Corliss type. 

Contract capacity of 1 pump: 60,000,000 gallons with 8-foot lift. 

Contract capacity of 2 pumps: 22,000,000 gallons each, with 11-foot lift. 

Average duty for the year: 53,100,000 foot-pounds. 

Average quantity raised each day: 36,300,000 gallons. 

Force employed: 4 engineers, 1 relief engineer, 4 firemen, 3 oilers, 3 screenmen 

and 1 relief screenman. 
Coal used: Bituminous, costing from $5.75 to $9.30 per gross ton. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



131 



Table of Approximate Quantities, Lifts and Duties at the Charlestown Pumping 
Station of the North Metropolitan System. 



Months. 


Total 
Pumpage 
(Gallons). 


Average 
per Day 
(Gallons). 


Minimum 
Day 

(Gallons). 


Maximum 

Day 
(Gallons). 


Average 
Lift 

(Feet). 


Average 

Duty (ft.-lbs. 

per 100 lbs. 

Coal). 


1917 

January, . 




1,141,600,000 


36,800,000 


28,700,000 


52,700,000 


8.20 


51,100,000 


February, 






1,041,000,000 


37,200,000 


25,800,000 


53,300,000 


8.24 


50,000,000 


March, 






1,201,900,000 


38,800,000 


26,600,000 


55,900,000 


8.64 


57,300,000 


April, 






1,038,300,000 


34,600,000 


27,300,000 


56,300,000 


8.39 


49,000,000 


May, 






1,212,300,000 


39,100,000 


30,100,000 


61,400,000 


8.48 


53,200,000 


June, 






1,165,900,000 


38,900,000 


30,500,000 


55,600,000 


8.32 


51,400,000 


July, 






995,800,000 


32,100,000 


24,000,000 


41,200,000 


8.41 


55,900,000 


August, . 






1,146,100,000 


37,000,000 


23,100,000 


55,800,000 


8.11 


49,300,000 


September, 






1,057,100,000 


35,200,000 


22,700,000 


63,900,000 


8.65 


57,100,000 


October, . 






1,061,700,000 


34,200,000 


21,800,000 


52,100,000 


8.29 


52,300,000 


November, 






986,900,000 


32,900,000 


24,000,000 


39,100,000 


8.25 


51,200,000 


December, 






1,193,200,000 


38,500,000 


29,100,000 


64,600,000 


7.91 


59,700,000 


Total, 


13,241,800,000 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Average, 






- 


36,300,000 


26,100,000 


54,300,000 


8.32 


53,100,000 



Average Cost per Million Foot-gallons for Pumping at the Charlestown Station. 

Volume (13,241.8 Million Gallons) X Lift (8.32 Feet) = 110,171.8 Million Foot-gallons. 



Items. 




Cost per 
Million Foot- 
gallons. 



Labor, . . 

Coal, . . 

Oil, 

Waste, 

Water, 

Packing, 

Miscellaneous supplies, repairs and renewals, 

Totals, 

Labor at screens, 



$15,033 11 
7,190 15 
150 55 
104 71 
707 10 
110 99 
153 93 



$23,450 54 
$3,456 26 



$0.13645 
0.06526 
0.00136 
0.00095 
0.00642 
0.00101 
0.00140 



$0.21285 



132 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Aleivife Brook Pumping Station. 

The plant at this station consists of two 9-inch Andrews com- 
mercial centrifugal pumps, direct connected by horizontal shafts to 
compound marine engines, together with a pump and engine added 
later. The latter consists of a specially designed engine of the ver- 
tical cross-compound type, having between the cylinders a centrif- 
ugal pump rotating on a horizontal axis. 

Contract capacity of the 2 original pumps: 4,500,000 gallons each, with 13-foot 
lift. 

Contract capacity of new pump: 13,000,000 gallons, with 13-foot lift. 

Average duty for the year: 15,400,000 foot-pounds. 

Average quantity raised each day: 3,393,000 gallons. 

Force employed: 3 engineers, 1 relief engineer, 3 screenmen and 1 relief screen- 
man. 

Coal used: Bituminous, costing from $9.75 to $10.76 per gross ton, and anthra- 
cite screenings, costing $5.70 per gross ton. 



Table of Approximate Quantities, Lifts and Duties at the Alewife Brook Pumping 
Station of the North Metropolitan System. 



Months. 


Total 
Pumpage 
(Gallons). 


Average 
per Day 
(Gallons). 


Minimum 

Day 
(Gallons). 


Maximum 

Day 
(Gallons). 


Average 

Lift 
(Feet). 


Average 

Duty (ft.-lbs. 

per 100 lbs. 

Coal). 


1917 

January, .< 




94,700,000 


3,055,000 


2,246,000 


4,922,000 


13.10 


15,500,000 


February, 






87,407,000 


3,122,000 


2,414,000 


6,636,000 


13.06 


15,900,000 


March, 






141,737,000 


4,572,000 


3,229,000 


6,400,000 


12.98 


19,100,000 


April, 






137,342,000 


4,578,000 


3,814,000 


6,636,000 


12.94 


18,700,000 


May, 






146,399,000 


4,723,000 


3,526,000 


7,108,000 


12.99 


18,300,000 


June, 






127,279,000 


4,243,000 


3,574,000 


6,141,000 


13.00 


16,900,000 


July, 






92,226,000 


2,975,000 


2,372,000 


4,677,000 


12.93 


15,500,000 


August, . 






83,911,000 


2,707,000 


2,246,000 


4,860,000 


13.00 


14,700,000 


September, 






72,916,000 


2,430,000 


2,078,000 


4,922,000 


13.03 


14,000,QOO 


October, . 






82,394,000 


2,658,000 


1,910,000 


4,376,000 


13.01 


12,600,000 


November, 






81,744,000 


2,725,000 


2,330,000 


4,085,000 


13.06 


11,800,000 


December, 






90,811,000 


2,929,000 


2,414,000 


5,494,000 


13.08 


11,300,000 


Total, 


1,238,866,000 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Average, 






- 


3,393,000 


2,679,000 


5,521,000 


13.01 


15,400,000 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



133 



Average Cost per Million Foot-gallons for Pumping at the Alewife Brook Station. 

Volume (1,238.866 Million Gallons) X Lift (13.01 Feet) = 16,117.64 Million Foot-gallons. 



Items. 




Cost per 
Million Foot- 
gallons. 



Labor, 

Coal, ... 

Oil, 

Waste, . . . 

Water, 

Packing, 

Miscellaneous supplies, repairs and renewals, 

Totals, 

Labor at screens, oiling and miscellaneous services, 



56,657 56 

4,096 39 

115 41 

77 15 

231 00 

32 22 

230 84 



$11,440 57 
$2,560 00 



$0.41306 
0.25416 
000716 
0.00479 
0.01433 
0.00200 
0.01432 



1.70982 



South Metropolitan System. 

Ward Street Pumping Station. 
At this station are two vertical, triple-expansion pumping engines, 
of the Allis-Chalmers type, operating reciprocating pumps, the 
plungers of which are 48 inches in diameter with a 60-inch stroke. 

Contract capacity of 2 pumps: 50,000,000 gallons each, with 45-foot lift. 

Average duty for the year: 85,846,000 foot-pounds. 

Average quantity raised each day: 28,457,000 gallons. 

Force employed: 4 engineers, 1 relief engineer, 4 firemen, 5 oilers, 4 assistant 

engineers, 1 machinist and 1 laborer. 
Coal used: Bituminous, costing from $5.52 to $10.36 per gross ton. 
Material intercepted at screens during the year, 1,521.3 cubic yards. 



134 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Table of Approximate Quantities, Lifts and Duties at the Ward Street Pumping 
Station of the South Metropolitan System. 



Months. 


Total 
Pumpage 
(Gallons). 


Average 
per Day 

(Gallons). 


Minimum 
Day 

(Gallons). 


Maximum 
Day 

(Gallons). 


Average 
Lift 

(Feet). 


Average 

Duty (ft.-lbs. 

per 100 lbs. 

Coal). 


1917 

January, . 




853,331,000 


27,527,000 


21,260,000 


37,312,000 


42.07 


84,223,000 


February, 






785,972,000 


28,070,000 


23,779,000 


46,916,000 


42.32 


90,379,000 


March, 






1,021,329,000 


32,949,000 


25,832,000 


46,053,000 


42.64 


88,528,000 


April, 






994,881,000 


33,163,000 


30,107,000 


42,901,000 


42.15 


86,506,000 


May, 






1,096,103,000 


35,358,000 


29,345,000 


47,056,000 


41.95 


97,613,000 


June, 






930,312,000 


31,010,000 


27,126,000 


40,259,000 


42.45 


88,282,000 


July, 






758,311,000 


24,462,000 


20,571,000 


28,511,000 


41.52 


77,848,000 


August, .■ 






787,828,000 


25,424,000 


19,285,000 


34,169,000 


41.51 


84,494,000 


September, 






687,343,000 


22,911,000 


19,649,000 


33,946,000 


41.48 


79,822,000 


October, . 






836,506,000 


26,984,000 


20,155,000 


39,386,000 


41.48 


83,356,000 


November, 






803,729,000 


26,791,000 


22,855,000 


32,185,000 


41.87 


79,935,000 


December, 






831,686,000 


26,829,000 


23,675,000 


41,133,000 


41.38 


89,170,000 


Total, 


10,387,331,000 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Average, 






- 


28,457,000 


23,637,000 


39,152,000 


41.90 


85,846,000 



Records from plunger displacements. 



Average Cost per Million Foot-gallons for Pumping at the Ward Street Station. 

Volume (10,387.3 Million Gallons) X Lift (41.90 Feet) = 435,229.2 Million Foot-gallons. 



Items. 


Cost. 


Cost per 
Million Foot- 
gallons. 


Labor, 










$18,652 90 


$0.04286 


Coal 












16,719 13 


0.03841 


Oil, 












300 17 


0.00069 


Waste, ' 












107 43 


0.00025 


Water, 












1,520 40 


000349 


Packing, 












524 30 


0.00120 


Miscellaneous supplies, repairs and renewals, 












2,957 93 


0.00680 


Totals 


$40,782 26 


$0.09370 


Labor at screens, 












$4,563 33 


- 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



135 



Quincy Pumping Station. 

At this station are two compound condensing Deane pumping 
engines and one Lawrence centrifugal pump driven by a Sturtevant 
compound condensing engine. 

Contract capacity of 3 pumps: Deane, 3,000,000 gallons; Deane, 5,000,000 gal- 
lons; Lawrence centrifugal, 10,000,000 gallons. 

Average duty for the year: 31,000,000 foot-pounds. 

Average quantity raised each day: 4,033,000 gallons. 

Force employed: 3 engineers, 1 relief engineer, 3 screenmen and 1 relief screen- 
man. 

Coal used: Bituminous, costing $10.60 per gross ton and anthracite screenings 
costing $6.72 per gross ton. 

Materials intercepted at screen during the year, 277 cubic yards. 



Table of Approximate Quantities, Lifts and Duties at the Quincy Pumping Station 

of the South Metropolitan System. 



Months. 


Total 
Pumpage 
(Gallons). 


Average 
per Day 
(Gallons). 


Minimum 

Day 
(Gallons). 


Maximum 
Day 

(Gallons). 


Average 
Lift 

(Feet). 


Average 

Duty (ft.-lbs. 

per 100 lbs. 

Coal). 


1917 

January, . 




109,994,000 


3,548,000 


2,809,000 


4,644,000 


21.04 


25,900,000 


February, 




95,195,000 


3,400,000 


3,054,000 


4,627,000 


21.04 


25,400,000 


March, 




148,312,000 


4,784,000 


3,434,000 


6,068,000 


23.17 


30,500,000 


April, 




159,178,000 


5,306,000 


4,423,000 


7,650,000 


25.26 


33,100,000 


May, 




164,153,000 


5,295,000 


4,084,000 


7,155,000 


24.61 


33,800,000 


June, 




183,426,000 


6,114,000 


4,159,000 


9,846,000 


24.04 


34,100,000 


July, 




125,919,000 


4,062,000 


3,455,000 


4,917,000 


25.84 


36,300,000 


August, . 




120,691,000 


3,893,000 


3,053,000 


4,928,000 


23.46 


33,600,000 


September, 




112,817,000 


3,761,000 


3,267,000 


4,620,000 


21.86 


30,900,000 


October, . 




118,612,000 


3,826,000 


3,100,000 


6,481,000 


21.49 


29,100,000 


November, 




132,321,000 


4,410,000 


3,613,000 


6,078,000 


23.81 


34,100,000 


December, 




121,475,000 


3,919,000 


3,527,000 


4,416,000 


22.31 


26,200,000 


Total, 


1,592,093,000 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Average, 




- 


4,033,000 


3,498,000 


5,953,000 


23.16 


31,000,000 



13G 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Average Cost per Million Foot-gallons for pumping at the Quincy Station. 

Volume (1,592.1 Million Gallons) X Lift (23.16 Feet) = 36,873.03 Million Foot-gallors. 



Items. 


Cost. 


Cost per 
Million Foot- 
gallons 


Labor, ........ 












86,380 92 


$0.17305 


Coal, 












3,786 98 


0.10270 


Oil 












43 56 


0.00118 


Waste, 












48 99 


0.00133 


Water, 












260 41 


0.00706 


Packing, 












61 77 


000168 


Miscellaneous supplies, repairs and renewals, 












265 43 


0.00720 


Totals, 


$10,848 06 


$0.29420 


Labor at screens, oiling and miscellaneous services. 










$2,452 21 


- 



Nut Island Screen-house. 

The plant at this house includes two sets of screens in duplicate 
actuated by small reversing engines of the Fitchburg type. Two 
vertical Dean boilers, 80 horse-power each, operate the engines, 
provide heat and light for the house, burn materials intercepted at 
the screens, and furnish power for the Quincy (Hough's Neck) 
sewage lifting station. 

Average daily quantity of sewage passing screens, 60,200,000 gallons. 
Total materials intercepted at screens, 1,151.6 cubic yards. 
Materials intercepted per million gallons of sewage discharged, 1.42 cubic feet. 
Force employed: 3 engineers, 1 relief engineer, 3 screenmen and 1 relief screen- 
man. 
Coal used: Bituminous, costing from $6.60 to $9.31 per gross ton. 

Quincy (Hough's Neck) Sewage Lifting Station. 

At this station are two 6-inch submerged Lawrence centrifugal 
pumps with vertical shafts actuated by two Sturtevant direct- 
current motors. 

The labor and electric energy for this station are supplied from 
the Nut Island screen-house and as used at present it does not 
materially increase the amount of coal used at the latter station. 
The effluent is largely ground water. 

Contract capacity of 2 pumps: about 1,500,000 gallons each, with 20-foot lift. 
Average daily amount pumped: 184,799 gallons. 
Average lift: 15.36 feet. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



137 



Coal delivered in the Bins of the Sewerage Works Pumping Stations during the Year. 









Gross Tons 


, Bituminous C 


OAL. 








M 
3 

'ft 

a 

3 
P4 

s . 
& a 

In O 
u e? 

Q 


faO 

3 

'S. 

a 

3 
Pi 

a 
o 

oi a 
o o 
PV43 
-p $ 

H 


a 
'a 

a 

S3 

PH 

a 

Id 

03 2 

o 


i 

ft 

a 

3 
Pi 

m ■ 

o 3 

PQ-§ 
<££ 
'5 9 

< 


bC 

3 

'ft 

a 

3 
Pi 

4> 
03 . 

*-• 3 
OD.2 


i 

S3 

m 

M 

a 
'ft 

a 

3 
Pi 
>> • 

.2 2 
'3 '-3 


s 

<o 

0) 
t-l 


m 
a 

3 

4J O 

3,3 


3 
O 

H 

03 

m 
O 
u 



t-l 
0) 

ft 

0> 
JO 

'u 

Pi 


New England Coal & Coke Com- 


' 352 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


S5 85 


pany. 
New England Coal & Coke Com- 


310 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


5 88 


pany. 
New England Coal & Coke Com- 


332 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


5 90 


pany. 
New England Coal & Coke Com- 


348 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


5 94 


pany 
Maritime Coaling Company, 


1,000 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


9 60 


New England Coal & Coke Com- 


- 


375 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


5 55 


pany. 
New England Coal & Coke Com- 


- 


1,275 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


5 65 


pany. 
New England Coal & Coke Com- 


- 


343 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


5 68 


pany. 
Metropolitan Coal Company, 


- 


155 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


6 72 


Maritime Coaling Company, . 


- 


500 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


10 38 


New England Coal & Coke Com- 


- 


- 


304 


- 


- 


- 


- 


5 77 


pany. 
New England Coal & Coke Com- 


- 


- 


302 


- 


- 


- 


- 


5 78 


pany. 
New England Coal & Coke Com- 


- 


- 


299 


-" 


- 


- 


- 


5 80 


pany. 
Coastwise Coal Company, 


- 


- 


298 


- 


- 


- 


- 


9 30 


Riverside Coal Company, 




- 


- 


- 


41 


- 


- 


- 


5 70 


Coleman Bros., 




- 


- 


- 


47 


- 


- 


- 


9 75 


Locke Coal Company, . 




- 


- 


- 


50 


- 


- 


- 


9 77 


J. A. Whittemore's Sons, 




- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


- 


- 


10 10 


Riverside Coal Company, 




- 


- 


- 


116 


- 


- 


- 


10 20 


Locke Coal Company, . 




- 


- 


- 


29 


- 


- 


- 


10 50 


Locke Coal Company, . 




- 


- 


- 


92 


- 


- 


- 


10 75 


Locke Coal Company, . 




- 


- 


- 


25 


- 


- 


- 


10 76 


Staples Coal Company, 




- 


- 


- 


- 


66 


- 


- 


5 52 


Staples Coal Company, 




- 


- 


- 


- 


79 


- 


- 


5 57 


Staples Coal Company, 




- 


- 


- 


- 


108 


- 


- 


5 58 


Staples Coal Company, 




- 


- 


- 


- 


187 


- 


- 


5 59 


Staples Coal Company, 




- 


- 


- 


- 


122 


- 


- 


5 62 


Staples Coal Company, 




- 


- 


- 


- 


399 


- 


- 


5 63 


Staples Coal Company, 




- 


- 


- 


- 


210 


- 


- 


5 64 


Staples Coal Company, 




- 


- 


- 


- 


80 


- 


- 


5 65 


Staples Coal Company, 




- 


- 


- 


- 


85 


- 


- 


5 67 



1 Includes adjustments for quality. 



138 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Coal delivered in the Bins of the Sewerage Works Pumping Stations during the Year 

— Concluded. 







Gross Tons 


, Bituminous C 


OAL. 








to 
s 
'& 


3 
Ph 

-d 

c • 

c« 3 
to O 

W-+3 

u e? 
SCO 
Q 


M 
C 

'a 

a 

3 

a 

o 

co a 
o o 

«•£ 


bd 

c 
'a 
S 

Ph 

s 
is . 

M O 

£'■$ 

J|a2 

u 


i 

a 

S 

3 
Ph 

o s 
2.2 
«"§ 


W 

3 

'ft 

£ 

Ph 
t» 

as! 


i 

e3 

bO 
a 

'ft 

a 

3 
Ph 

>> . 

s ° 


i 

3 
Oi 


hi 
o 
0Q 

T) 

3 

J3 
"w „; 

i— ( to 

GO 

3 
-P O 
3,3 


a 

o 
H 

GO 

01 

O 
u 

o 

<-. 
V 

ft 

0) 

o 

"C 

Ph. 


Staples Coal Company, 


- 


- 


- 


- 


97 


- 


- 


$5 68 


Staples Coal Company, 


- 


- 


- 


- 


87 


- 


- 


5 69 


Staples Coal Company, 


- 


- 


- 


- 


566 


- 


- 


10 35 


Metropolitan Coal Company, 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


50 


- 


6 72 


Riverside Coal Company, 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


205 


- 


10 60 


Gorman-Leonard Coal Company, 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


248 


6 60 


New England Coal & Coke Com- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


351 


9 31 


pany. 


















Total, bituminous, . 


2,312 


2,463 


1,203 


331 


2,086 


205 


599 


- 


Total screenings, 


- 


155 


- 


41 


- 


50 


- 


- 


Average cost, bituminous, 


$7 47 


$6 58 


$6 65 


$10 29 


$6 90 


$10 60 


$8 19 


- 


Average cost,, screenings, 


- 


6 72 


- 


5 70 


- 


6 72 


- 


- 



1 Includes adjustments for quality. 



Metropolitan Sewerage Outfalls. 

The original Deer Island outfall was placed at the approximate 
elevation of mean low water of Boston Harbor. It consisted of a 
circular opening 6 feet 3% inches in diameter and was put in opera- 
tion in May, 1895. 

By Chapter 344 of the Acts of the Year 1914 the Legislature 
authorized the extension of this outfall to a point where the water 
is approximately 55 feet deep at mean low water. Considerable 
delay was experienced in getting the necessary license from the 
United States Government and work was not started on this ex- 
tension until July, 1916. 

The extension consists of 9-foot lengths of cast-iron pipes varying 
in diameter from 84 inches to 48 inches at the southerly end. This 
outer pipe is open at the end and the preceding 13 pipes have 
openings on the top. Through these 13 openings and through the 
48-inch terminal pipe the sewage is discharged. The total length 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 139 

of the extension is 322 feet. The new outfall was put in operation 
December 3, 1917. 

Examinations have been made to determine the amount of dilu- 
tion by this method as compared with that obtained by the former 
method of discharge. Samples of diluted sewage taken at the out- 
fall since December 3, 1917, have been examined by the State De- 
partment of Health and have been compared by them with samples 
taken in repeated examinations of dilution by the former method. 

Mr. H. W. Clark, Director and Chief Chemist in the State De- 
partment of Health, says: — 

For a comparison you can turn to the report of the Metropolitan Sewerage 
Commissioners upon "A High-level Gravity Sewer for the Relief of the Charles 
and Neponset River Valleys." 1 You will find on page 111 of that report the 
results of the analysis of samples collected by us during the investigation of 
1898. The surface samples collected at the Deer Island Outfall at that time 
contained from twenty to ninety times as much free ammonia and from five to 
thirty-five times as much albuminoid ammonia as shown by the samples brought 
in by you. Of course, many comparisons could be made of samples taken 
during more recent years, but these, I think, are sufficient. 

Observations have been carried on for only one month but the 
indications are that the change in method has been successful to 
a high degree in the matter of dilution and in the improvement of 
the appearance of the harbor water at the point of discharge. 

During construction work on this extension it was necessary to 
divert the sewage through a temporary outfall. This consists of a 
63^ foot concrete sewer leading into one line of 60-inch cast-iron 
pipe which extends beneath the harbor bed southeasterly from the 
extreme southerly end of Deer Island to a point where the water is 
about 3 feet deep at mean low water. It is proposed to leave this 
temporary outfall in place and at some future time extend it to a. 
point where the water is 40 feet deep at low tide. 

The two outfalls thus provided would afford means for such 
ample dilution that probably no evidences of sewage could easily be 
found. 

The 60-inch outfalls of the South Metropolitan System, two of 
which were completed in 1904 and the third one in 1915, are in 
good condition and free from deposit. 

During the year the average flow through the North Metro- 

i 1899. 



140 METROPOLITAN WATER, ETC., BOARD. [P. D. No. 57. 

politan outfall at Deer Island has been 64,600,000 gallons of sewage 
per 24 hours, with a maximum rate of 161,100,000 gallons during the 
stormy periods in October and December. The amount of sewage 
discharged in the North Metropolitan District averaged 114 gallons 
per day for each person, taking the estimated population of the dis- 
trict contributing sewage. If the sewers in this district were restricted 
to the admission of sewage proper only, this per capita amount would 
be considerably decreased. 

In the South Metropolitan District an average of 60,200,000 
gallons of sewage has passed daily through the screens at the Nut 
Island screen-house, and has been discharged from the outfalls into 
the outer harbor. The maximum rate of discharge per day, which 
occurred during a heavy storm on October 24, was 162,000,000 
gallons. The discharge of sewage through these outfalls represents 
the amount of sewage contributed in the South Metropolitan System, 
which was at the rate of 176 gallons per day per person of the 
estimated number contributing sewage in the District. 

The daily discharge of sewage per capita is considerably larger in 
the South Metropolitan District than it is in the North Metropolitan 
District, because, owing to the large size and unused capacity of the 
High-level sewer, more storm water is at present admitted to the 
sewers. 

Material Intercepted at the Screens. 

The material intercepted at the screens at the North Metro- 
politan Sewerage stations, consisting of rags, paper and other float- 
ing materials, has during the year amounted to 2,211 cubic yards. 
This is equivalent to 2.537 cubic feet for each million gallons of 
sewage pumped at Deer Island. 

The material intercepted at the screens at the South Metro- 
politan Sewerage stations has amounted to 2,949.9 cubic yards, equal 
to 3.62 cubic feet per million gallons of sewage delivered at the 
outfall works at Nut Island. 

Studies of sewage flows in the Metropolitan sewers and siphons 
indicate that they are free from deposit. 



FREDERICK D. SMITH, 

Chief Engineer of Sewerage Works. 



Boston, January 2, 1918. 



APPENDIX 



142 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Appendix No. 1 . 



Contracts made and pending during 

[Note. — The details of contracts made before 





1. 

Number 

of 
Contract. 


2. 
WORK. 


3. 

Num- 
ber of 
Bids. 


Amount 


of Bid. 


6. 




4. 

Next to 
Lowest. 


5. 

Lowest. 


Contractor. 


1 


374i 


75 tons special castings, 


4 


$5,250 00 


$5,100 00- 


Standard Cast Iron 
Pipe & Foundry Co., 
Bristol, Pa. 


2 


375i 


Venturi meter tubes, registers 
and parts. 


-3 


_3 


-3 


Builders Iron Foundry, 
Providence, R. I. 


3 


377i 


Water valves: 5 36-inch, 2 30- 
inch, 4 16-inch and 5 12-inch 
screw lift valves. 


3 


8,100 00 


6,965 00 2 


Coffin Valve Co., Bos- 
ton. 


4 


378i 


Check valves: 3 30-inch, 1 20- 
inch and 1 10-inch check 
valves. 


4 


1,535 00 


1,527 002 


Ludlow Valve Mfg. 
Co., Troy, N. Y. 


5 


378-A 1 


Check valves: 2 48-inch and 
1 33-inch check valves. 


3 


3,072 00 


2,350 00 2 


Coffin Valve Co., Bos- 
ton. 


6 


379i 


Street chambers for Venturi 
meter chambers; 6 cham- 
bers. 


2 


2,022 00 


1,650 002 


Daniel Russell Boiler 
Works, Boston. 


7 


332 


Centrifugal pumping unit for 
Northern Extra High Serv- 
ice pumping station, Arling- 
ton. 


3 


10,655 00 


9,000 00 2 


F. A. Mazzur & Co., 
Boston. 


8 


3S3 


Horizontal fire-tube boiler for 
Northern Extra High Serv- 
ice pumping station, Arling- 
ton. 


3 


2,339 00 


2,296 002 


New England Iron 
Works Co., Boston. 


9 


334 


500 tons 33-inch cast-iron 
water pipe; 21 tons special 
castings. 


3* 


32,330 00 


31,860 00 


l_ 


10 


335 


Electric power transmission 
line between Wachusett 
power station in Clinton 
and Sudbury power station 
in Southborough. 


3 


79,000 00 


74,477 00 2 


Fred T. Ley & Co., 

Springfield, Mass. 


11 


39-M 


Sale and purchase of electric 
energy to be developed at 
Sudbury Dam. 


2 


-5 


_5 


Edison Electric Illu- 
minating Co. of Bos- 
ton. 



1 Contract completed. 

2 Contract based upon this bid. 

3 Competitive bids were not received. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



143 



Appendix No. 1 . 



the Year 1917 — Water Works. 

1917 have been given in previous reports.] 



7. 


8. 


9. 


10. 




Date of Con- 
tract. 


Date of 
Completion 
of Contract. 


Prices of Principal Items of Contracts. 


Value of 

Work done 

Dec. 31, 

1917. 




June 19, 1916 


Oct. 5, 1917 


See previous report, ....... 


$5,304 88 


1 


June 16, 1916 


Apr. 5, 1917 


See previous report, . , 


3,395 00 


2 


July 31, 1916 


May 14, 1917 


See previous report, . . . 


6,965 00 


3 


Aug. 2, 1916 


Mar. 13, 1917 


See previous report, ....... 


1,527 00 


4 


July 31, 1916 


Apr. 14, 1917 


See previous report, 


2,350 00 


5 


Oct. 31, 1916 


Mar. 16, 1917 


See previous report, ....... 


1,650 00 


6 


Mar. 31, 1917 


r 


For whole work, $9,000, . . 


5,500 00 


7 


May 15, 1917 


- 


For whole work, $2,296 


1,800 00 


8 


- 


- 


For 36-inch pipes, $58 and $59, and for special cast- 
ings, $120 per ton of 2,000 pounds. 




9 


July 28, 1917 


- 


For transmission line with telephone circuit complete, 
ready for regular operation, $74,477. 


34,442 55 


10 


Dec. 21, 1914 


- 


See previous report, 


30,692 47 


11 



4 All bids rejected, as appropriation was not sufficient for doing work proposed. 

5 Contract based upon bid of $6.25 per M kilowatt hours for entire output. Other bid for portion of 
output. 



144 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Contracts made and pending during 





1. 

Number 


2. 


3. 

Num- 


Amount 


of Bid. 


6. 




4. 


5. 






of 


WORK. 


ber of 


Next to 
Lowest. 




Contractor. 




Contract. 




Bids. 


Lowest. 




12 


46-M 1 


1,500 tons anthracite screen- 
ings for Chestnut Hill pump- 
ing stations. 


-3 


_3 


_3 


C. W. Claflin & Co., 
Boston. 


13 


47-Mi 


450 tons bituminous coal for 


Arling- 


$4.78 per 


$4. 70 2 per 


Garfield & Proctor 






Arlington pumping station 


ton 


ton. 


ton. 


Coal Co., Boston. 






and 120 tons for Hyde Park 


station, 












pumping station. 


3. 
Hyde 
Park 

station, 
2. 


$4. 50 2 per 
ton. 


$4.48 per 
ton. 




14 


49-M i 


4,500 tons bituminous coal for 


3 


$4.33 per 


$4,282 per 


E. Russell Norton, 






Chestnut Hill pumping sta- 




ton. 


ton. 


Boston. 






tions. 










15 


50-M 1 


Superstructure of garage at 
Chestnut Hill Reservoir. 


11 


8,100 00 


8,018 00- 


Crowley & Hickey, 
Boston. 


16 


51-M 


Sale and purchase of electric 
energy to be developed at 
Wachusett Dam in Clinton. 


1 




$5.30 per 

M kilowatt 

hours. 


New England Power 
Co. & Edison Electric 
Illuminating (Jo. of 
Boston. 


17 


52-M 


2,000 tons anthracite screen- 


Chest- 


$5.15 per 


$4,202 per 


Dexter & Carpenter, 






ings for Chestnut Hill pump- 


nut 


ton, sub- 


ton, sub- 


Inc., Boston. 






ing station, 240 tons for 


Hill 


ject to 


ject to 








Arlington pumping station. 


sta- 
tions, 

2. 
Arling- 
ton 
station , 
2. 


change in 

freight 

rate. 

$6 per ton, 

subject to 

change in 

freight 

rate. 


change in 
freight 
rate. 
$4,652 per 
ton, sub- 
ject to 
change in 
freight 
rate. 


• 


18 


53-M 


400 tons anthracite screenings 
for Spot Pond pumping sta- 
tion. 


1 




$5.30 2 per 
ton, sub- 
ject to 
change in 
freight 
rate. 


Locke Coal Co., Mai- 
den, Mass. 


19 


54-M 


4,000 tons bituminous coal for 


Chest- 


$8.35 per 


$7.35 2 per 


Shaftsbury Coal and 






Chestnut Hill pumping sta- 


nut 


ton, sub- 


ton, sub- 


Coke Co., Inc., New 






tions, 400 tons for Arlington 


Hill 


ject to 


ject to 


York, N. Y. 






pumping station. 


sta- 
tions, 

2. 
Arling- 
ton 
station, 
1. 


change in 

freight 

rate. 


change in 
freight 
rate. 
$7,802 per 
ton, sub- 
ject to 
change in 
freight 
rate. 




20 


55-M 


800 tons bituminous coal for 


2 


$11 per ton, 


$8,702 per 


E. Russell Norton, 






Spot Pond pumping station. 




delivered 
at station. 


ton, sub- 
ject to 

change in 
freight 
rate or 

in mining 

wage scale, 

f . 0. b. 

cars, 

Melrose. 


Boston. 



1 Contract completed. 



2 Contract based upon this bid. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



145 



the Year 1917 — Water Works — Continued. 



7. 

Date of Con- 
tract. 



8. 

Date of 
Completion 
of Contract. 



9. 



Prices of Principal Items of Contracts. 



10. 

Value of 

Work done 

Dec. 31, 

1917. 



June 7, 1916 



June 9, 1916 



Apr. 9, 1917 



July 13, 1917 



June 15, 1916 



Sept. 29, 1916 



Jan. 13, 1917 



June 4, 1917 



June 21, 1917 



June 15, 1917 



June 6, 1917 



July 9, 1917 



May 28, 1917 



See previous report, 



See previous report, 



$1,201 00 



2,668 96 



12 



13 



See previous report, 



See previous report, 



19,117 95 

8,029 85 



Maximum amount required to be taken, 7 million 
kilowatt hours per year; contract to continue for 
10 years from completion of transmission line being 
constructed under Contract No. 385. 

For anthracite screenings delivered on cars at the 
Chestnut Hill pumping stations, $4.20 per ton of 
2,240 pounds, and on cars at the Arlington pumping 
station, $4.65 per ton of 2,240 pounds; price in each 
case subject to advance in freight rate. 



6,020 39 



14 

15 
16 

17 



For anthracite screenings delivered in bins at the Spot 
Pond pumping station, $5.30 per ton of 2,240 
pounds. 



For bituminous coal delivered on cars at Chestnut 
Hill pumping stations, $7.35 per ton of 2,240 pounds ; 
and on cars at the Arlington pumping station, $7.80 
per ton of 2,240 pounds, price in each case subject to 
advance in freight rate. 



For bituminous coal delivered on cars at the Melrose 
station on the Boston & Maine Railroad, $8.70 per 
ton of 2,240 pounds, subject to advance in freight 
rate and on basis of mining wage scale in effect May 
4, 1917. 



1,906 84 



15,020 37 



5,556 13 



It 



19 



20 



3 Competitive bids were not received. 



146 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Contracts made and pending during 



21 
22 

23 

24 
25 

26 



27 
28 



1. 

Number 

of 
Contract. 



56-M 

57-M 

58-M» 

59-M 

60-Mi 



Agree- 
ment. 



Special 
Order. > 

Special 
Order. ] 



2. 

WORK. 



Venturi meter tube, register 
and chart recorder. 



Vertical fire-tube boiler for 
Clinton Sewerage pumping 
station. 

Feed-water heater for Chest- 
nut Hill pumping station. 

Ash conveyor for Spot Pond 
pumping station. 

Pelton motor and generator 
for Spot Pond pumping sta- 
tion. 

Sale and purchase of electric 
energy to be developed at 
Wachusett Dam after expira- 
tion of Contract No. 22-M 
and until energy is delivered 
under Contract No. 51-M, 
which cannot be done until 
the completion of the trans- 
mission line being con- 
structed under Contract 
No. 385. 

Plumbing at Sudbury power 
station, Southborough. 

Valves for use in connection 
with centrifugal pumping 
unit for Northern Extra 
High Service pumping sta- 
tion (Contract No. 382). 



3. 

Num- 
ber of 
Bids. 



3 s 

3 

2 



Amount of Bid. 



Next to 
Lowest. 



$2,100 00 

538 00 
1,250 00 



214 00 
540 30 



5. 

Lowest. 



-» 

$1,950 00 

525 00 
609 00 

-3 



208 00 2 
439 492 



Contractor. 



Builders Iron Foundry, 
Providence, R. I. 



Edward P. Brock & 
Co., Boston. 

George J. Hagan Co., 
Boston. 

Pelton Water Wheel 
Co., Inc., New York, 
N. Y. 

New England Power 
Co., Boston. 



J. B. Moulton, Fram- 
ingham, Mass. 

Jenkins Brothers, Bos- 
ton. 



1 Contract completed. 

2 Contract based upon this bid. 

3 Competitive bids were not received. 

6 All bids rejected on account of abnormally high prices. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



147 



the Yeae 1917 — Water Works — Continued. 



7. 

Date of Con- 
tract. 



8. 

Date of 
Completion 
of Contract. 



9. 



Prices of Principal Items of Contracts. 



10. 

Value of 

Work done 

Dec. 31, 

1917. 



Sept. 26, 1917 



Oct. 15, 1917 

Oct. 19, 1917 

June 11, 1917 

Oct. 1, 1916 



Nov. 28, 1916 
Aug. 23, 1917 



Nov. 28, 1917 



Oct. 27, 1917 



Feb. 1, 1917 



Oct. 10, 1917 



For a 2-inch extra heavy meter tube having a range of 
from 1,360 to 17,600 pounds per hour and a Type V 
register-indicator recorder, $725. 



For double-coil Type A, American Standard Feed- 
water Heater, $525. 

For Hagan steam jet ash conveyor, 



For 18-inch motor with direct connected 2J^ kilowatt 
generator, $545. 



See previous report, 



See previous report, 



For 12 4-inch and 2 3-inch extra heavy iron body, com- 
position mounted Globe valves, $439.49. 



$725 00 



520 21 



545 00 



45,472 25 



208 00 
430 70 



21 

22 

23 
24 
25 

26 



27 
28 



7 Agreement made with New England Power Company, with which the Connecticut River Trans- 
mission Company, the contractor under Contract No. 22-M, was consolidated. 



148 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Contracts made and pending during the Year 1917 — Water Works — 

Concluded. 
Summary of Contracts, 1895 to 1917, inclusive. 1 



Value of 

Work done Dec. 

31, 1917. 



Distribution Department, 8 contracts, 

Wachusett Department, 1 contract, .... 

382 contracts completed from 1896 to 1916, inclusive, 



Deduct for work done on 11 Sudbury Reservoir contracts by the city of Boston, 
Total of 391 contracts, 



$28,491 88 

34,442 55 

17,378,082 63 



$17,441,017 06 
512,000 00 



$16,929,017 06 



1 In this summary contracts charged to maintenance are excluded. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



149 



O 

X 
Q 

H 

Pk 
Pk 






o 
o 



O 



© 
•<s> 

J- 






s 

o 



o 

n 
< 





o 


■«* 


US 


CO 




OS 


o 


■* 


C3S 


CM 


CM 


o 


CO 




•sj^ox 


oo 


Oa 


© 


CM 


CO 


!>• 


1— ( 


«o 


CO 


CO 


oo 


. CM 


CM 


US 


CN 


o 


CO 


os 


o 


o 


o 


t*< 


^H 


eo 


,_( 


o 


r~ 


_l 




eo 


■* 


CO 


eo 


T* 


-* 


-* 


■<* 


•* 


■* 


■* 


** 


eo 


,"* 




oa 


-* 


■<»< 


00 


oo 


OS 


CO 


o 


o 


«o 


o 


ir^ 


_ 


rt 


•aaqraaoaQ 


o 


eo 


os 


us 


oo 


lr~ 


CO 


OS 


r- 


eo 


oo 


>« 


eo 


00 






cm 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CN 


CN 




us 


OS 




CO 


CO 


OS 


CO 


1^ 


OO 


00 


o 


US 


m 




•jaqraaAojsj 




CO 


OS 


US 


CM 


CM 


CM 


-* 


CM 


o 




CM 


CM 


eo 




OO 


tr^ 


os 


t~- 


^ 


■># 




eo 


CO 


00 


US 


■>* 


CO 


us 


•jaqo^oQ 


1—1 


eo 


CM 


CN 


-* 


CM 


m 


-* 


eo 


CO 


OS 


OS 


o 


CO 


SO 


CO 


CO 


US 


us 


us 


»o 


CO 


CO 


CO 


>o 


US 


CO 


US 




CM 


OS 




OO 


HO 


o 






t- 


00 


OS 


OS 


o 


CN 


•jaqma^deg 


CN 


CM 


o 


CM 


■^ 


us 


CO 


lO 


t^ 


OS 


b- 


■* 


CN 


US 






OS 


CO 


CO 


us 




Tj< 


o 


OS 


o 


CO 


eo 


CO 


o 


•^sn3ny 


CO 


<M 


CM 


OS 


CO 


*■"! 


t^ 


"1 


t> 


"S 


eo 


t^ 


■* 


-* 




CO 


us 


CO 


us 


CO 


CO 


>o 


t^ 


m 


t^ 


CO 


»o 


-* 


CO 




«* 


00 


r~ 


t^ 


■^ 


us 


CO 


o 


CM 


o 


CM 




CN 


^ 


•Apif 


00 

o 




CO 


■* 


o 




o 


CM 


O 


o 


CM 


-* 


CN 






CO 


CO 


t>. 


co 


CO 


oo 


«o 




CO 


CM 


CO 


00 


t~ 


CO 


•aunf 


CO 


00 


■* 


CM 


CM 


CM 


o 


CO 


CO 


00 


1-H 


CM 


■* 


CN 


"* 


■* 


■"* 


■f 


T* 


■* 


-* 


-* 


■"* 


CO 


•* 


•* 


-* 


■* 




00 


US 


•«* 


t>. 


OS 


o 


o 


co 


OS 


CM 


CM 


CO 


OS 


CO 


'iCBpi 


CO 


t^ 


OS 


""* 


00 


t~- 


t>- 


-* 


00 


CO 


t^ 


US 


oo 


OS 


CO 


eo 


CO 


•* 


■«* 


■* 


■* 


«o 


■* 


US 


•* 


■* 


CO 


•* 




OS 


t^ 


us 


O 


CO 


eo 


CM 


"tH 


t^ 




CM 


"* 


o 




•judy 


00 


oo 


CO 


00 


CM 


t* 


CO 


CO 


CO 


o 


CM 


CO 


oo 


■* 




1-1 


1-1 


'"' 


1-H 


CM 


CM 


<M 


CN 


CM 


eo 


CO 


CM 


'"' 


CN 




00 


!>• 


t- 


1-H 


OS 


O 


CO 


^ 


CM 


_ 


CD 


CO 




CO 


•qoxBjn 


CM 


CO 


o 


00 


CO 


CN 


t^ 


CM 


OO 


oo 


US 


CD 


CM 


OS 


CO 


■>* 


■* 


■* 


«*< 


us 


■* 


US 

/ 


■* 


Tt< 


■* 


■* 


■* 


•* 




00 


^ 


o 


eo 


us 


rt< 


•* 


1-- 


^ 


oo 


CO 


CM 


US 


00 


•^xemqa^ 


CO 


os 


OS 


t>- 


CO 


CO 


CD 


t^ 


oo 


CO 


«o 


00 


o 


CO 




CM 


eo 


CM 


CN 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


eo 


CN 




us 


CM 


T* 


ir^ 


© 


CO 


OS 


t~ 


OO 


OS 




«o 


t^- 


o 


•AjBtlUBf 


1—1 


t^ 


<M 


eo 


CM 


"■* 


-* 


00 


CM 


CO 


■>*< 


■* 


eo 


us 


CO 


eo 


CO 


eo 


eo 


eo 


CO 


eo 


CO 


eo 


CO 


CO 


CO 


eo 




























T3 
































-o 






























A 




























o 




H 


























03 


03 






















tn 






-kJ 


& 










i 




a 

03 






> 






a> 

■p. 
3 


>> 
u 

3 












S3 


H 






ai 




r * 


X, 


^2 




s 






„ 


w 


c3 

J5 





6 




tf 




c3 


03 


3 




s 


c 
o 


bB 


C 
O 






s 

< 


'? 


c3 

3 


— 




o 


CO 




o 


en 

s- 
CS 

CD 

1-5 


c 

-*> 
CO 


o 


3 
3 


1 


O 

O 


o 
O 


c 


t5 

c 
o 


a 

OS 
U 
(0 

> 
< 


4) 
M 
03 
h 
0) 
> 


a> 
fee 

03 

hi 
o 

> 






' 












o 


ai 




-< 




•paqsia^B^ 


•paqsja^B^ 


C3 


^3 


o 

a 
m 










^^asnqo'B^ 


Ainqpng 




H) 


o 









150 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Table No. 2. — Rainfall in Inches at Jefferson, Mass., in 1917. 



Day of Month. 


>> 

3 

3 
C 
c8 


>> 

d 

3 

9 


XI 

c 

h 

S 


< 


>> 


c 
3 

■"9 


>> 


as 

3 
Ml 
3 
< 


i 

B 

■** 
a 


u 



S 

a 

O 


u 

a 

> 

55 


§ 


1, 










- 


0.083 


- 


- 


0.68 


- 


- 


- 


0.16 


- 


- 


0.651 


2, 


































3, 
4, 
5, 










0.89* 


2 


0.03» 

2 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 












0.95 


1.571 


1.823 


- 


2 


2 


- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


- 


6, 










- 


- 


- 


2 


0.86 : 


0.27 


- 


- 


0.08 


0.50 


- 


- 


7, 










- 


- 


- 


0.873 


2 


0.16 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


8, 










- 


- 


0.38 


- 


2 


0.19 


- 


- 


0.28 


2 


- 


0.293 


9, 










0.12 


0.45 1 


- 


0.073 


2 


- 


- 


0.07 


- 


0.21 


- 


- 


10, 










- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


2 


- 


0.24 


- 


- 


- 


- 


11, 










- 


- 


0.573 


- 


2 


2 


0.75 


- 


- 


0.09 


- 


- 


12, 










.- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


1.09 


- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


- 


13, 










2 


- 


- 


- 


0.413 


- 


- 


0.36 


- 


0.68 


- 


2 


14, 










0.63» 


- 


0.18» 


- 


- 


0.31 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1.651 


15, 










- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.63 


0.06 


- 


- 


0.23 


- 


- 


16, 










- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.96 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


17, 










- 


- 


0.413 


- 


- 


0.55 


- 


1.23 


2 


- 


- 


- 


18, 










- 


- 


- 


0.17 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.36 


0.07 


- 


- 


19, 










- 


0.24i 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


- 


20, 










- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.51 


- 


- 


21, 










2 


- 


- 


0.24 


- 


- 


- 


1.31 


- 


- 


- 


- 


22, 










0.49 3 


0.06 1 


- 


- 


2 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.683 


- 


23, 










- 


- 


2 


- 


0.74 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


24, 










- 


0.41 


0.423 


- 


- 


0.31 


0.37 


0.19 


- 


1.97 


- 


- 


25, 










- 


- 


- 


- 


0.173 


- 


- 


0.11 


- 


- 


- 


- 


26, 










- 


2 


- 


0.13 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


27, 










2 


1.10 


0.793 


0.30 s 


- 


0.20 


- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


- 


28, 










2 


- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


- 


- 


0.12 


0.45 


0.14' 


0.051 


29, 










0.36' 


- 


0.07 


- 


0.89 


019 


- 


2 


- 


- 


- 


- 


30, 










- 


- 


- 


0.09 


- 


- 


- 


1.78 


029 


1.66 


- 


- 


31, 










0.283 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.57» 


- 


T 


otals 


• 


3.72 


3.91 


4.67 


1.87 


3.75 


4.86 


1.18 


5.29 


1.29 


6.37 


1.39 


2.64 



1 Snow. 



Total for the year, 40.94 inches. 
2 Rainfall included in that of following day. 



3 Rain and snow. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



151 





Table No. 3. 


— Rainfall in Inches at Framingham, Mass.> 


in 1917. 




Day of Month. 


>> 

u 

OS 

3 
3 
c8 


>> 

>- 

C3 

3 
t- 

03 

fa 


J3 
O 

eS 


ft 

< 


>> 


03 

c 

3 

•-5 




<n 

3 

bo 

3 
< 


u 
o 

s 

a 

03 


u 

03 
O 

o 

O 


CO 

s 

03 

> 
o 


M 
03 

Xi 

B 

o 
o 

03 

Q 


1, • • ... 


- 


0.18 


- 


- 


2 


- 


- 


- 


0.09 


- 


- 


2 


2, 










- 


- 


2 


0.01 


0.60 


0.05 


0.04 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1.02 3 


3, 










0.46 f 


- 


0.061 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


4, 










- 


2 


0.271 


- 


2 


- 


0.11 


- 


- 


0.01 


- 


0.021 


5, 










0.96 


0.84' 


2.041 


2 


2 


0.03 


- 


~ . 


- 


2 


- 


- 


6, 










- 


- 


- 


2 


1.69 


- 


- 


- 


0.02 


0.31 


- 


- 


7, 










- 


- 


- 


1.125 


- 


2 


- 


~ 


- 


- 


- 


- 


8, 










- 


- 


0.37 


2 


- 


2 


- 


- 


0.20 


- 


- 


0.683 


9, 










0.05 


0.34 s 


- 


0.33 1 


0.02 


0.44 


- 


0.84 


- 


2 


- 


- 


10, 










- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


0.48 


- 


2 


- 


- 


11, 










0.03 ! 


- 


2 


- 


- 


2 


0.88 


- 


- 


0.25 


- 


- 


12, 










- 


- 


0.56 s 


0.01 


2 


1.61 


0.02 


- 


- 


2 


- 


2 


13, 










2 


0.02i 


- 


0.01 


0.24 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.48 


- j 


2 


14, 










0.68 


- 


2 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1.041 


15, 










- 


- 


0.08 s 


- 


- 


0.15 


- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


- 


16, 










- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.25 


- 


- 


- 


0.03 


- 


- 


17, 










- ■ 


- 


31 s 


- 


- 


1.22 


- 


1.25 


2 


- 


- 


- 


18, 
19, 
20, 










- 


2 


- 


0.06 


- 


- 


0.05 


- 


0.73 


0.05 

2 


- 


- 










- 


0.243 


- 


2. 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.16 


0.61 


0.02 


- 


21, 










2 


- 


- 


0.45 


2 


- 


- 


0.66 


- 


- 


2 


- 


22, 










0.56 s 


0.041 


- 


- 


2 


- 


- 


2 


- 


- 


2 


- 


23, 










- 


2 


2 


- 


0.66 


- 


- 


2 


- 


- 


0.66 


- 


24, 










- 


0.30 


0.25 


- 


- 


0.21 


- 


0.20 


- 


2 


- 


2 


25, 










- 


- 


- 


- 


0.01 


- 


- 


0.05 


- 


2.10 


- 


0.033 


26, 










- 


2 


- 


2 


' - 


0.22 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


27, 










2 


0.68 


1.10 


0.42 


0.41 


- 


0.05 


- 


- 


2 


- 


- 


28, 










0.07 


- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


- 


- 


0.16 


0.36 


0.141 


- 


29, 










0.08' 


- 


0.08 


2 


2 


2 


- 


2 


- 


- 


- 


- 


30, 










- 


- 


- 


0.02 


1.07 


0.10 


- 


2.63 


0.14 


1.04 


0.47 s 


- 


31, 










0.57 1 


- 


0.08 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Totals, 


3.46 


2.64 


5.20 


2.43 


4.70 


4.28 


1.15 


6.11 


1.50 


5.24 


1.29 


2.79 



i Snow. 



Total for the year, 40.79 inches. 
2 Rainfall included in that of following day. 



3 Rain and snow. 



152 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Table No. 4. — Rainfall in Inches at Chestnut Hill Reservoir, 1917. 



Date. 


Amount. 


Duration. 


Date. 


Amount. 


Duration. 


Jan. 3, . 




.491 


1.20 p.m. to 


9.25 p.m. 


May 1, . 


} 


.65 


9.45 a.m. to 




Jan. 5, . 


} 


.94 


9.30 a.m. to 




May 2, . 






4.25 a.m. 


Jan. 6, . 






1.45 a.m. 


May 4, . 


} 


1.88 


11.55 p.m. to 




Jan. 9, . 




.14 


6.05 p.m. to 


9.15 p.m. 


May 6, . 






10.45 a.m. 


Jan. 11, . 




.121 


9.05 a.m. to 


2.10 p.m. 


May 9, . 




.11 


5.10 a.m. to 


4.15 p.m. 


Jan. 14, . 




.73 2 


1.40 a.m. to 12.30 p.m. 


May 12, . 


} 


.39 


10.50 a.m. to 




Jan. 21, . 


} 


.551 


8.35 p.m. to 




May 13, . 






3.40 a.m. 


Jan. 22, . 






4.00 A.M. 


May 13, . 


} 


.27 


6.55 a.m. to 




Jan. 27, . 




.121 


11.30 p.m. to 




May 14, . 






2.00 A.M. 


Jan. 28, . 






7.30 p.m. 


May 22, . 


} 


.31 


3.45 a.m. to 




Jan. 29, . 


I 


.102 


5.30 p.m. to 




May 23, . 






6.45 p.m. 


Jan. 30, . 


/ 






4.00 A.M. 


May 25, . 




.04 


8.30 a.m. to 


4.20 p.m. 


Jan. 31, . 




.50 2 


6.50 p.m. to 1] 


May 27, . 




.35 


10.20 a.m. to 


8.30 p.m. 












May 28, . 


} 


1.32 


11.50 A.M. to 












Total, 




3.69 






May 29, . 
Total, 






8.15 p.m. 






5.32 
















Feb. 1, . 




.152 


1.20 a.m. to 10.00 A.M. 












Feb. 4, . 


} 


.77i 


9.35 p.m. to 


6.45 p.m. 












Feb. 5, . 












Feb. 9, . 




.40 2 


7.30 a.m. to 














Feb. 10, . 


J 






3.30 a.m. 












Feb. 13, . 


} 


.03 1 


10.30 p.m. to 




June 2, 




.09 


7.00 a.m. to 


7.25 p.m. 


Feb. 14, . 






1.50 A.M. 


June 6, 




.04 


12.30 a.m. to 


2.45 a.m. 


Feb. 19, . 


I 


.301 


9.45 p.m. to 




June 7, 


} 


.23 


6.15 a.m. to 




Feb. 20, . 


f 






3.30 a.m. 


June 9, 






7.30 a.m. 


Feb. 23, . 


i 


.27 


8.10 p.m. to 




June 10, 


} 


1.24 


8.30 a.m. to 




Feb. 24, . 






8.45 a.m. 


June 12, 






7.30 a.m. 


Feb. 25, . 


I 


.76 


12.30 p.m. to 




June 15, 


}■ 


1.70 


6.00 a.m. to 




Feb. 26, . 


/ 






11.45 p.m. 


June 17, 






7.35 p.m. 












June 24, 




.24 


2.30 a.m. to 


7.30 a.m. 








Total, 




2.68 






June 26, 


} 


.17 


11.55 p.m. to 














June 27, 
June 29, 


.11 


5.40 p.m. to 


3.15 A.M. 


Mar. 3, 






12.30 a.m. to 




10.35 p.m. 




.07i 


7.00 A.M. 












Mar. 4, 


} 


I.861 


5.45 a.m. to 




Total, 




3.82 






Mar. 5, 






9.00 p.m. 












Mar. 8, 




.47 
.19i 


5.20 a.m. to 

1.50 A.M. to 


2.45 p.m. 
8.30 a.m. 












Mar. 11, 












Mar. 11, 


} 


.45 


8.30 a.m. to 














Mar. 12, 






1.55 A.M. 












Mar. 14, 




.05 


4.20 p.m. to 1( 


July 2, . 




.04 


6.20 a.m. to 


7.30 a.m. 


Mar. 17, 




.29 


1.15 p.m. to 


9.30 p.m. 


July 2, . 




.12 


9.25 p.m. to 


9.50 p.m. 


Mar. 23, 


} 


.17 


9.45 p.m. to 




July 3, . 


I 


.11 


5.15 p.m. to 




Mar. 24, 






9.30 a.m. 


July 4, . 


r 






4.50 a.m. 


Mar. 27, 


} 


1.07 


2.45 p.m. to 




July 11, . 


} 


.23 


12.55 p.m. to 




Mar. 28, 






2.15 A.M. 


July 12, . 






5.15 A.M. 


Mar. 29, 




.09 


6.15 a.m. to 


1.30 p.m. 


July 27, . 




.50 


3.45 p.m. to 


5.30 p.m. 


Apr. 1, 




.10 


2.45 a.m. to 


7.30 a.m. 




























Total, 




1.00 














Total, 




4.81 
















Apr. 2, 


| 


.04 


7.45 p.m. to 














Apr. 3, 






11.00 a.m. 












Apr. 6, 


} 


1.40 


2.15 a.m. to 




Aug. 9, 


} 


3.70 


3.40 a.m. to 




Apr. 7, 






4.55 p.m. 


Aug. 10, 






10.45 a.m. 


Apr. 9, 




.7H 


4.10 a.m. to 


1.45 p.m. 


Aug. 17, 




.78 


8.35 a.m. to 


8.30 p.m. 


Apr. 18, 




.09 


9.50 a.m. to 


3.15 p.m. 


Aug. 21, 


} 


.39 


3.45 p.m. to 




Apr. 20, 


} 


.21 


6.20 A.M to 




Aug. 22, 






1.25 A.M. 


Apr. 21, 






4.45 a.m. 


Aug. 23, 


} 


.28 


1.50 a.m. to 




Apr. 21, 


) 


.22 


6.00 p.m. to 




Aug. 24, 






8.10 A.M. 


Apr. 22, 






12.30 a.m. 


Aug. 29, 


} 


1.62 


6.00 p.m. to 




Apr. 26, 


} 


.29 


9.30 a.m. to 




Aug. 30, 






6.30 a.m. 


Apr. 27, 






4.30 a.m. 


Aug. 30, 




.73 


5.15 p.m. to 


7.30 p.m. 


Apr. 27, 




.05 


8.30 a.m. to 


5.30 p.m. 




























Total, 




7.50 






Total, 




3.01 




1 









1 Snow. 



2 Rain and snow. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



153 



Table No. 4. — Rainfall in Inches at Chestnut Hill Reservoir, 1917 — 

Concluded. 



Date. 


Amount. 


Duration. 


Date. 


Amount. 


Duration. 


Sept. 1, 




.04 


11.45 A.M. 


to 4.15 p.m. 


Nov. 21, 




.03 


3.00 a.m. to 


5.50 a.m. 


Sept. 6, 




.04 


10.35 a.m. 


to 12.15 p.m. 


ISfov. 21, 


} 


.45 


7.30 p.m. to 




Sept. 8, 




.12 


4.00 A.M. 


to 8.30 A.M. 


Nov. 23, 






2.30 a.m. 


Sept. 17, 


} 


1.18 


8.00 p.m. 


to 


Nov. 23, 




.04 


7.00 p.m. to 


9.30 p.m. 


Sept. 18, 






12.20 p.m. 


Nov. 28, 




.211 


7.00 a.m. to 


2.30 p.m. 


Sept. 20, 




.30 


1.50 p.m. 


to 4.20 p.m. 


Nov. 30, 


} 


.352 


4.25 p.m to 




Sept. 28, 




.21 


4.30 a.m. 


to 12.30 p.m. 


Dec. 1, 






7.30 a.m. 


Sept. 30, 




.09 


1.50 p.m. 


to 8.15 p.m. 




























Total, 




1.08 






Total, 


1.98 














Dec. 1, 


} 


.942 


7.30 a.m. to 
















Oct. 5. . 


} 


.37 


7.30 a.m. 


to 


Dec. 2, 






3.15 a.m. 


Oct. 6, . 






5.45 a.m. 


Dec. 4, 


} 


.061 


9.15 p.m. to 




Oct. 9, . 




.16 


3.45 p.m. 


to 10.30 p.m. 


Dec. 5, 






1.30 A.M. 


Oct. 11, . 




.25 


12.15 A.M. 


to 5.00 p.m. 


Dec. 8, 




.53 


8.30 p.m. to 11 


Oct. 12, . 


} 


.59 


9.40 p.m. 


to 


Dec. 12, 


} 


.051 


7.50 p.m. to 




Oct. 13, . 






12.45 a.m. 


Dec. 13, 






9.30 a.m. 


Oct. 15, . 




.07 


6.50 a.m. 


to 5.00 p.m. 


Dec. 14, 




.692 


12.15 a.m. to 


6.00 a.m. 


Oct. 18, . 




.04 


5.00 A.M. 


to 7.30 A.M. 


Dec. 16, 


} 


.041 


10.00 p.m. to 




Oct. 19, . 


} 


.56 


9.30 p.m. 


to 


Dec. 17, 






9.45 a.m. 


Oct. 20, . 






4.40 a.m. 


Dec. 28, 




.041 


7.30 a.m. to 1( 


Oct. 24, . 




2.53 


5.55 a.m. 


to 9.00 p.m. 


















Oct. 27, . 


I 


.31 


9.45 p.m. 


to 


Total, 




2.35 






Oct. 28, . 


} 


1.50 


11.30 p.m. 


2.50 a.m. 
to 












Oct. 29, . 












Oct. 30, . 






7.30 p.m. 












Total, 


6.38 





1 Snow. 



Total for year, 43.62 inches. 



2 Rain and snow. 



154 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 













































"CM 


^N 






CO 


*¥ 


CO 


~ 


CC 


B 


oo oo 


CO 


op 


O0 TJ* 


co 


<— 


tO 


CO 


CJS 


C-J 


-*< 


tO 


eo 


CO 


t-4 


OB 






3 

40 


00 


Oi 


"*f- 


-t- 


t^ 


IO IO 


5 


55 


O t^ 


DO 


LO 


<x> 


r^ 




r» 


IQ 


CO 


■<*< 


CM 










^ 


t-~ 


m 


CO 


to 


O0 a 


co 


CO 


035 110 


r^ 


Tf 


t^ 


or 


o 


_ 


or 


-r« 


CO 


t» 


CO 


5 






O 

H 


»o 


tO 


-? 


>o 


«rj 


^j< — 


■w 


■"?> 


TJ< -rr 


co 


■<r 


CO 


co 


4 


^T> 


CO 


«♦ 


-*■ 


CO 


a 








■ 

S . 




c; 


CO 


IQ 


SO 


O a 


00 


OS 


CO o 


CO 


ss 


f 




tO 


co 


a 








CO 


00 






■*t« 


s 


e 


""" 


re 


eo a 


OO 


t^ 


CM ■«»< 


e 


Ce 


co 


o 


ss 


t^ 


CO 


1—1 


00' 


CO 


CO 


o 






O CP 


CO 


re 


CM 


eo 


OS 


t-» CO 


CM 


CO 


Tt< ^»< 


CO 


CO 


CO 


eo 


■"«» 


OJ 


oo 


to 


Ol 


CM 


>o 


"«»< 






&X) 








































oo 








Q 
















































1 

© - 


CO 


_^ 


«H 


Tf 


CO 


CO CO 


r-j 


CI 


IC TJ< 


iO 


oo 


r^ 


T* 


C-l 


a 


h- 


CO 


to 


tQ 


o 


00 






co 


DO 


en 


^ 


T}< 


Ol CO 


cO 


VC 


CM t^- 


o 


CO 


*- ' 


" - 


e 


tO 


a 


— < 


— 1 


CM 


oo 


CM 






£ s 


t>» 


EC 


__ 


CO 


CO 


O CM 


„H 


C-4 


CM "5 


T-H 


T_ 


•cfi 


"C" 


"* 


CO 


CO 


oo 


CO 


_H 


00 


CO 






OJ2 








































CO 








fc 
















































In 


■*< 


■ 


C-) 


o 


o 


CO CO 


00 




U0 00 


CO 


C 


O 


«# 


cc- 


CO 


■oo 


tO 


^s 


eo 


00 


r^ 






J3 


a 


co 


t^ 


Si 


t- 


CO •^ 


t^ 


00 


CJ3 CO 


"-- 1 


t^ 


"* 


CO 


tO 


o 


00> 


o 


"* 


o 


00 


>* 






O 
a 


o 


t^ 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO ■"»< 


^ 


~ 


OO HO 


CQ 


** 


*-■ 


to 


CO 


CO 


' H 


CO 


'-' 


CO 


CM 


co 






O 
















































CD t-i 


CO 


IQ 


. 


CD 


o 


CO CO 


o 


o 


-H O 


"* 


§ 


CO 


•* 


r- 


■* 


to 


CO 




o 


a 


CM 








"" 


*"' 


-J< 


^ H 


CM OS 


CO 


OS 


CO U0 


o 


OO 


o 


^ H 


«* 


r* 


IQ 


OJ 


CM 


r^ 


M* 






+3 CD 
Q..O 

ID 


T-H 


CO 


Tj< 


CO 


co 


">*i CM 


to 


CO 


CM OS 


._ 


oo 


CO 


CO 


OS 


TM 


o 


_^ 


■^ 


_T 


^H 


CO 












































o- 






















































in 

5 


t~ 


. 


o 


00 


on 


IO 00 


or 


S3 


>* CO 


o 


Ci 


r- 


CO 


crs 


tO 


e 


o 


OS 


CO 


t^ 


o 






T* 


CO 


CO 


■"■' 


IQ 


a 00 


CO 


o 


CO CM 


-*l 


IQ 


OO 


«* 


00 


o 


tO 


a 


t^ 


•>* 


1—1 


CM 






co 


o 


CO 


CO 


Tt< 


CO CO 


CO 


CO 


Tj( »-< 


CO 


CO 


CO 


to 


OJ 


CO 


«* 


CO 


T- 1 


^ 


00 


•^ 






s 




•** 




































O0 








<1 


















































"5 


_ 


CO 


o 


CO 


t- CO 


•«f 


c; 


CM OO 


IC 


to 


OJ 


CO 


to 


r^ 


ITS 


o 


CO 


CM 


a 


a 






>> 


CO 


e 


00 


CO 


CO 


00 "<*l 


oo 


CO 


UO O 


oo 


e^j 


to 


tO 


CO 


co 


a 


co 


CO 


CM 


a 


o 






►■a 


00 


CO 


CO 


CO 


to 


CO CO 


CO 


<0) 


"3 OO 


CO 


■^ 


,_, 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


oo 


tO 


,_! 


to 


■<t< 












































oo 












. 


^ 


09 


_^ 


-H !>. 


^* 


esn 


U0 ■«»< 


os 


CO 


CO 


r^ 


on 


o 


o 


oo 


r>- 


t~» 


t^ 


CM 








*""* 


"- 1 


IQ 


IQ 


tO 


"5 CO 


■f 


OO 


OS iO 


CM 


o 


CO 


CO 


■* 


C5 


o 


1—1 


to 


■<»< 


*-' 


t^ 






"5 


CO 


IQ 


CO 


*-l 


CM O 


CO 


•«* 


if5 OO 


•-• 


CO 


»* 


CO 


o 


e 


CO 


CO 


CO 


**< 


00 


OO 






»-9 


















































O 


en 


CO 


^* 


CO 


Tti ■*}< 


C5 


co 


O0 CO 


>«n 


lO 


CO 


OS 


CO 


__ 




r^ 


* 


OS 


CO 


00 






>> 


O 


CO 


CO 


CO 


o 


CM CM 


at 


oo 


m os 


CO 


CO 




to 


t^ 


t^ 


o 


CO 


CO 


oo 


o 


oo 






03 


IQ 


CO 


_ 


-J< 


r^ 


CM T-H 


CM 


o 


CO CM 


»o 


Ol 


CO 


_, 


tO 


CO 


CO 


,_, 


CO 


eo 


_H 


eo 






s 








































t^ 










CO 


co 


■*< 


CO 


«# 


CO O 


iO 


o 


cm m 


o^ 






CO 


CO 


o 




o 


tO 


o 


to 


CM 






"E 


CO 


«* 


C5 


t^. 


CO 


CO <-l 


-* 


CO 


-H CO 


CO 


t^ 


o 


CO 


O 


a 


a 


OO 


CO 


00 


o 


t^. 






<M 


■^ 


,-1 


CM 


OS 


^ CO 


r>- 


CO 


OO CM 


CM 


to 


CO 


CO 


-* 


CO 


<* 


1— ( 


CO 


_l 


00 


CO 






< 
















































O 




i-^ 


IQ 


at 


OS 


t>- oo 


o 


US 


f~ CM 


r^ 


oo 


OS 


o 


OS 


oo 


co 


CO 


OS 


^ 


tQ 


CM 






O 


OJ 


t^ 


— i 


O0 


CM tO 


rt< 


» 


i-l 00 


t^ 


CO 


o 


t^ 


CO 


tO 


CO 


o 


co 


CM 


•<* 


•"• 






u 

03 


■* 


CO 


CO 


CO 


to 


UO CO 


CO 


CO 


UO ^ 


CO 


-* 


«-• 


CO 


tO 


»o 


-<J< 


o 


eo 


TJ( 


CO 

oo 


"* 






s 
















































1 


CO 


e 


N 


C35 


co 


rH CM 


CO 


C-5 


T*H CM 


Ol 


o 


-# 


CO 


CO 


to 


op 


OJ 


DO 


IQ 


CO 


00 






00 


CO 


^ 


CO 


"* 


Oi •* 


CO 


t^ 


r>- oo 


00' 




C-4 


«# 


■«*l 


to 


to 


co 


a 


o 


eo 


t^ 






— i- 


CM 


ec 


to 


00 




~H TJ< 


CN 




<M CM 


-^ 


CO 


to 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


to 


CO 


a 


oo 






a> c3 








































t>. 








fr 
















































>> 

03 


CO 


io 


CO 


op 


us 


CM iO 


el 


o 


C3S •*£ 
"■5 O0 


o 


C-4 


CO 




r^ 


00 


o 




o 


t^. 


a 


tO 






■«*< 


CO 


a 


tQ 


r~ 


t^ O0 


o 




-<»< 


tO 


oo 


C5S 


>Q 


co 


■* 


CO 


CO 


eo 


r^ 


CO 






3 

a 

03 


CO 


CO 


CO 


■«* 


*— < 


CM CM 


•^ 


CO 


CM CM 


CO 


CO 


•Q 


CO 


CI 


eo 


CO 


CD 


— 1 


oo 


CO 


CO 




















































►o 




























































1 






























































































































00 






BJ 










































§ 






< 










































<s 






W 










































>> 






^H 


• 






































o 
H 


CO 

0) 
U 
03 
u 

> 
< 








t^ 


on 


C5 






CM CO 


-r> 


iC 


CO t^ 


oo 


a 


e 




.i 


co 


-V 


>o 


CO 


t^ 










■tc 


Ba 




— 


o o 


— 


s 


S OS 




S 




























00 


GO 


30 






» Ci 


ft 


SB 




3S 


'— 


OS 


o> 


_. 


a 


C". 


a 


a 









No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



155 



&* 



> 0) 






<1 



3 



a> 

a 

3 






P. 



c3 



£ >> 



Ph 



c3 
3 

a 

i-5 



< 



OS 


«5 


(M 


CO 


(M 


00 


r^ 


o 


on 


«* 


*# 


CO 


o 


r^ 


id 


o 


CM 


CO 


CO 


"*< 


cm 


o 


ft 


on 


i— * 


»o 


"* 


iO 


o 


os 


•« 


»H 


•"< 


"<*< 


t>. 


' H 


iO 


o 


tr^ 


-<*< 


Ci 


o 


iO 


00 


CM 


t^. 


CO 


r^ 


~H 


oo 


CM 


CO 


m 


OS 


■* 


r- 


_i 


on 


■<*H 


ft 


<M 


t^ 


CO 


CD 


CM 


r>- 


ft 


CO 


ft 


_H 


on 


ft 


o 


CO 


CO 


IO 


r^ 


o 


•* 


■* 


>* 


ub 


<« 


CO 


•*< 


CO 


CO 


«* 


•* 


•^ 


-* 


iO 


■<# 


*o 


"^ 


■* 


^ti 


CO 


US 


-*i 


•<*< 


IO 


CO 


»o 


*# 


CM 


1^ 


r^ 


-*< 


CO 


CO 


o 


w 


r^ 


(M 


r^ 


CO 


© 


"f 


_ 


on 


CO 


CO 




m 


so 




00 


00 


■* 


OS 


CO 


00 


CO 


CO 


00 


ft 


CO 


lO 


rt 


t^ 


CO 


00 


•* 


-" 


CO 


c© 


1-1 


oo 


oo 


CO 


** 


CN 


CM 


t~ 


t~ 



OMO»<*NMNWi9eq^»««U5Mrtr(I^MNi«»HN 



CO CO © CM 
OO t^ 00 © 



oosoococoesio 
e^ococq^coo^ 



*cHi«ir5t>-eM»-<-«!tt»-i.-icMe©'**<CMt~e©^Heou3CMeoe©cocoeOeMio 



-«cM CM 00 CO © 



* in s o oo ft 'f 

t>- ft © CO "C* © CM 
MNN"5NkSfON<* 



■^oeo^HT^iooeoococNco 



co«*i©»-<.-i~hcmoo»-h©.-icm 



00*e«NHNNNNN»CO 



U3HMO(O^HHO^t»*'«»^M'*')liON*NMOOHN 



lON»NMN«-*i)l« 



^ ft N « 

-* O N •* 



«»NM«»NrtNWHMMH(»NW^MMi«NiB^tON 



•*ft-t>-»fl**<©eot— 

■^CO-«*<COiOOOOt>» 



NNHNW^NNCq 



CO CO O 

«o t* t*. 

CO CM CO 



CO O CO OS 
CM CM TM t» 



M * » 18 «* 



rtWiO^MMMrt^NiONW©^ 



TM CM t- t>» 

N O >o n 
N d ■* 



CM "3 CM 

CM •** I CO 

CO rt ^1 



r-l © 00 O0 



CMCOCMCOOeOCO"Si-ICM^^HCM 



O CO t» •*! 



ec n oo 



"5CO»OCM^HTj<^^cO^ICOcMt-CO"«*COi-lCM»OCOCMt»cO 



W'*oiococc^*n»Me'#wrtMinwiio?3HNcq'*'jift 



CMeOcMCO00t>.c©if3-*OS'— ieO©tf5t>-cOcMT>CMftc©OS©CO00cO 

^t<oocMeo^»o»oosooot*coeM^Hco»ooooosoocoooo^-<os 

CMi-ieOU5CMCO»OOCN«0'*'cO»«^»OCMt>.«'5CMTW'C(<CM'»t<cO^(^( 

m CO !>• 00 OS O — CM en "t* ift <o s oo*cTo"^cMco~^trw5co*t-^'on'os'o' 
t— t>-t>.t>-i--ooooooooooooooooooooososososesoosososcso 
oooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooocs 



o 



156 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



T3 
O 

o 






00 
■»"1 



00 






&3 
© 



e 

G3 



6 

w 

H 



d 




r^ 


CO 


CI 




oo 


oo 


IQ 


« 


« 


00 


ca 






CO CO 




t~ 


o 


03 


»- ' 


o 


■— I 


GO 


M 


■* 


CO 




r- 


CD 


CO 


t^ 


co 


r^ 


a os 


»o 


t^ 


CO 


-»j 


CO 


CO 


■Q 


CI 


ca 


•*♦< 


k* 


CO 


„ 


<a 


or 


O 


<* 


r^ 


CO 0" 1 


l_l 


t- 


•^< 


O 


"■5 


-* 


-*f 


-«f« 


** 


** 


■4 


co 


f 


CO 


co 


^r 


^* 


CO 


-<t" CO 


■* 




Tf 


H 


































°i 




01 »- 


03 


00 


■*• 


CI 




0B 


r^ 


-^ - 


iO 


a 


Q 


CO 


00 


o 


OS CM 




o 




CO 


w 


* H 


DS 


e 


-<f 


-*t« 


" 


o 


■^< 


CD 


-* 


■""' 


«* 


© <M 


oo 


CO 


OO 




OS 


CD 


CO 


C4 


*# 


<# 


-<rr 


CO 


■^ , 


ca 


DO 


iO 


CO 


CO 


m co 


<M 


CO 


CO 




































CO 




Q 


































~ 




i 

S . 

CD u 


o 


■Q 


CO 


CO 


r^ 


OS 


ca 


X 


oo 


0^ 


C<« 


Tf 


IQ 


CO 


OS GO 


1-H 


OS 


t^ 


OS 


>* 


iO 


r~ 


o 


CD 


"- -1 


OB 


CO 


*-* 


CO 


CO 


CD 


m 


!>. <M 


CO 


00 


CO 


> 0) 


(M. 


— 1 


rl 


— 


CI 


ca 


CO 


e 


CO 


<* 


<* 


CO 


cxi 


ca 


ca ca 


1—1 


IO 


CO 






































CM 


-* 


CI 


■* 


>* 


O 


r^ 


ua 


<o 


CD 


a 


IQ 


co 


o 


»« OS 


IO 


CO 


CO 


oo 


■** 


t^ 


CO 


ifl 


<* 


»H 


ta 


' H 


OO 


CD 


CO 


IO 


o 


a •>* 


CO 


CO 


oo 


O 


CM 


«* 


«* 


,_, 


^H 


CO 


•* 


ca 


_ 


^H 


CO 


ca 


>o 


__ 


<M »-< 


»o 


1* 


CO 




































CO 




o 






































O 






































2 . 
oi u 

-U Hi 


o 


** 


io 


o 


OO 


o 


CO 


r^ 


f 


a 


iC 


CD 


r- 


OS 


o o 


CM 


^ 


IO 


co 


IO 


t~- 


OO 


GO 


CO 


t«. 


03 


1^ 


Tf" 


t^ 


t^ 


t^ 


CI 


^H GO 


■o 


t^ 


CM 


CO 


"* 


,_! 


*o 


CD 


CO 


oo 


o 


M< 


ca 


ca 


„ 


CO 


o 


1— 1 — 


_ 


a 


CO 


co 


































CO 




o 






































GQ 






































ta 


». 


o 


r~ 


CO 


O 


ca 


r^ 


r»- 


CO 


ca 


-f 


IQ 


-<+ 


ca 


t~ -H 


o 


o 




3 

bfi 


»o 


<# 


CO 


CO 


t^ 


o 


O 


■a 


c-. 


CD 


a 


O 


CD 


00 


00 o 


■* 


CO 


a 


■«*! 


CO 


CO 


CO 


ca 


CO 


^-> 


f 


ca 


CI 


m< 


CO 


CO 


CO 


»n cm 


CO 


O0 


CO 


3 






































<J 










































-* 


r^ 


CO 


r^ 


ca 


CO 




C72 


CO 


C2 


"* 


o 


-f 


ca t~ 




CO 


CO 


>i 


t". 


OS 


c^ 


a 


rf 


■«** 


oo 


t^ 


IO 


o 


^^ 


ca 


CD 


f 


^H i—l 


»- 1 


o 


CO 


s 


iO 


eq 


<CI 


<-" 


IO 


CO 


«-• 


CO 


•H 


ca 


CO' 


CO 


CO 


CO 


oo io 


«"H 


CO 


CO 


t-a 








































oo 


C93 


US 


o 


O 




CO 


CD 




on 


CO 


CO 


00 


o 


IO t>- 


CO 


OS 


OS 


o 


CO 


00 


CI 


00 


o 


OB 


UO 


00 


oo 


CD 


>o 


"* 


a 


a 


co r>- 


CM 


O0 


o 


a 

3 


,_, 


« 


OS 


Ca 


IO 


CO 


CO 


o 


c^ 


<* 


ca 


o 


r- 1 


rH 


CO "^1 


■>* 


CM 


CO 


































CO 




1-8 


































~ 






CO 


co 


CO 


IO 




CO 


CO 




CO 


a 




IO 


1^ 


oo 


■* CO 


CO 


CO 


CM 


>> 


CM 


CO 


CI 


CD 


CO 


CO 


CD 


U2 


■<* 


ca 


o 


iO 


OS 


o 


t~ Ttl 


OS 


oo 


CO 


83 


»- 


i— t 


o 


Ca 


_, 


iO 


CO 


»o 


C4 


_- 


,_H 


<* 


CO 


CO 


^ eo 


■^1 


CM 


CO 


s 


































■«*< 






Q 


ro 


Oi 


1^ 


CI 


on 




oo 


r— 


IO 




r^ 


>o 


o 


OO OS 




t^ 


^ 


T73 


CO 




cs 


O0 


r~ 


oo 


^ 


oo 


CO 


t^ 


;^j 


CO 


ca 




TJ< i-H 


^f< 


<— ' 


IO 




of; 


Tf 


CI 


O0 


ca 


ca 


CO 




■«*i 


ca 


ca 


-* 


«* 


IO 


<M ■* 


CM 


CM 

IO 


co 


.3* 


t» 


>* 


CO 


CI 


iq 


ca 




ca 


CO 


■o 


o> 


co 


IO 


r^. 


IO CO 


CO 


■«*< 


CO 


•Q 


CO 


CO 


t^ 


^H 


co 


0B 


oo 


ca 


C<J 


IO 


>* 


1^ 


IQ 


o >-l 


a 


CO 


CO 


u 

S3 


CO 


O 


CO 


CI 


CO 


CO 


*-H 


CO 


>* 


o 


CO 


CD 


IO 


■* 


O "* 


•«*! 


r^ 


Ttl 


































GO 




3 






































i 

3 • 


<M 


00 


IQ 


o 


o 


ca 


r« 


CD 


OS 


o 


1^ 


r^ 


ca 


r^ 


O0 -< 


oo 


"tl 


CO 


"5 




a 


© 


ca 


OS 


"- 1 


IO 


t^ 


o 


t^ 


t^ 


■J0 


o 


IO OS 


CO 


■<«* 




,_, 


CO 


CO 


CO 


ca 


ca 


ca 


-*> 


■O 


IO 


ca 


CJ 


<ca 


-rf 


CO »o 


CM 


t>. 


■* 


o> o3 


































«>- 




fe 






































>. 


<M 


Ol 


a 


r— 


CD 


r~ 


oo 


o 


'00 


OS 


no 


>* 


r^ 


IO 


-^ CO 


o 


iO 


CO 


03 

3 


00 


IQ 


00 


00 


ca 


-* 


ca 


CD 


OB 


CO 


oo 


C73 


'-' 


00 


IO »o 


IO 


IO 


o 


,— , 


CI 


CO 


** 


•O 


ca 


CO 


CO 


CO 


»o 


ca 


ca 


CO 


CO 


CO ^h 


CO 


•* 


-**< 


3 


































t^ 




93 


































"-* 




Hj 






















































































































































03 






































s 


< 


































• 


§3 

>s 


>H 


































in 

'3 
o 
H 


CO 
9 

Si 

03 
1- 
9 

> 

< 






CI 


CO 


<* 


»c 


CD 


r- 


op 


a 


e 




Cl 


co 


-r 


IO CO 


t^ 








s 


2 


s 


s 


i 


s 


S 


s 


§ 


a 


a 


CT- 


a 


a 


OS OS 


OS 







M oo 

3 oo 

O rt 

- 

O (H 

co o 

> o 

. o 

5 a 



3 S 

- >> 

— <- 

M 3 

3 X! 

s 
sa 



•■a .^ 

-^ s? _, « 

« j^ "? = 



co « .3 

22 Q 



> 

03 

u 

o 

o 

i 

P 



3 ^ 

s §■ 



S3 bCt 
3 3 

o 1 

^^ 

03 - 
M 

.> 2 

CQ O 

3 X 



•s a 

S 3° 

2 03 

"° r^ 

S fe 



5 Q 



3 

q -a 



g 2 



3 X >> 



co 

22 m 

rt 3 

J 2 

F o 

3 

O O 



2 a 

3 
^!3 

Eh -2 
03 O 

3 O 

3 U 

=3 ^ 
i-s o> 

.. o3 

o 



M 

a 
o 

K 

a 

a 



2 Q 

o _ 

+> 3 

s § 

2 c 

O o3 



c3 q 
- 3 



03 l>. 

a22 



35 S3 

b2 bfl 

S 3 

■«" I 



X> O 



•IJ 


> 


e8 


o 


m 


v< 


a 




o 


42 


+d 




sa 


8 


> 


a 


la 


-i 


OJ 


Hj 


-O 




o 


a 


S 


2 


03 


3 


a 


^ 




a, 
o 



O CD 

-Q > 

^ '35 

3 ^ 
O cj 

M .2 

3 oo" 

Is 

CJ) 

.2 >; 

2 .5 

o3 f^ 
oT co 






No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



157 






00 



J- 

e 
g 

en 

e 

co 
S 

o 

r-o 

3 



CO 
V. 

CJS 

e 






*s2 






o 

n 
< 





o 


© 


o 


© 


© 


§ 


© 


© 


© 


§ 


© 


© 


© 


© 




o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


t^ 


o 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 






























e 


O0 


CM 


r~ 


CO 


no 


CO 


"5 


t>T 


© 


CM 


© 




© 


no 


o> 


"5 


© 


© 


CO 


CO 


t~ 


CO 


oo 




O0 


^ 


© 


00 


CM 


<rt 


"*1 


© 


CD 


■* 


© 


t^ 


CO 




oo 


eo 


in 

CM 


© 


1— 1 


t>- 




o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 




o 


© 


© 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


O 


© 


© 


© 


(O 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 






























e 


CM 


t^ 


© 


© 


CO 


■<*. 


oo 




t>. 


© 


© 


■** 


eo 


eo 


en 


CO 


CM 


CO 


© 


CO 


00 


CM 


© 


r~ 


eo 


■<*< 


© 


■* 




^ 




© 


00 


r-l 
CM 


i« 


rH 


t^ 


"3 


CM 


ta 


t- 


t^ 


© 


CO 




o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 




o 


O 


© 


© 


s 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


IA 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 






























e 


to 


CM 


■>*. 


t^ 


"0 


CM 


US 




00 


t-- 


CM 


00 


CO 


-H 


o> 


SO 


U0 


© 


r- 1 


•^ 


■<». 


© 


CM 


CM 


© 


rj. 




CM 


-*x 


»H 


°1 


■* 


© 

CO 


CO 


■* 


ITS 


CO 


CO 


CM 


eo 


■>* 


© 


© 


ia 




o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 




o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


^ 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 






























o 
o 


© 


t>- 


oo 


■* 


00 


CM 


t*. 


k« 


■* 


t~ 


CO 


© 


id 


eo 


lO 


CM 


© 


oo 


© 


© 


© 


m 


© 


"* 


-* 


•># 


CM 




vH 


CO 


© 


© 

CO 


© 

CM 


rH 


t^ 


Ttl 


eo 


■* 


eo 


eo 


"*" 


© 

r-l 


■«* 




© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 




© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


eo 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


O 


© 






























e 


io 


CO 


CO 


00 


© 




Tj< 


->*i 


U0 


© 


■* 


-* 


lO 


© 


en 


CO 


CO 


CN 


CO 


© 


CO 


CM 


t^ 


t~ 


00 


CO 


>o 


oo 


CM 


tH 


cm 

1-H 


CN 


"^1 
CO* 


CM 
CM 


tO 


CM 


© 


■* 


eo 


© 


CO 


© 


CM 


© 




© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 




© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


e«i 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 






























e 


CO 




cm 


© 




© 


CM 


t»- 




© 


HO 


00 


O0 


*H 


en 


t~ 


© 


© 


tO 


CO 




© 


© 


-«ti 


lO 


CO 


<* 


-* 


t^ 


tH 


CO 


■* 


© 

CO 


CN 


© 


■«*. 


CM 


CM 


CM 


© 


© 


CO 


CM 


"* 




© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


.© 




© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


O 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


«H 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 






























© 


© 


© 


00 


© 


© 


to 


t^ 


CM 


© 


t>. 


t^ 


■* 


t^ 


CO 


en 




lO 




OO 


CM 


oo 


t^ 




CM 


■* 




eo 


© 


t~ 


1-1 


io 


CO 


CN 


© 
->* 


CM 


© 


•*. 


i© 


CO 


© 


w 


CM 

eo 


«5 


to 




© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 




© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 






























e 


- CO 


•**. 


CM 


© 


CM 


O0 


J>- 


^- 


»-» 


CM 


iO 


© 


■<*! 


t>- 


en 


© 


tO 


CM 


00 


OO 


t-- 




© 


CM 


oo 


t^. 


t~ 


CO 


tr^ 


■H 


t~ 


© 


CO 


110 


CO 


"5 


CM 




r-l 


CM 


oo 


HO 


CM 


eo 




© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


o 




o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


en 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 






























en 


CM 


© 


© 


© 


CM 


»H 


T*l 


CO 


© 


>« 


© 


© 




CM 


eo 


© 


© 


t» 


t~ 


© 


© 


to 


CO 


3 


■«*! 


eo 


i« 


iff! 


FH 


*-i 


© 


© 


t>- 


CO 


oo 


kO 


co 


CM 


CM 


•* 


eo 


© 


CO 




cm 


*■* 


c<r 


CO 


















"* 






© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 




© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


oo 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


'© 






























en 


CO 


"0 


00 


t- 


© 


00 


CO 


l« 


© 


s 


© 






eo 


eo 


© 


CO 


O0 


CN 


© 


CM 


eo 


CM 


tr^ 


ir^ 


© 


lO 




i-i 


tO 


© 


© 


© 


CO 


00 


eo 


CO 


© 


in 


r-( 


© 


lO 


© 


































1-1 


T-H 


eo 


CM 


1-1 






'"■' 




.^ 


CM 


CM 


'"' 


r-i 




© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 




© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


t^ 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


O 


© 


© 


© 






























en 


© 




© 


CM 


CO 




CM 


CD 


© 


eo 


CO 


U0 


CO 


© 


oo 


© 


CO 


© 


CO 


CO 


CO 


■<*< 


© 


00 


■* 


oo 


l> 


U0 


00 


▼4 


t~ 


© 


t*. 


© 


r-l 




-cH 


oo 


eo 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


00 








CM 


* H 


+* 


*■* 


T ~ l 








•"■ 


CM 


'" H 
































on 






























+=> 






























C 






























O 






























s 






























X 
































w 




























CD 


H 




























+3 


g 




























OO 

o 


o 




























h 


3 


















<-T 




(h 




bC 


cp" 
cm 




c3 

=5 

a 


03 

a) 




< 


>> 


CI 


"3 

>-3 


m 
3 

< 


s 

-t-9 

a 

CD 


<D 

o 

o 

O 


CP 

a 

CO 

> 

o 

55 


CD 

s 

Cv> 

u 

CP 

Q 


a 
u 

CP 

> 

< 


S3 

t- 
C0 

> 

< 



m 



158 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



O 

O 






00 



v. 



e 

^ 









<» 

-< 






O 

- 

n 
< 



.2 »- ^ 






8 









8 


s 


O 






O 

O 


8 


8 


8 


s 


1 


- £2 























O 

















































t-» 


00 


OS 


CO 





CO 


00 


CO 


OS 




CO 


CM 


t>- 




00 


-* 


CO 





Ol 


CO 


<M 




00 







CO 


CM 


J2 o» 


cm 


CO 


«5 


^H 


CM 


t>. 


** 


•«f 


eo 


"* 


t>. 




O 


«o 


sss 


•* 


»H 


CM 


CM 


*^" 














•"« 


~ 









O 
O 


O 
O 


O 
O 


O 
O 


O 
O 




8 


O 
O 






8 










8 


8 


Qai 




O 


O 


O 


O 


O 


O 




















































co 


CO 


CM 


O0 


t^ 


OS 


s 


OS 


•^ 


»o 


CO 


OS 


•a»< 





00 




!>• 


CO 




(M 


O 


00 


iO 




00 


CO 


CM 




CO 





■^1 

oT 


<* 


CO 


CM 


CM 


CO 




»o 


. ec 


CO 


00 


CO 




8 














O 


O 

















8 



















O 


O 




















«o 

















O 


O 



















































^* 


lO 


CO 







t^ 


-*< 


CO 


•<*< 


-* 










>o 


CM 


Ok 


?-H 




OS 








IO 


O0 


00 


OS 


■^< 


CM 







CO 


^ 


eo 


00 


00 


CO 


CO 


O 


O 


CM 


CM 




eo 


•^ 


CM 


■^ 




•^ 


""* 


* H 


CO 


•* l 


CM 


*"* 












pH 





















O 


O 


O 


O 











8 






















O 


O 


O 


O 














IA 

















O 


O 


O 


O 













































tH 


CM 




CM 


CO 


>o 


O0 


CO 


t>. 


O0 


t^ 


oc 


CS 


CM 


CO 


Ol 


CO 


CO 


t~ 


CN1 


»o 


(M 


00 


Ui 


IO 


00 


OS 


10 


•<*< 


CO 


»H 


O 

of 


°i 


lO 


OS 


»t< 


CM 





cO_ 




eo 


■«* 


CO 


OS 


CO 










O 





O 


O 








O 











O 













O 





O 


O 








O 











O 





«# 








O 





O 


O 








O 











O 

































*H 







t~ 


CO 


c?> 


t^. 


C5 




CM 


CO 




CM 


•* 


00 


o> 


OS 


00 


CO 


OS 


OS 




CM 


CO 




CO 




t^ 


CO 





»H 


OS 


- 


CO 


10 

CM 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CM 


1 




<M 


eo 


OS 


CM 







8 





8 











O 


O 





O 


O 





O 



















O 


O 





O 








O 


eo 























O 


O 





O 








O 






























*H 


"* 


t^. 


CO 


CO 


00 





OS 


O 


OS 


oc 


O 


10 


OS 


00 


0) 




CO 


CO 


00 


CO 


00 




CO 




t>. 


CO 


>o 


l>. 


i-H 


»H 


■* 


00 


cm 

CM 




CM 





CM 






CM 


CO 


O 


OS 


00 


eo 













8 





O 


8 





O 





O 


O 






















O 





O 





O 


O 








a 

















O 








O 





O 


O 







































t~ 


1-H 




t~ 




»o 


>o 


OS 


«o 


CM 


CO 




O 


er> 


00 


CM 


CO 


00 


OS 


CO 


CO 


CM 


O0 


-*l 


■«*< 


OS 


OS 


*— 1 


*H 


t>. 


Ci 


00 
<m 


CM 
CM 


t^ 


CO 




i-"l 






"# 


r>. 


00 


CM 













O 


O 








O 


O 





O 








O 













O 


O 








O 


O 





O 








O 


lH 











O 


O 








O 


O 





O 








O 






























*-« 


eo 


10 


OS 


CO 






t~ 


O0 




00 


Ui 


t-» 


<M 


t~ 


o> 


t~ 


CM 


CO 


OS 


CO 


to 


*ez 


00 


00 


1-H 


CO 


CO 


00 


CM 


»H 


t* 


CO 


CO 


CO 


■<*< 


CO 








t^ 








CO 


CO 




O 


O 











































O 






































O 


O 


O 


































































»-4 


CO 


US 





-tfl 


00 


■*f 


CM 


CO 


»o 


00 


•«tl 




00 




Ol 


if 


->* 


-* 


CO 





CM 


CO 


oc 


■«*» 


CO 


«o 


OS 


<M 





*H 


00 


00 


CO 

of 





CO 


00 










eo 


eo 


00 


CM 















8 










8 










8 



O 


8 




8. 




8 


2 































O 




































cm 


CO 


OS 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CO 


CO 


oc 





CO 


t^ 


00 





o» 


as 


tr> 


<M 


CM 


T—i 


CO 


eo 


OS 





OS 


CO 


CO 




t^ 


»■* 


»o 


»o 
cm 


CM 


■"I 

CM 


CM 

i—< 


CO 


CM 




CM 




eo 


»o 


OS 


CM 












O 


O 





O 


8 







O 





Q 


O 












O 


O 





O 













O 


O 


00 










O 


O 





O 
















O 


O 






























s 


00 


CO 


CM 


os 


»o 


CO 


O 


CO 


00 


00 


>o 


r~ 


b- 


00 


eo 


CO 


OS 


CO 







CM 


■<!»< 


00 


>o 


CM 


00 


3 


CO 


^ 


t~ 


t"~ 


y—< 


Ol 


-* 


■**« 


CM 


•««< 






»■* 


eo 


CM 




w* 


^< 


CM 


*"* 


•^ 
















































aT 






























JS 






























■u 






























a 





























































£ 






























.2 


i 




























01 
.2 































"C 


a 


















i-~ 




Ih 






73 
tsfl 




>> 


<- 










g 


_ 


6 

a. 


c 


<u 

^2 


at 

— 


eS 

h 


0) 




la 

oJ 

a 

a 

»-9 


2 

c 

£i 

V 


- 


a 
< 


a] 


Ci 

c 

•-9 




3 


<v 

.a 


O 


s 

> 



e 

P 


> 

< 


> 

<1 



<v 




A 




-* 




C-J 


11 







S 




> 





S 


a 


p 


00 



s s 



O. fl 



is a 

M O 

i.S .2 
o a c 

« o « 



"S » ^ 

* CO CO 

T3 § as 

O ,— 1 i— t 

"o 



•: - u 



s 



33 a) 

a a 



- •— <o 

O 10 t"- 

-^ OS OS 

a rt ^ 

^ 3 3 

S3 2 OS 

~ ~ - 

. 1) C 

C ft — 



2-8 

■Oft j 

« a "*. 

OJ 

* 82 

.2 33 a 
*> a . 

"S « "S 

eo ea 

03 o 

-a c ^ 

Ph — co 



a -. 

© OS 
C5 »■* 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



159 






CO 



C3 






Si 



o 1 



00 

6 

H 

- 
< 





o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


§ 


© 


§ 


o 






o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


s 




IA 


o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


©_ 


© 


© 




































00 


»ffl 


•**> 


CM 


Hi 


© 


© 


CM 


© 






t>r 


•* 








eo 


CO 


m 


t- 




CO 


CM 


© 


-* 1 


CM 




t>- 


t- 


© 


© 




*^ 


°1 


CO 


"2. 


OO 


CO 


■f 




CM 




CO 


- 


- 


© 


eo 






o 


o 


8 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 






o 


o 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 




s 

oo 


© 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


































hi 


cm 


o 


eo" 


© 


CO 


•>*i 


r~ 


•^< 


CO 


Hi 


Hi 


cT 


© 




© 


•**• 


00 


Hi 






CM 


Hi 


->3> 


oo 


t>- 


CM 


CM 


© 




© 


00 


l>-^ 


00 


© 


n< 


CM 


CM 






^* 


© 


*~ 


CM 








esT 


eo 


of 


,H 
















~~ 








o 


o 


o 


© 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


§ 


© 


© 


o 


© 






o 


a 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


o 


© 




C» 


o 


o 


o 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


































oo 


to 


CO 




© 


t^. 


© 


Hi 


© 




© 


Hi 


•"* 




»o 




oo 


CO 


CO 




Hi 


co 


© 


^* 


t^ 


© 


oc 


© 


© 




■<*< 




▼H 


eo 


© 


© 


CO 


© 


CO 










CM 




l« 








o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 






o 


© 


a 


© 


© 


© 


© 




© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 




cm" 


o 


o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


































eo 




CO 


© 


t~ 


CM 


© 


CO 


Hi 


t^ 




© 


Hi 


CM 






oo 


■<*• 


o 


CO 


© 


© 


CM 


00 


Hi 


© 


© 


© 




© 






y* 


°1 


cm 


OO 

cm 


oe 


CM 


U3 






CO 


CM , 


CM 


CO 


00 


CM 






o 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 






© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


O 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 




tH 


o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


































oo 


US 


o 


■«*« 


© 


Hi 


00 


© 


oc 


t>- 


© 


Hi 


»e 




©" 




00 




->»< 


o 


•^< 


O 




t^ 


•>* 


© 


OC 


© 


t^ 


t^ 


CO 




*HI 


•* 


Hi 


© 


Hi 


© 


- 


CM 








CO 


t^ 


© 


eo 






o 


© 


o 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 






o 


o 


o 


o 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 




e 


o 


o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


































00 


© 


*-- 


-ce 


© 


•<i< 


Hi 


CO 


© 


© 


CM 


Hi 


Hi 


00 


eo 




oo 


<M 


00 


r- 


CO 




t>- 


t^ 




oo 


© 


© 


t~ 


t-- 


■"*« 




*"H 


- 


l>-^ 


CO 


~ 


Hi 












CM 




Hi 








o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 






o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 




a 


o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


































e- 


o 




o 


CO 


■*f 




t>. 


Hi 






© 


CO 


•<* 


© 




00 


a 




CO 










© 


■«»• 




© 


© 


© 


co 




1-1 


t^ 


t~- 


CO 

or 


eo" 


- 


-* 




CO 






CM 


•<*< 


00 


CM 






o 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 






o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 




© 




00 


o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


































E: 


o 


Hi 


r— 




•"* 


© 


cc 


© 




CO 


CO 


r^ 


CM 


CM 




S2 




© 


o 


CM 


© 


© 
Hi 


CM 


t~ 


CO 




© 


t~ 


Hi 


CO 




»H 


O0 


•* 


Hi 


© 






-* 




10 


© 




■* 


o 




































ym * 


cm 


CO 


, " H 


^ 












^ - 


eo 


1 "" 1 








© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 






o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


• © 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 




l» 


o 


o 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


































t» 


oo 


© 


-<*< 


-* 


VM 


t- 


CM 




© 




OO 


© 


■* 


CM 




oo 


Hi 


■»*< 




© 


© 


© 


© 


CM 


© 


CO 




© 




© 




v4 


© 


— 


OO 


CO 

cm 


CO 


H) 


CM 


«H 




© 


■"l 


CM 


CM 


Hi 






o 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 






o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 




(0 


o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


































B~ 


eo 


oo 


Hi 


CM 


00 


CM 


CO 


Hi 


•**! 


•^1 


oc 


CO 


Hi 


3 




O0 


3 


o 


CO 


© 


CO 


CM 


00 


© 


ao 


eo 


oc 


Hi 


CO 




iH 


CO 


•<*< 


CM 




CM 




•**< 




CM 


© 


•*r 




CO 








































'""' 


^ 


CO 














"■* 




""* 








o 


© 


o 


8 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 






o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 




■a 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


































00 


eo 


© 


-*#« 


© 


oo 


© 






t^ 


© 


CM 


«*■ 


CM 


■t^" 




o 


© 


© 


-«J> 


O0 


t^ 


CM 


© 


© 


•"C* 


© 


oo 


t^ 


t^ 




^ 




^1 


© 


© 

CO 


!■* 


oo 


CO 


CO 


CM 


© 


CO 


Hi 


© 


Hi 
































CD 
































X 
































43 
































C 
































o 
































s 
































X 




































H 




























a: 




'z. 




























BO 

* 




c 




























C 




§ 


























<jT 








£ 


>> 
















u 


— 


— 


bC 
c3 


bC 

el 
u 
09 






C 
>-> 


3 

c 

'- 


- 
ej 


- 


>> 

a 


a 

3 

>-3 


*3 


3 
e4 
3 
< 


s 

a 

- 

72 


co 

.a 
o 

«J 
O 


s 

> 

o 


s 

5 
a 

P 


> 


> 
< 





160 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



T3 



CO 






«S2 



O" 



00 

6 

H 
« 

H 



ta 


o 
o 
© 


g 

© 


g 

© 


© 


g 

© 


© 
© 
© 


© 
© 
© 


© 


© 

8 


© 

g 


g 

© 


8 

© 


© 
© 
© 


© 
© 
© 


A 
eo 

t4 


■^ 


© 


»o 


T* 


© 


OS 


*n 


i>r 


00 


CM 


OS 


t^r 


oT 


"* 


00 


t— 


CO 


© 


CO 


© 


© 


tA 


O0 


© 


cS 


«o 






© 


CO 


O0 


**I 


eo 


CO 






eo 


>o 


© 


S 


eo 




"" ' 


cm 


eo 


** 


















"^ 






o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 




o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


kA 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


0> 

oo 






























** 




© 


"S 


CO 


■* 




Oi 


OS 


OS 


i>T 


CM 


CM 


© 


CO 


■«*i 






CO 


t-~ 


CO 


CM 


oo 


t>- 


i^ 


OO 


»o 


CO 


o 


"3 


Tf 


«5 


CO 




CM 


CM 




eo 


t~ 


t^ 


^-l 


"<»< 


































"■* 




(M 


e» 












1-H 


CM 


^ H 


"^ 






o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 




o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


*# 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


da 

eo 

1-4 






























eo 




oo 


© 


© 


© 




© 


© 


-*l 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


OS 


CO 


■^ 


-* 


1-H 


© 


© 


lO 


t~ 


CO 




t» 


"5 


© 


© 


CM 


CO 


oo 


•* 


»— • 


CM 




CO 


oo 


t~ 


l-» 


CO 








cm 


•"• 
























o 


© 


© 


© 


g 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


g 


© 


© 




o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


eo 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


OS 

eo 






























-* 


CM 


U5 


>J0 


CO 


© 


00 




00 


CM 


OS 


CO 


t-- 


I-- 


eo 


-* 


■*n 


CM 


O0 


■«* 


no 


OO 


© 


CNI 




© 


eo 


CO 


■<*< 


»*0 


CM 


*-» 


oo 


T*< 


1— 1 


i-H 


1-* 


CM 


CO 


l^ 


© 


CM 






M 


CO 


cm 


oT 
















,H 






© 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 




o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


04 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


en 
eo 






























o 


CO 


lO 




© 


00 


•>*< 


© 


© 


© 


r^ 


"5 




t>T 


t^ 


•>* 


i« 


b- 


"0 


CM 




OO 


CM 


CM 


OS 


00 


oo 


CM 


O0 


© 


OS 


qo 


°1 


■<# 


CM 


CM 


CM 


*- 1 


CO 


■«*l 


t~ 


CO 




rt 




'"■' 




" H 






















o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 




o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


vH 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


en 
eo 






























00 


CO 


CO 


t^ 


CO 


CO 


© 


CO 


CO 


© 


lO 


■xj!" 


iO 


OS 




oo 


in 


© 


oo 




■<tl 


CO 


© 




© 


->* 




CO 




© 


"t. 


** 


CO 


»o 


■* 


i—l 


*— * 


CM 


CM 


eo 


«o 


eo 


CM 




CO 


CO 


** 


cm 


















1-1 






© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 




o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


e 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


en 
eo 






























"># 


© 


CO 


lO 


© 


00 


1^ 


CM 


t^ 


CM 


«5 


eo 


lO 


l^ 


i<0 


CM 


"CH 


t^ 


CO 


CO 


© 


CO 


■o 


t^- 




OS 


O0 


■* 




CM 


iO 


© 


00 


CO 


"5 




^H 


■* 


CM 


CM 


© 


CM 


Ir^ 


































*"* 


*" ' 


CO 


rH 


'-' 










CM 


""' 




1"H 






o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 




o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


en 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 
































eo 


CM 


CO 


OO 


© 


© 


CO 


■**< 


CM 


CO 


© 






CO 


->ti 


eo 


00 


© 


CO 




00 


lO 


CO 


CO 


CM 


CO 


■* 


-en 


00 


■»*< 




r~- 




CO 


"*1 


00 


© 


© 


Tf< 


O0 


CM 


© 


CM 


eo 


© 


































CM 


"™ ' 


* H 


*"* 








'"" ' 




'"" ' 


"" H 


CM 


'""' 






o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 




© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


©> 


© 


© 


© 


00 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


eo 
eo 






























CO 


© 


00 


lO 


cm 




r~ 


o> 


>J0 


© 


OO 


CO 


t^ 


eo 


uo 


*o 


eo 


->*l 


CO 


CM 




t~ 


iO 


© 


lO 


«*l 


© 


no 


© 


© 


CM 


© 


© 


■^ 


i— i 


eo 




© 


t^. 


© 


© 


© 


































»— 1 


1— 1 


CO 


cm 


y— I 








1—1 


y ~ ' 


CM 


eo 


"""' 






o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 




o 


© 


o 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


t- 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


00 
00 






























© 


© 


O0 


© 


OS 


eo 


«5 


■*»< 




© 


© 


eo 


xfi 


■"f 


00 


CM 


© 


CM 


© 










OS 


CO 


T* 


US 


CO 


»J0 


00 


oo 


© 


© 


■* 




CN 




*-H 


eo 


© 




CM 


































CM 


<N 


CM 


CM 


*■* 
















*^ 






© 


© 


© 


§ 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 




© 


© 


© 


© 




o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 




© 


© 


© 


© 


IP 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 




© 


© 


© 


© 


s 

v4 


































© 


t^ 


© 


CO 


© 


-* 


t^ 


© 


eo 


© 


t^ 


CO 


© 


© 


m 


x*< 


CM 


© 


i—l 


© 




•xf 


t-~ 


CM 


O0 


CM 


"<* 


CO 


© 


© 


t^ 


CM 








^H 


© 


© 


© 


CM 


































*" ' 


•^ 


CM 


, " H 
















'""' 


y-t 
































co 






























JS 






























■** 






























a 






























o 






























£ 






























M 
































g 








' 




















m 






























CO 

.2 


O 




























c 


S 


















C 




tT 




b£ 


T3 . 




>> 

89 

3 
a 

a 

•-a 


1- 
03 
3 

a 


a 


a 


>> 

c3 


a 

3 


13 


<J. 
3 
eX 
3 
< 


<x> 

B 

ft 

a> 


o 
o 
O 


a> 

6 

o 
> 

o 


O 
XJ 

S 

8 
Q 


CS 
ID 


S3 

O 

> 

-< 



Xo. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



161 



o 

O 

O 






>-1 



J- 

C3 
3 

en 



eo 
S 
o 

I— »s 

e 












00 

6 

H 

m 

<! 

H 





1 o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 






o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 




t>^ 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


































o 
en 




•**< 


CC 


t^ 


OO 




© 


•>* 






oo 


CM 


© 






no 


CM 


no 


© 


oo 


CO 




© 


■* 


■<* 


© 


CO 




t>- 




*H 


co^ 


CO 


CO 


CO 


00 


!>. 




T 


*a 


t^ 


© 


© 

CM 


© 


-<*< 






o 


O 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


a 






o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 




CO 


o 


o 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


































o 


00 




© 


© 


© 


t^ 


O0 


© 


CS 




CO 


© 


© 






o> 


CM 


•>*< 


© 


-* 


no 


© 


© 


O0 


f-H 


© 


00 


no 


OP 


■»*« 




*H 


- 


o 


CM 


© 

— 


© 


t^ 


eo 






eo 


1* 


CO 


oo 


eo 






© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 






© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 




IA 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 




































o 


© 


o 


1^ 


CO 


t- 


t^ 


t^ 


-<J" 


CO 


oo 


© 


t^ 


no 


eo 




o> 




CO 


© 


■^< 


© 


CO 


t-- 


1— 1 


-*l 


KO 


r-» 


OO 


© 


© 




^ 


■«* 


eo 


""1 

cm 


CO 


CM 


■«*« 






CM 

.—1 




CM 


00 


t~ 


T* 






© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 






o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 




*dl 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 




































o 


t- 


CM 


© 


■># 


no 


© 


CM 


© 


1-^ 




© 


© 




OO 




o 


i>- 


OO 


© 


© 


■<*< 




CO 


t-~ 


© 


© 


O0 


© 


CO 


CM 




*-< 


"># 


00 


© 
cm 


CM 

CO 


t~- 


1< 






CO 




CM 


CM 


© 


CM 






o 


o 


© 


o 


© 


© 


O 


o 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 






© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 




e*> 


o 


o 


© 


© 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


































o 
oa 


CO 


© 


Ttl 




— 


t~ 


iO 


l-» 


© 


CM 


CO 


CM 


© 


OO 




eo 


t*» 


no 


CO 


no 


00 


■* 


© 


CO 


© 


CO 


00 


OS 


OO 




t> 


CM 


■^ 


CM 


eo 


C5 


■»*• 


eo 




•<# 


CO 


»o 




CO 






































*"" ' 


05 


eo 


CM 




""" ' 














'-' 








o 


© 


© 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 






o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 




C4 


o 


o 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 




o 
oa 
































eo 


Tt< 


© 


no 


CO 


CO 


CO 


*r> 


OO 


CO 


■^ 


© 


© 






o 


t-- 


© 


O0 


-* 


© 


CS 


CO 


r^ 


© 


-<*< 


t^ 


■"f 


t^ 




t^ 


CO 




oo 


t~ 


eo 








>o 


■<*• 


t» 




CM 






































1—1 


"™ ' 


-CM 


*"" 
















'"' 


^"* 








o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 






o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


CS 




«H 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 




O 
































t^- 


o 


no 


■* 


•* 


eo 


CO 


■>*i 


ta 


CM 


•^ 


no 


CM 


»o 




eo 


© 


i« 


© 


no 


O 


© 


CM 


© 




t~. 


©i 


■* 


■^1 




■<* 


CO 


t~ 


CM 


© 


t^ 


eo 


•* 


eo 


-<*< 


-* 


CO 


CO 


-* 










































CM 


>* 


CM 














CM 


,mi 








o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 






o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 




e 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 




e 
o 
































■«* 


© 


•^ 


© 


CM 


CO 


oo 


->*l 


UO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CM 


■^ 




© 


© 


HO 


no 








CO 


CO 


oo 


CO 


© 


OO 


© 




t^ 


oo 


CO 


eo 


CO 


eo 


1 


1 






CO 


© 


© 










































eo 


eo 


,- ' 


*— ' 














1 ~ ' 


'- ' 








o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 






o 


© 


© 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 




0a 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 




oa 

00 
































oo 




no 






CO 


© 


UO 


-<f 


UO 


•**< 


© 


CO 


eo 




oo 


oo 


© 


CM 


v-4 


CO 




CO 


© 




© 


CM 


t^ 


cs 




e» 


CO 


CM 


U0 


LO 






1 




1-H 


eo 


CM 


© 








cm 


rt 


-* 


CM 








1 


















o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 






o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 




eo 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 




ea 

00 
































oo 


OJ. 


-<*l 


© 


CO 


© 




r^ 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


t^. 




CO 


CM 


© 


CM 


•>*< 


CO 


eo 


© 


CD 


CO 


oo 


© 


no 


t~- 




CO 


© 


CO 


00 


CM 


iO 


CM 




CO 




© 


t^ 


"^1 


t^ 






































*" H 


CO 


CM 


'"' 


,_l 






"" ' 




""" ' 


1—1 


1-1 


* H 








o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 






o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 




t- 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 




en 

oo 
































no 


^ 


»o 


no 


in 


CM 


OO 




CM 


•>f 


© 


-* 1 




■^ 




-* 


CO 


CO 






CO 


HO 


© 


00 


© 


© 


O0 


CS 


CO 




00 


© 


no 


no 


© 


© 


CO 


u0 


*-H 




© 


no 


CS 


no 








*"• 


CM 


** 
















,H 




































tc 
































ji 
































■•a 
































3 
































O 
































s 
































X 




































w 




























DO 




H 




























-*a 




g 




























01 

9 




o 
































a 
























































o 


O 






















tT 




fcT 




t£ 


bj 






>> 

u 

3 

d 

S3 
>-o 


3 
u 

P=4 


"o 
H 

rt 

£ 


- 
< 


>> 

C3 


o 

C 

3 


*3 


y. 
3 
tx 
3 
< 


o 

£1 

i 

- 
o 


fcT 

Xi 

o 

o 
O 


o 

s 

O 
> 

o 


£1 

s 

o 
o 

o 

Q 


C3 

o 
> 

< 


s 

(- 
5 
> 

< 





162 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



o 

f— < 
o 

a 

o 









oh 



Si. 
O 

r>«3, 

5 



^3 



=55 



- c>3 



00 

6 

< 



for 
ars, 
.917. 


© 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


o 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 
































«* 


lO 


© 


t-~ 


CO 


oo 




CO 


CO 


CO 


00 


us 


© 


t^ 


t-» 


lO 


cs 


oo 


t>. 


© 


OO 


-**< 






CM 


■*& 


00 


t-» 


- .S ** 




co 


© 


© 


© 


Tj. 




CM 


CM 


"<tl 


t^. 


OS 


© 


CO 


gwoo 


.— » 


.—1 


CM 


— ' 


- 1 






















o 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 




o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


<o 


t^ 


© 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 






























*■* 


o 


us 


© 


us 


© 


•* 


CO 


CM 


oo 


CM 


00 


© 


© 


t^. 


O) 




lO 


o 


© 


t^ 


-*tl 


•*J< 


© 


"3 


OO 


CO 


O0 


us 


CO 


T-* 


lO 


t>. 


<M 

cm 


■^1 


•* 


© 




CM 




■^ 


-<*l 


CO 


t- 


CM 




o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 




o 


© 


o 


© 


o 


© 


© 


O 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


<o 


© 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 






























*H 


CM 


CO 


o 


t^ 


© 


OO 


us 


OO 


CO 


us 


© 


ITS 


** 


CO 


Ok 


*# 


US 


CM 


CO 


CO 


OS 


00 


t~ 


CM 


1 






© 


oo 


»H 


© 


CO 


oo 


© 

CO 


■^ 




US 






1 


.— 1 


CO 


© 


»-i 




o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 




o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


IA 


o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 






























.H 


© 


o 


CO 


© 


»o 




no 


oo 


OO 






oo 


© 


© 


0) 


CM 


t-- 


© 


© 


»o 


© 


•»f 


CO 


co 


CO 


CO 


© 




oo 


tM 


CC 


OO 

1-H 


to 


US 


CM 




© 


1— 1 




CM 


CM 


00 


t>. 


■<*< 




o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 




o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


^< 


o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 






























iH 


00 


CT5 


© 


CO 


© 


us 


!>. 


CO 


in 


o> 


t^ 


© 


CM 


© 


en 


© 


o 


CM 


US 


US 




© 


US 


CO 


US 


© 


US 


t~ 


CM 


iH 


© 


© 


o 

CO 


CO 

of 


"2. 








T 


1 




CM 


t^ 






o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 




© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


eo 


© 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 






























»-t 




-*l 


o 


<M 


t-» 


© 


CM 


•* 


oo 


■* 


© 


CM 


CO 


© 


a> 


"■* 


lO 


OS 


CO 


© 


■^1 


© 


US 


oo 


oo 


00 


CO 


CO 


OO 


vl 


o 


t^ 


© 

CM 


CM 

of 


oo 




1 


1 




■* 


■<*! 


t~ 


t^ 


1—1 




© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 




© 


o 


o 


<o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


ei 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 






























»-t 


oo 


t«- 


CM 


US 


t- 


00 


t^ 


© 


oo 


•"* 


US 


T* 


© 


CO 


0> 


CM 


© 


© 


CO 


■<*! 


-* 


t^ 


CM 


CM 




CD 


en 


t>- 


CM 


■wt 


t^ 


T-H 


© 

CO 


CM 

cm" 


■* 


.—1 


1 


1 


1 


7 




-*< 


r-~ 






o 


o 


© 


© 


c^ 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 




o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


«H 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 






























*H 


OS 


o 


■^ 


© 


oo 


CO 


■^ 


© 


© 


CO 


CO 


00 


->* 




e> 




© 


-* 


CM 








CM 


t^ 


OS 


© 


© 




US 


»h 


us 


t~ 


.—1 




CO 


CM 


T 






CM 


us 


© 


"5 


T-l 




o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 




© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 






























«H 


o 


© 


-*l 


t^ 


b- 


© 


CM 


CO 


us 




© 




© 


OS 


0> 


0> 


•>*< 


us 


© 


t~- 




© 


t^ 




us 


t^. 


CM 


t>- 


CM 


*-l 


■* 


OO 


© 


© 


CN 


US 


T 


1 




1 


TT. 


CM 


US 






o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 




o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


at 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 






























o 


<M 


CO 


•"*l 




"<f 


© 




US 


© 


y* 


CM 


CO 


US 


© 


e> 


© 


oo 


CO 


CM 


o 


CO 


CM 


■** 


M< 


US 


oo 


© 


<M 


-<*i 


*H 


eo 


CM 
CM 


r>- 


t-^ 


© 


CM 


y— 1 
1 


1 




1 




<M 


CO 






o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


§ 


© 


© 


© 




o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


eo 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 






























o 


»o 


to 


l^ 


t^- 


CO 


•«*< 


•*tl 


CM 


CM 


t^. 


.— i 


© 


■<!< 


■>* 


en 


<M 


CO 


US 




# 


C5 


»— 1 


© 


oo 


•* 


t^ 


CO 


© 


■<*< 


vH 


OS 


US 


<M 

CM 


- 


© 




1 




1 






y—l 


© 
































CO 






























^3 






























-*> 






























a 






























o 






























a 






























.a 






























CO 
CO 


fe 




























.2 


O 




























'u 




























oT 


of 




>, 


1- 














t-T 

J2 

a 

■*? 

ft 

o 


^r 


o 


^2 


c3 
M 

o 


C3 
h 




i- 
c3 

a 

c3 

1-9 


03 

2 

o 


S3 


p. 

< 


>> 


- 


•-s 


4* 

CO 

3 
< 


0) 

O 

o 

O 


a 

1 


a 

s 

Q 

P 


> 

< 


> 
< 



is 






^3 


zl. 


O 




> 


^ 


Xi 




m 


H 




a 








3 




ec 




O 
■*3 




OS 






on 


qn 


fl) 


a 




SS 


3 




a 


5 



3 2 



00 


eo 
ft 


S 


a 




s 


CO 


O 

CO 







Tl 


CO 




- 


09 


hi 


CO 






09 


,3 






+3 


i- 








d 


3 






-*< 


CO 


o 




d 


oo 


eg 


fl 




o 




eo 






o 


3 


ft 


th 
3 




,0 




o 




? 


+3 




3 




01 


..- 


T3 




^) 


u 


Cj 


>» 




I4H 

c 


CO 


eo 

+3 


c3 




c 

o 


C3S 

CO 


_3 

-d 


3 

CO 

'-3 




o 


oo 


T3 


e9 

ft 

co 




© 


d 


d 


c3 




^-h 


•^ 


""■. 







+3 


+3 
O 

3 

eo 
H 

a 


>> 




n 


d 

o 


CO 

3 
O 


'3 


+3 


CD 


> 


> 


a 


P 




eo 


o 


3 

o 

£ 










-* 


o 


ft 


CO 


CO 





(h 


p^ 






O 




ci 


© 


+3 


+J 


01 


t^ 


09 


eo 


o 


o 


oo 


CO 


on 


CI 






o 


3 


B] 


.9 

d 

CO 


eo 


■3 


33 


H 


•+3 

09 


+3 

3 

03 


eg 
09 




— 


-f3 


CD 


+J 


u 




eo 


r3 


C3 

It 


CO 

ft 


-d 

CD 


+3 

c3 
3 


4J 

a 

n 


ci; 


c-j 






m 




CO 

O 

+3 


O 

> 

o 
S 


e8 

CO 
CO 

CO 


3) 

> 


M 


-c 


eo 


CO 


o 


'c 

> 


3 
O 




CD 


u 


CD 
CO 




© 


CO 


o 




OO 


+3 


h 


^ 


>— 1 


C3 
It 




u 


u 


(-. 


99 


CO 


3 


c3 
co 


t^H 


_= 


01 

03 


•: 


>s 


u 


-*j 




eo 


CD 
CD 


ri 


O 


Tl 


X 






3 


+3 


+J 


CO 


"S 




o 

43 
+3 


3 
o3 


3 
XJ 


d 

o 


ft 

i 


3 
co 

3 


■J 
C 


CO 




o3 


C 
eo 


eo 
M 


CO 




CO 

o 


3 


a 


09 


- 







s 





CO 

m 


CO 


+3 






03 


T3 


3 


!>i 


CO 


h 




eo 


5 
CO 


T3 


a 

eo 

_> 
"S 

G 
<1> 


co 


a 

3 
| 

es 

a 


a> 

^5 


co 
og 
eg 




(J 
O 

o 




eo 




h 


in 





u 

.2 


a 


co 


+3 


OS 


a 

+3 


H 
i 


_s 


CO 


+3 

a 

CO 




s 

o 
a 
13 


i 

w 

H 


31 


H 




O 


u 

3 






Tl 








— 


eo 




rt 




3 


J 




3 




39 


7J 







No. 57.]. 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



163 






J* 



.e ~. 



cq 



a 

> 
o 



•2 & 






05 

cc 



C5 

6 

n 

<i 





"£*s 


c3 0> 


eo 


CO 


CO 


CO 


Ui 


■* 


00 


•* 


© 


■* 


l-H 


© 


© 
i 




© 0, tj-S 


© 


00 


•>* 


© 


© 


t^ 


O0 


CM 


CM 


CO 


CO 


l-H 


i>- 




OlllflO 


CO 


■* 


© 


-# 


© 


"# 


eo 


i-l 




l-H 


"* 


CO 


i* 




Per 

ag< 

Rai 

colle 








l-H 






















c3 © 5 
3 ©.3 


■<*< 


CO 


OS 


»o 


© 


<M 


l-H 


CM 


■<* 


© 


© 


-* 


i^ 




cm 


t*. 


© 


CO 


Ui 


CM 


r~ 


Ui 


■^ 


© 


•* 


© 


© 




CM 


■* 


H* 


»o 


CO 


'-' 


•* 


ui 


l-H 


© 


Ui 


CO 


^ i 




.3 © o 


l-H 


T-l 


•<* 


CM 


<M 


CM 


© 


© 


O 


© 


© 


© 


l-H 




Pngti 






























3| 


r^ 


ui 


i— 1 


© 


OS 


t~ 


CM 


© 


© 


CO 


Ui 


l-H 


© 




CO 


© 


CM 


CO 


CO 


■>* 


CM 


-* 


CM 


© 


CM 


CO 


^ 1 




^•g 


CO 


CO 


■* 


l-H 


CO 


•* 


l-H 


■<*< 


l-H 


© 


l-H 


CM 


tr- ' 




•m C5 


























CO 




=1 






























Ph~ 






























"3 „J 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


O 


1 © 




CD O) 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


<=> 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 




>*«« « 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 
































TH 


CO 


OS 


t-T 




© 


00 




^ 


l-H 


CO 


Ui 


CO 




— o *H 


OO 


^ 




© 


t~ 


l-H 


o 


CO 


OS 


CO 


MH 


CO 


CM 




*3 © 


CO 


t^ 


© 


OO 


CO 


00 


t^ 


CO 


© 


CO 


© 


CO 


t^ 
































■S o3 


■>* 


© 


oT 


OS 


CO 


CO 


OO 


CO 


OS 


© 


■* 


CM 


© 






t~ 


OS 


CO 


>o 


-# 


CO 


CM 


CO 




CO 


CO 


-<*< 


OS 








cm 


1—1 


l-H 


l-H 






















© 


© 




1 


1 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


1 © 








o 


© 








© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


o 


CS 


© 








o 


© 








© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 






09 
































33 




Ui 








t^ 


■* 


l-H 


© 


© 


t- 


CO 


l-H 






o 


CO 


t-» 








CO 


OS 


OS 


OS 


© 


i— i 


i-H 


-* 




M 


HH 


© 


t- 








OS 


© 


t^ 




© 


■** 


t~ 


© 






































CM 


eo 








eo 


•* 


CO 


OS 


<* 


CO 


i— 1 


"* 






CO 












CO 


CO 


OS 


H* 


l-H 


l>- 






•« 
































« 




























































O 
































H 




1 


1 


© 


© 


© 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


I 


| 


1 1 




OQ 


.9 






© 
© 


© 
© 


© 
© 


























c£ 


© 


00 






















'c3 






CM 


CO 


t^ 






















O 






CO 
CO 


tjh" 

CO 


CM 

OS 
Ui . 


















h 










<M 






















A 




























































« 


H 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


1 O 


ft-C +» 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


H 


M M* m 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


h 


03 3 O $ 


■* 


© 


© 


t>r 


© 


© 


© 


Ui 


i>r 


© 


© 


i>T 


© 


in 

o 


t^ 


"5 


OS 


CO 


© 


© 


© 


CO 


CO 


© 


o 


t^ 


CO 


© S ojO 


O0 


oo 


O0 


OS 


© 

l-H 


© 


© 

l-H 


OS 


© 


© 


OS 


oo 


OS 


(J 


+> 




























»J 






























O 






























.2 a 






























© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


1 © 




Wasted in 
River 
below Da; 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 




© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


©^ 


© 


o 
































OS 


OS 


OO 


t^ 


l-H 


t^ 


t^ 


CO 


t>r 


CM 


© 


CO 


CO 




CM 


CM 


Ui 


o 


Ui 




© 


CM 


© 


-* 


CO 




OS 




t~- 


C©^ 


OS 


l-H 


l-H 


-<* 


l-H 


CM 


l-H 


°i 


""*i 


>o 


"i 




co 


eo 


cm 


eo 


CM 

l-H 


OS 

eo 


■"dJ" 


rf 


-* 


■«* 


-* 


-* 


t>r 


charged 
into 
chusett 
ueduct. 1 


o 


© 


© 


© 


O 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


1 © 




© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


o 


© 


o 


© 


cs 


© 


© 




© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 




<N 


c£ 


CO 


© 


i>T 


CO 


ui 


l-H 


CO 


oi" 


© 


Ui 


l-H 




CO 


CO 


1— 1 


"^? 


OS 


OS 


-* 


CO 


ui 


CM 


© 


Ui 


CM 




O 


© 


Ui 


CO 


•* 


CO 


co 


CM 


l-H 


© 




CO 


































g 03 o< 


CO 


OS 


CO 


(M 


© 


t^ 


oo 


CM 


CO 


CO 


Ui 


oo 


© 




Q ^<1 


© 

1—1 


OS 


CM 


00 


OO 


© 

l-H 


© 


l-H 
l-H 


© 

l-H 


OS 


■<* 


© 

i-H 


© 




ived 
City 
cester 
shed. 


, 


! 


© 
© 


© 
© 


© 
© 


© 
© 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 © 

© 








© 


© 
1>T 


© 

Ui 


o 

CO 














o 

CO 




Rece 

from 

of Wor 

Water 






t-~ 


CO 


Ui 


CO 














CO 








CO 
OS 


l-H 
l-H 


Ui 


© 
© 














oo 

CO 










i-H 




















































« 


























cS 




trl 






























a 


























>» 




o 


























u 




a 


























o 






• 


FH 
S3 

3 

03 
i-s 


03 


(■) 

ja 

CD 


o 
M 
03 


"u 

< 


>> 

03 


05 



3 
•-a 




-4" 

m 

a 


< 


u 

a 

HJ 

ft 

o 


tS 

O 
+s 

o 

o 


u 

Si 

a 

> 

o 


u 

a 

a 

0> 

a 

o 

Q 


Total, 
Average 



>4H 


o 


O 


> 


>> 




ft 




ft 


f- 


3 


, 1 


m 


T0 




a 


+J 


T3 


'-H 


C 


O 


lH 
















Tl 


O 


CO 


ft 


3 





a 


-rt 


a 

o 




C3 


tn 








G 


O 

i> 

-- 


w! 


o 








Ph 


at 


+-> 


Ti 


CJ 




00 


0) 


3 


ft X 



is _fi 



r^ 


Q 






T— 1 




CC 


© 


'J 


« 


-S 




s 


h 




bfl 


c 


to 



164 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 






< 




s 


r^ 


•c-^ 




cs 


99 


(^ 









"W 




K 


X 


C3 


oo 


CO 


B 

o 
u 




f- 


**■* 


o 


Tl 




c3 


CQ 


^ 






9 



Bs 



CQ 






CQ 



dq a 



o °° 










i 

go c 


1 

o a> 


© 


to 


© 


to 

© 


CO 


CM 


00 
CO 


© 

to 


CD 
CD 


CM 

tO 


CO 


CM 


OO 






P-i >«" 


CM 


■* 


t--. 


© 


to 


■«* 










to 


CM 


CO 








© 


O 


© 


to 


CM 


CM 


CD 


,_, 


© 


© 


t^ 


00 


CO 






o 




<* 


CM 


CO 


© 


t>. 


© 


© 


CO 


to 


t^. 


to 






© 
© 




© 

CO 


CM 


CO 
CM 


OO 
^-1 


© 
© 


CO 

© 


© 


oo 
© 


© 


CD 
© 


to ' 






"** 
































i 


o 


oo 


CO 


^ 


CO 


CO 


^ 


© 


CM 


to 


y- 1 


_ 


,_, 








IO 


CO 


© 


■«* 


© 


CM 


r-H 


-<tl 


»o 


© 


CO 


00 


to 






































'o3_ 9J 


CC 


CM 


■n< 


CM 


-<*< 


"«* 


i-l 


© 


r-l 


to 


v-l 


CM 








tf 3« 


























-«tf 








o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


1 © 






-H O i . 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


G> 


© 


© 






© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 








© 


•^ 


,_r 


C3 


^ 


CO 


© 


© 


© 


CM 


© 


co" 


IO 






CM 


tf5 


O0 


to 


oo 


© 






to 


to 


t^- 


© 








CO 


t^ 


© 


CO 


Ci 


-* 


CM 


CM 


CO 


CM 


© 


CO 


>* 




































00 


CO 


CO 


to 


© 


00 


CO 


to 


■^h" 


CO 


CM 


oo 


CO 






CO 


ta 


CO 


© 




t^ 








CO 


CO 


CM 


to 












"* 


*"* 


""• 
























o 


1 


© 


1 


1 


1 


© 


1 


© 


1 


© 


© 


1 © 










o 




© 








© 




© 




© 


© 


© 










o 




© 








© 




© 




© 


© 


© 








en 


































CO 


© 




■* 








CO 




CO 




© 


© 


© 








o 


cm 




© 












CO 




to 




CO 






H 

< 


h5 


00 




IO 








CM 




© 




CO 


•«* 


CM 








cm 




CM 












to 




to 


CO 














' H 








i—l 








to 










« 
O 




































1 


o 


1 


© 


o 


© 


1 


o 


1 


© 


1 


1 


1 1 






H 






o 




© 


© 


© 




© 




© 












OQ 


a 




© 




© 


© 


© 




© 




© 


















































CO 




© 


l-H 


l~~ 




oo 




© 














'S 




© 




© 


t^ 


© 




to 




CO 



















-*< 




to 


CM 


CO 








-* 


















































© 




to 

CM 


I-. 


t^r 




l>- 




© 












o £ 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


l S 






>^S on 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 






© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 






© 


© 


© 


© 


CO 


i>r 


CM 


*>r 


CO 


■<* 


•nT 


co" 


m<" 








CO 


CO 


00 


© 


■<*! 


tO 


oo 




t^. 


to 




© 






t- 


"0 


CO 


© 


to 


© 


© 


!>;_ 


© 


*— t 


CO 


CM 


t^ 






tO 


in 


CO 


© 


i>r 


CM 


CD 


»o 


t>r 


OO 


© 


•* 


r^" 






cm 


CM 


© 


CD 


00 


CO 








. '-' 


CO 


CM 


CO 




< 

Q 


£tf 






























i CT3 co 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


1 © 




200)1- 


© 


© 


©1 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


O 


© 




o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 






>-<'* H t £ o 






























« 


CM 


Tt< 


CO 


CO 


to 


© 




oo 


t~ 


CO 


CO 


OO 


C6 






CO 


IO 


CM 


© 


Tt* 


"0 


CO 


@ 


•* 


CM 


oo 


to 






CO 


© 


CO 


!>-_ 


CD 


CD 


l>- 


oo 


00 


oo 


© 


y-t 




































o 
































►J 

< 


! 






























% S * • 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


O 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


1 © 




O 


o 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 




00 "2 m co 

»h 03i> fe 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 






00 


t>r 


CO 


t>T 


CM 


© 


^J 


CO 


CO 


to 


CO 


«* 


© 






IO 


iO 


CO 


CO 


•«** 


Ci 


t^ 


CM 


© 


tO 


CO 


© 


CD 






0> k« _, O 


© 




© 


oo 


O0 


OO 


© 


CM 


CM 








© 






.-H 


^r 




























*>a 






























T3 *»' 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


1 © 






© ?Sfo3 
03 2 O « » 

^3 <i 


o 


© 


© 


o 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 






© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 






IO 




t-^" 


CO 


■>* 


CO 




© 


i>r 


t>r 


i>r 


CO 


© 






■^1 


CM 


t^ 


to 


© 


t^. 


O0 




© 


t^. 


CO 


CM 


l>. 






IO 


© 


© 


00 


to 


"^1 


© 


© 


CO 


CM 


CO 


CO 


© 






IO 


CO 


c^" 




CM 


IO 


CO 


t^" 


© 


CO 


CO 


CO 


N 






"0 


>o 


to 


to 


to 


to 


-* 


•"*< 


■<f 


to 


to 


to 


tO 






T3 .. -ts 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


1 © 






Ojl >>o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 








o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 




































CO 


CM 


00 


© 


00 


CO 


© 


OO 


CO 


tO 


© 


CM 


eo 








l>- 


■** 


t^ 


© 


© 


CO 


to 


tO 


CO 




CM 


to 






00 

o 


•<* 
»o 


© 

CO 


1-H 








oo 


© 

CO 


oo 


oq 
© 


to 
to 








CD 


© 


«o 


■^ 


■* 


-*l 


CO 


CO 


to 


to 


■* 


© 


to 






-ti". 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


1 9 






-Is 11 

.4J r* S-< P f* 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 






o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 




































o 


CM 


O0 


CO 


CM 


r~ 


oo 


© 


© 




r>- 


t^ 


CO 






tf'S O^ J- 


o 


oo 


■«* 


00 


•<*< 


CO 


l— 


CO 


© 


00 


tO 


© 


CO 






o> 


oo 


CO 


-* 


CO 


CM 


■* 


© 


o 


-* 


© 


•^ 


CO 




































»-" <o a qj 


CM 


oo 


CD 


CM 


© 


t>- 


oo 


CM 


CO 


00 


^f 


oo 


© 






* £tf 


o 


© 


CM 


OO 


OO 


© 


© 


v-l 


© 


© 


><*< 


© 


oo 
















^ 


""* 


*"" 


y—* 






** 








hrt 


























t-t 

>» 






i 

o 




a 

a 


>> 

L 

S3 

e 

5 

P4 




< 


>> 


a 


•"9 


m 

tXi 
< 


a) 

a 

CD 

a 

o 


cu 

x> 
o 

o 

o 


<v 

B 

> 
o 


o 

i 

a 

0) 

Q 


<-> 
"-S o 
03 «« 

t > 



-a 



3 



^3 
O 



3 



o3 
-3 



a 

3 



£ ® 
Z « 



3 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



165 






(^ 
Si 

CO 
C5i 

o 



S ~ 



o 



60 



CO 

CO 

?=> 



o 



o 
< 



^ © 







go. 


-T3 
3 © 


©5 
© 


OO 


"* 


CO 




»© 

CO 


CO 

© 


00 
c© 


© 

CO 


OO 


t^ 


© 
•^1 


© 
1 

© 






O O — =N 

O 03,g~ 
P* Png 


CM 


•>* 


t^ 


00 


I© 


-* 


CO 








t^ 


^ 


CO 






ZZtS^ 
































c3 ® £ 


OO 


© 


r~ 


CM 


CM 


O0 


*-H 


C3 


c© 


OO 


CM 


© 








OO 


CM 


»o 


CM 


>o 


OO 


CO 


CO 






©5 




l» 






.£ © « 


o 


.— 1 


CO 


CM 


CM 


^ 


© 


© 


© 


,_, 


© 


1-^ 


1 

CO 






o3I=! fl 


























*H 






« 8 a. 
































3? 
.a-s 


00 




CM 


t~ 


©> 


CO 


CM 


© 


r^ 


CO 


OO 


© 


© 






CM 


O0 


OO 


CO 


OO 


CO 


© 


t- 


i>- 


CO 


CM 


t~ 


© 






CO 


CM 


■* 


CM 


-* 


-«*< 


1—1 


I© 


y-< 


CO 


r-( 


CM 


rH 






=i a 


























■<tl 






tf^ 
































2 -d 

© (1) 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


1 © 






o 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 






o 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 






































CM 


t^ 


CO 


CO 


© 


CM 


© 


t^ 


-<f 


© 


© 


co 






r 3°ffl 

C3 *i 


00 


CO 


00 


© 


CM 


© 


-<*! 


© 


© 


t^ 


-^fl 




© 






c© 


© 


""1 


1© 


oc 


*~i 


© 


GO 


co 


CO 


CO 


r~ 


© 






"S «3 


00 


■«* 


»© 


CM 


-<f 


© 


CO 


CO 






© 




•* 






S £ 






CO 


CM 


CM 


























o 


© 


© 


1 


1 


1 


© 


1 


© 


1 


© 


© 


1 © 










© 


© 


© 








© 




c© 




© 


© 


© 










© 


© 


© 








© 




© 




© 


© 


© 








OQ 


































0Q 


1© 


■* 


OO 








»© 




CO 




CO 


I© 


© 








o 


CO 




»© 








UO 




CO 




OC 


I© 


© 








"*i 


CM 


•f 












•* 




-<*l 




«>. 








|H 
































H 




CM 


CM 


L- 












CO 




O0 


© 








O 


































< 


































« 
































































o 


































H 




1 


1 


1 


© 


© 


© 


1 


© 


1 


© 


1 


1 


1 I 






to 










© 
© 


© 
© 


© 
© 




© 
© 




© 
© 










(x* 




.9 








© 


o> 


CO 




CM 




i>r 










< 




*e3 








^ 




^< 




CM 




© 










P 




o 








lr~ 


»© 


CO 




CM_ 




O0 




















CM 


»— 1 






i-* 




CM 










« 












T-H 






















^ 


































Ph 

oo 
































































fc 


+= M-t 


o 


© 


© 


O 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


1 © 




o 


n o3 o . 


o 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 






© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 




©T3 -ij © 

-^ a ©r^ 

o3 +j'"2 c3 


CO 


,-T 


© 


© 


■* 


-* 




CO 


CO 


•"S*" 


© 


•* 


OO 




• < 




CM 






00 


CO 


CO 


CM 


Tf 


CO 


1© 


© 


© 




O 


CO 

© 




©r 


CM_ 

00 


I© 


CO 

CO 


1© 

CM 


CM 


CO 


CO 
O0 


t-T 


CO 


CO 






£0 






CO 




CM 














CM 








i Bt3 oq" 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


1 © 






2 Ofl) h 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


CD 


C5 


© 


© 


.© 


© 


© 


© 






T3 (hJ q) 
**" £ £ © 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 




































CM 


i© 


©s 


CO 


© 


CO 


CO 


© 


t» 


CO 


CO 




CO 






ffi-tf fe ©-J3 


CO 


CM 


CM 


■*f 


CM 




CO 


© 


CM 




t~ 


t~ 


CO 






«© 


1© 


^ 


CO 


!>-_ 


»© 


CO 


■<* 


CO 


"<*< 


CO 


■* 


00 
















1— t 




















*g*£ 
































© Xi Is © 

© f-r SP 3,2 
o3 3 o-a © 

!^ © _c © u. 
.23 O 5? 
T3 O^ 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


© 


© 


1 


1 


1 


1 © 




















© 
O 
CM 
© 


© 

© 

CO 

© 

CO 








© 
© 

CO 






M 
































H 
































g 
































O 


























^ 






a 


























© 
>> 

o 
u 










t- 
c3 
3 
C 
c3 
Hi 


u 

es 
3 
h 

© 
EM 


o 
o3 


c 

< 


>> 

c3 


© 

c 

3 


*3 

•-s 


OQ 

3 
M 
3 
«< 


© 

s 

© 

- 

© 

02 


t-T 
© 

o 
© 

o 


© 

.a 

s 

© 
> 
o 

55 


© 

a 

© 
© 

© 

p 


M 

— c3 

■p © 

o > 

h < 



166 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



it 

O in 
ci co 



■73,dco 



^H l-H O 



00 00 CO 00 



-«5 



C35 

•<s> 
do 






O 



cq 

© 

<3 



o 

C10 

CO 






2 



&q 



1— I 

6 

m 
-< 
H 



_3 CO 



5 s" 



0.3 
•*> o 
o > 
•1 »-• 
,is co 

O CO 

0,2 



in . 
•d-C© 

CO t. O 

" PQ co 



E 1 



-1 

~ 03 
3 CO 



. co . 

rdT3t^ 
CO (_ OS 

HHpQcM 






1— 1 


CO 


O 


O 


os 


O 


CO 





OS 


os 


»H 


CO 


s 


s 


CO 


CM 


w 


s 


«o 


-* 


m 


•* 


"* 


•** 


CO 





O 














© 





© 





CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


OS 


t~ 





y~i 


t^ 


CO 




CO 




t>- 


-* 


00 


CM 


-* 


*a 


OS 


'-' 


OS 


*-' 


CO 


■<* 


CO 


»o 


OS 


00 


ta 


CO 


CO 


CO 


00 


CO 





OS 


os 


OS 


OS 


OS 


CO 


t~ 


»o 


HO 


10 


10 


IO 


»o 


"5 


no 


ia 


10 


»o 


m 


»o 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 



^•3 



'« 



^3 13 co 

CO I* CM 

S5cm 
wpqcM 



CM CM CM CM 



_, CO • 

co i_ 10 

c3 oj co 



_2 c3 t^ 
rv ON 



. CO • 

^d^CM 
gj cjgs 

HHpQrH 



IO -H rH 



81 



n 



,d CM 
M II- 



+S'rt 

o d 



M II 



m 



N 


OS 


OS 


OS 


CO 


00 





OS 


OS 


t-- 


OS 


00 


00 


OS 


OS 


OS 


OS 


OS 


OS 





OS 


OS 


OS 


OS 


OS 


OS 


1—1 


OS 


eo 








■* 


CO 


U5 


CM 


OS 





>o 


»o 


"<rl 


CO 


10 


OS 


OS 





eo 


CO 


'- H 


OS 


CO 


OS 





<M 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CO 


CM 


«M 


CO 


CM 


CO 


CM 


CM 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


co 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


co 


CO 



£-3 

>- d 
ce o 



,drH 

M II 



00 





^H 


CO 


CM 


eo 


CO 


OS 


CO 


Ui 


£~ 


CO 


t^ 


10 


00 


00 

10 


00 

id 


CO 




co 
10 


00 


10 


10 


tr- 
ies 




10 


10 



•si 
3a 



o 






3 

d— • 



o 

— o 



,S >>J 






ed 



<3 



d J 
d d 



bJD 

d 



/j 



> 6 

O CO 

^ p 



a 

03 
Ha 



Xo. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



167 



Table Xo. 13. — Sources from which and Periods during which Water has been 

drawn for the Supply of the Metropolitan Water District. 

From Wachusett Reservoir into the Wachusett Aqueduct. 

















Number of 

Days during 

which 

Water was 

flowing. 


Actual Time. 


Million 

Gallons 
drawn. 


.UU.MH. 


• Hours. Minutes. 


January, 














26 


258 


45 


3,194.9 


February, 














23 


218 


25 


2,773.1 


March., . 














25 


223 


5 


822.0 


April, 














24 


220 


12 


2,479.2 


May, 














26 


232 


11 


2,681.4 


June, 














27 


272 


55 


3,221.8 


July, 














25 


233 


57 


3,368.0 


August, . 














27 


274 


49 


3,480.1 


September, 














24 


220 


10 


3,094.6 


October, 














26 


243 


37 


3,057.5 


November, 














23 


200 


48 


1,353.0 


December, 














26 


250 


50 


3.368.3 


Totals, 


302 


2,S52 


44 


32. $93. 9 



Total actual time, 118.86 days. 

Total quantity drawn, 32,893,930,000 gallons. 



From Sudbury Reservoir through the Weston Aqueduct to Weston Reservoir. 




Total actual time, 185.80 days. 

Total quantity drawn, 19,008,800,000 gallons. 



168 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Table No. 13 — Concluded. 

From Framingham Reservoir No. 3 through the Sudbury Aqueduct to Chestnut Hill Reservoir. 



Month. 


Number of 

Days during 

which 

Water was 

flowing. 


Actual Time 
(Hours). 


Million 
Gallons 
drawn. 


January, 


















31 


734.5 


1,885.3 


February, 


















28 


672 


1,833.2 


March, . 


















31 


744 


1,644.5 


April, 


















30 


720 


1,415.1 


May, 


















31 


744 


1,471.5 


June, 


















30 


720 


1,423.9 


July, 


















31 


744 


2,090.6 


August, . 


















31 


744 


2,010.6 


September, 


















30 


720 


1,591.6 


October, 


















31 


744 


1,607.8 


November, 


















30 


720 


1,417.2 


December, 


















31 


744 


1,885.5 


Totals, 


365 


8,750.5 


20,276.8 



Total actual time, 364.60. 

Total quantity drawn, 20,276,800,000 gallons. 



Table No. 14. 



Average Daily Quantity of Water flowing through Aqueducts 
in 1917 by Months. 1 



Month. 


Wachusett 
Aqueduct 

into 
Sudbury 
Reservoir 
(Gallons). 


Weston 

Aqueduct 

into 

Metropolitan 

District 

(Gallons). 


Sudbury 
Aqueduct 
into 
Chestnut Hill 
Reservoir 
(Gallons). 


Cochituate 

Aqueduct 

into 

Chestnut Hill 

Reservoir 

(Gallons). 


January, 


102,906,000 


55,545,000 


60,816,000 


- 


February, 












98,882,000 


53,021,000 


65,472,000 


- 


March, 












26,348,000 


52,977,000 


53,048,000 


- 


April, . 












82,483,000 


51,853,000 


47,170,000 


- 


May, . 












86,342,000 


52,594,000 


47,468,000 


- 


June, . 












107,237,000 


55,473,000 


47,463,000 


- 


July, . 












108,478,000 


46,681,000 


67,439,000 


- 


August, 












112,090,000 


47,616,000 


64,858,000 


1,042,000 


September, 










103,000,000 


49,397,000 


53,053,000 


3,103,000 


October, 










98,481,000 


53,277,000 


51,865,000 


- 


November, . 










44,957,000 


53,337,000 


47,240,000 


- 


December, . 










108,497,000 


53,323,000 


60,822,000 


- 


Average, 


89,963,000 


52,079,000 


55,553,000 


344,000 



1 Not including quantities wasted while cleaning and repairing aqueducts. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



169 



2s. 

© 



HO 



© 

"© 

HO 

GQ 
©i 

§s 

Oh 



HO 

CO 

o 



©■ 



co 

©3 



© 

"<o 

HO 

e 

©^ 

O 



HO 



CO 
HO 

© 
HO 



T— I 

6 

Hi 

m 
< 


















O 








O 


O 


O 











1 





•^uguigo'BjdsiQ; jgSunjj 














O 




CD 






CD 
O 


O 
CD 







CD 

CD 

















jo sis'eg no 'Suidumj ui 
pasii p30Q jo spunoj OOI 




OS 
CO 




OS 
CO 




CO 

CO 


O 

CO 

00 


O 

-tf! 
OS 




CO 


O 
O 
Ui 


O 
OS 


O 

CD 

T— 1 


O 
CM 

CO 




CM 

CO 










jgd spunod-^oo^ ui ApQ 


OS 


CO 






CO 


OS 




CO 


CO 
CO 


co 

CO 


CO 
Ui 


Ui 


Ui 


OS 

"5 




co 
ui 




O 














CD 





O 











O 


1 


O 


•dijg joj p9.tt.ojp3 


<o 













CD 


CD 
CD 


CD 








CD 
CD 






CD 






CD 


CD 

O 




CD 
CD 


•q.H3Q J9j g 'Suiduinj ui 
pasn {boq jo sp'unoj 001 






OS 








CD 


CD 

CD 

C5 


O 

CO 




CO 
OS 




OS 


O 

Ui 

OS 


CD 

CD 

Ui 






00 

CD 


O 
OS 

co 




O 

00 


jad spunod-!jooj[ ui A^nQ 




Ui 


U3 
-<*• 


<M 

CO 


00 
10 


00 
Ui 


CO 


->* 

CO 


Ui 


1— 1 

Ui 


CM 


10 




Ui 


H 




CO 


O 


1^ 


CO 


Tt< 


^* 


»o 


_ 


CD 










Ui 


h3 • 




00 




CO 


OS 


00 


00 


CO 


CM 


OS 










*& 


: '2 -o^[ auiSug; 


CM 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


•<* 


CO 


CM 


1 


1 


1 


1 


CO 






CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 










CO 


H H 






























































































Kfe 






















■* 




O 




Ui 






















OS 


CO 


■* 




Ui 


> 


'I *°N atnSug; 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


1 


CO 


< 




















CO 


CO 


CO 


co 




CO 




















1— 1 


T-I 


1-1 


** 




1-1 


•dng joj 


<M 


t-. 


CO 


^* 


CO 


CO 


CO 


OS 


l-H 





**l 


CO 




OS 


p8Ai.O[p3 - ^U83 J9<J g 'Sui 


OS 


co 


»o 


00 


CO 


Ui 


CM 


CM 


CO 


Ui 


CO 


-*l 


1 


OS 


-dxnrijj ui pgsn p30Q jo 


CM 

CO 


OS 
CO 





CO 
CO 


CM 


00 

CM 


CO 


Ui 

OO 


CO 


CO 

CO 


CO 


CO 




OS 

00 


punoj jad paduind suoubq 


-* 


-* 


■* 


US 


Ui 


Ui 


Ui 


iO 


■* 


■* 


■*n 


Ui 




-# 




Ui 


OO 


t^ 


iO 


CM 


CO 


CO 


■* 


r- 1 


00 


OS 


00 




■<* 


*jmpn[0 


00 


00 








r_ 


-* 


"*l 


CO 


O0 


00 


Ui 


1-^ 




CO 


puB sgusy jo '^ugQ jg<j 









































CM 


O 











-* 


-* 


OS 


Ui 


■* 


1 




OS 


t- 


r^ 


-* 


CO 


Ui 


00 


"5 


CM 


t^ 




CO 


CO 




•(spunoj) 


co 


co 


t^ 





-* 


CO 


CO 


CM 


CO 


CO 


CD 


1—1 


"C* 




i a 3[ u 1 1 Q pue saqsy 


00 
CM 


1-- 


10 

CM 


1-- 


t~ 


CO 

CM 


CO 

CM 


O0 
CM 


CO 


OS 
CO 


OS 
CM 


Ui 


00 
CO 
CO 






I 


CV| 


00 


CO 


CM 





Ui 


t^ 


ui 





_ 


OS 


Ui 


1 






"* 


10 


"<*< 


CO 


CM 


00 


Ui 


t~ 


00 


-*i 


Ui 


CM 




•(spunoj) 




<M 


CO 


CO 


-<*< 


CO 


CD 


CM 


*"i 


*-i 


CM 


00 


t~ 




Suppreg ui pgsn \voq 




C35 


CM 


CM 


CO 
Ui 


CM 

CO 


CO 
CM 


CM 


00 

CM 


■* 


O 
CM 


Ui 
OS 


OS 






"5 


O 


>o 





Ui 





ui 


O 


O 


OS 


^ 


CO 


CO 


1 




CO 


(M 


CM 


■** 


CO 


1—1 


O 


t^. 


00 


00 


O 


CO 


■<f 




.•(spunOfj) Sui 


OS 


OO 


CM 


^tl 


CO 


CO 


10 


OS 


OS 


t^ 


00 


*"i 


10 




-dumj ui pamnsuoo reo^ 


CO 
CO 


OO 

CO 


Oi 
<M 
CM 





<M 




00 


10 


CM 

OO 


OS 


CO 


CM 

CO 


00 

Ui 


CO 



CM 









O 


i— 1 


t^ 


1—1 


OS 


CO 


OS 


CM 


t>- 


CO 


l?~ 


CM 




•(suon^o uoihtk) dug 


CO 


CM 


""* 


CM 


Ui 


CO 





O 


CO 


t^ 





CO 


O 


1 


JOJ p9MO|p3 ^U9Q J9J g 


CO 


«3 
CO 




CM 

CO 


CO 
Ui 


00 


OS 
00 


1^ 

O 


CO 
00 






r— 1 

00 


CO 




'padumd ^i^ubuq [t^oj, 


1H 































•(suoj 





O 


»-• 


1^ 


_ 


OS 


CO 


OS 


CO 








CO 




cm 


-1*0 uo nniv) (Jns 


CO 


CM 


"^ 


CM 


»o 


CO 








CO 


1 


1 


I 


CM 


1 




JOJ p9.tt.OJp3 - ^U9Q J9<J 


CO 
-*• 


CO 




CM 

CO 


CO 
Ui 


00 


OS 
00 





CM 

CO 








00 
CM 




6 
a 


g 'pgdumd ^I^UBTIQ 


*" H 














^ 










t^. 






do 


to 


O 


Ui 








Ui 





Ui 


1 


1 


I 


O 


1 


sz; 






CO 


O 


>— ' 


»o 





1—1 


y-< 


Ui 








CO 







•euiij, Suidumj jb^oj, 






























03 O 





<M 


00 


CO 


'Jt* 


CM 




00 


1 


1 




!—< 


1 


N 




I- CO 





O 


00 


»o 


CM 


*# 


O 


00 








l^ 






ffl^ 


CM 


CO 


1— I 


y—i 


CM 


CM 


CO 










CM 






■(sno[ 


















OS 


t^ 


CO 


t~ 


CS 




~ 


JOJ p9A\0Jp3 '^U9Q J9<J 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


CM 

Ui 


1^ 





CO 

00 


00 


1 





g 'pgduind ^i-jubiiq 


























CM 






G 1 




, 


1 


, 


1 




1 


Ui 





CD 


Ui 


O 


1 


fc 




















Ui 


CO 


IO 




CO 








3 































•9UIIX Suidumj p^ox 






























tc 1 


1 


1 


1 








1 


00 


Ui 


00 




"*l 


1 


N 




Fh 
















CO 




CM 


CO 








K 
















^ 


CM 


CM 


CM 


00 




W 

S3 

O 


>s 


£ 














CP 






^2 




15 




bC 

a 








C 
c3 
1-5 


p 

■8 


O 

u 

c3 


< 


>1 

- 


CJ 

C 
S3 
•-9 




co 

tx 
< 


e 

■4-5 
ft 
O 

CO 






■(-> 
u 




s 


> 



s 









> 

< 



170 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 






5- 

.© 



© 

©5 



o 

©> 



s 

o 

•<s> 

e 

o 



c 



o 

1— I 

6 

H 

n 
< 



•3upp{3r[ jo 
Sux^Bajj joj uoporipaQ 

O^j l^UaiuaOBpdSIQ 

jaSunjj jo sisBg no 
'l B °0 J° spuno j 001 -13d 
spunod-^ooj ui ^jtiq 


61,310,000 
47,570,000 


50,880,000 




•Sui 
-^qSi^I jo Suip^ajj joj 
uoi^onpaQ ou : dtjg joj 
pa.tt.oip? -%U3Q id j '*'* 
'P3oq jo gpunoj 001 J 9 d 
'spunod-^ooj[ ui A^riQ 


58,620,000 
45,480,000 


48,650,000 




'(^j) WI 98W9AV 


119.26 
115.61 


CO 

1 s 




•3ui^u3r[ jo Sui^aH 
j o j aoi^onpaQ o ^j 
!dijg joj'paitt.ojp3 -%ud£) 
J9J-^'l«oojopanoj 
jad paduind suojpsQ 


590.06 
472.21 


CO 
' d 

o 




•ja^uiio 
puB sausy jo ^uaQ ja<j 


10.0 

17.8 


C5 

1 « 

1— ( 




•(spunoj) 
j a 3f u i | q puB saqsy 


485 
2,700 


3,185 




•(spunoj) 
3ni3[nBg pui? Sui 
-dxnh^ ui pauinsuoo p30Q 


4,830 
15,184 


20,014 




•(suonBouonnK) ^is 

joj pa.tt.ojp3 •q.uaQ ja<j 
^•^ 'padumd ityriuimfr 


2.85 
7.17 


10.02 




•amix Suidumj p3^ox 


Hrs. Min. 
3 35 

10 30 






i 

o 


































: $ 1 - | i 

3 | £ £ £ § "3 .2 J* £ £ O 


Total, 
Average 





No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



171 



— a 



3 

^3 






e 

Oh 



I r: 

J § 



^ 






© 

s- 

Pi, 

o 



CO 

© 



O 

n 

< 



00 


•(suojrB£) noij 


^ 


eo 


i-l CO CO 


eo cm eo. 


N O O 


»o 




CO 


£•* 


-nw) d HS JO J 


OO 

co 


o 


eo t^ cm 
00 cz> t^ 


i-H !>. i-l 

CO CO IO 


CO O C<) 

r^ io co 


CO 
CO 




>* 
to 


o a 


paAvorfe ^.uaQ 


co 


o 


fH CM 1-1 


CM CM O 


CM CM eo 


eo 




o 


fa < 
fe eo 

°eM- 

S- 1 


ja<j g 'padumd 


CO 




eo 






CM 






1-H 


a" % i q. n b n q 
aSBJaAy A"nBQ 




















"(SUOJIBf) UOIJ 


CM 

i— 1 


CO 


»o *»■ i-t 

t^ cm m 


c» eo o 
eo o co 


CM t^ CO 

CO t^ CO 


Oi 

eo 


CO 




~ CO 

3 o 

C3^ 


-TIK) d HS JO J 


tr^ 


CO 


CO CM CO 




eo t^. ■* 


eo 


o 


1 


paM.OJJ'B 'JUgQ 

ja<j g 'padumd 


eo 

i-H 
1-H 


«o 
1—1 


CO CO IO 


t^ CO C5 
CM 


CO t» ~* 


o 


to 

CO 
CO 




02 


A^mjrio |^ox 




















■Sui^ijSi/j 
jo Supyeajj joj ubi^oiip 


o 
o 

o 


o 
o 
o 


o 


1 ' § 

o 


1 


1 8 

o 


o 
o 

o 


1 


o 
o 
o 


" 8 Q°N Jmaarao'eidsiQ 


o 

o 


o 

CO 


o 


o 




o 

CO 


o 

CM 




o 

CO 


jaSunjj jo stsreg uo 


eo 


CO 


CM 


T»< 




CO 


CM 




o 


'reoQ jo spunoj ooi »(J 


to 


>o 


UO 


o 




eo 


CO 




■<* 


spunod-^oo^ ui ^tiQ 




















•SuraqSji io Sm^ajj 


o 
o 


o 
o 


g ' ' 


1 ■ § 


1 


1 § 


o 
o 


1 


o 
o 


joj uoi^onpaQ o^j : dijg 

JOJ paALOJTB ^U83 JBjj g 

're°Q jo sptmoj ooi -iad 


o 
o 


o 
o 

e>T 


o 
o 

cm" 


o 
d 

CO 

eo 




o 

CO 
CM_ 

d 


o 
d 

CO 




o 
o 

o 


spunod-^oo^ u i A>nQ 


to 

1-H 


"5 

i— i 


i— i 


o 




CM 


CO 




■<f 




O 


>o 


IO 


CM 




_ 


^ 




CO 




cm 


o 




CO 




CO 


«o 




CO 


•(^aa^j) %}i r j aS^iaAy 


© 


^; 


o ' ! 


1 ' d 


1 


1 d 


CM 


1 


o 




CM 


<M 


CM 


CM 




CM 


CM 




CM 




i-H 


•i-H 


i—l 


i— I 




1-1 


rH 




1-H 


•Sui^qSi'j jo Sui^Bajj 


to 

o 


i-H 


■* 


t^ 




-* 






t^ 


joj uoiionpaQ o^ 
idtjg io j paM.oj]B ^ua3 


d 


CO 

^-1 


CM 


' ' d 

CM 


1 


' d 

CO 




1 


!>. 


jaj s 'fboq jo punoj 


1-H 


1—1 
















iad padrand suojjbq 






















■* 


CO 


o 


CO 




*_, 


»o 




CO 


uaspniO 


^H 


o 




' ' CM' 


1 


1 ^ 


t>- 


1 


CM 


putt saqsy jo ^uaQ jaj; 












1-H 










o 


O 


o 


1 I «o 


1 


1 >o 


o 


o 


1 




-*l 


CO 


CO 


CO 






o 


CO 




•(spunoj) 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 




CO 


o 

CO 


to 




jajjniTQ pue saqgy 


t^ 




CO 


CM 




CO 




to 

CM 






o 


o 


O I I 


1 I o 


1 


1 o 


o 


o 


1 




t^ 


co 


CM 


CO 






t~- 






•(eptmoj) 


eo 


eo 


CM 


t^ 




t^ 


•-* 


CO 




Suppreg; o^j 'Smdrcmj 


eo 


CO 

co 


CO 


CM 

CO 




»o 

C5 


t^ 


CM 

C5 




ui pauinsuoo I b o q 


CO 




IO 


1-H 




■<3, 




o> 






CNJ 


«s 


"o 


,_, 




o 


»o 


CM 




•(suon^o uo HTTTC) 


CO 


■^ 


d ' ' 




1 


CO 

1 ^ 


IO 


1-H 


1 


di[g joj paAVojjB q.uaQ 


Ci 


o 


CO 


CO 




CO 




CM 




Jaj g 'padumd a^ubuq 
















CM 






Co 


o 


O 1 I 


1 1 o 


1 


1 »o 


IO 


o 






'^° 


^ 


CM 


IO 




•<* 


1-H 


CM 




•aniix Suidranj jejoj, 






















CO"* 




eo | | 


1 1 eo 


1 


1 o 


eo 


CM 


1 




t- ^tl 


t-- 


IT- 


^ 














K^ 




CO 






-<*< 




CM 
























z 




















o 




















a 


















o 






3 

5 


>> 

It 

a 

3 
Eh 

fa 


March, 

April, 

May, 


June, 
July, 
August, . 


September 
October, . 
November 


o 

S 

o 
a 

o 

Q 


"3 
o 
H 


bfl 
S3 

(- 
o 

> 

< 



172 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



■*^> 

© 
© 



©> 
§: 

£« 



"So 
CD 

o 

'■©• 

to 



©i 



© 

no 

C3 
|* 



**o 

e 

-*o 



00 
1— I 

6 

n 
< 



jo Sni^Bajj joj' uoi% 
-anpaQ - o^j Iq.uauiao'ej'd 
-siq jaSunjj jo sis^g 
uo '\voq jo sptmoj 001 
jad spunod-'jooj ui A^riQ 



OO OO *-i 



•3uiq.Tp3ri jo Sni 
-}Bajj joj uorpripaQ o^ 
Idqg joj pa.siOjjB ^ua^ 
ja j z 'l^oo jo spunojoOI 
jad spanod-q.ooj; ui jtynQ 



a i-H h 









oo 


o> 


<M 


-* 


_ 


o 


00 


cm 


o 








-«*i 




'I -o^[ auiSug; 


CO 

eo 


CO 
CO 


CO 
CO 


"5 
CO 


OO 
CO 


«5 

CO 


00 
CO 


CO 
CO 


CO 

CO 


1 


1 


1 


1 "? 

CO 






CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 








CO 


h!^ 


























































H ft 






•<*! 


t»- 








CO 


»— 1 


o 


CO 


Cs 


o» 


CO 


'9 *°N anting; 


1 




CO 


1 


1 


1 


oo 


CM 


CM 


e<5 


CO 


o 


1 ^ 

CM 






CO 


CO 








CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


















o 


OS 


CO 


o> 


OO 


CO 


'9 "°N oniSng 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


CO 

eo 




cm 


1— 1 


CO 


1 <°. 

CO 




















CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


eo 


CO 



•3m^t[3rj jo 3ui 
-^Bajj joj uoporipaQ o^j 

idljg JOJ P8M.0JP3 '%UBQ 

J9J g 'psoo jo punoj 
j a d paduind suoubq 



•je^uno 
pwe sausy jo '%uqq ja<j 



•(spunoj) 
3ui3[u«q pui3 Suiduind 
ut paumsuoo p^oQ it^ox 



CM y- 1 *— I J-* i-l 



«-H O i-H 



CM CM i-H 



•(suoj 
-p3Q uoiflij^) paduind 
A^rjuBnQ' aS^jaAy A^ibq 



CM l-H »-H rH r-l 



CO OO Iti y- 1 
CM ,-( ,_| ^h 



•(snon^o uoinipj) d HS 
joj paMojp3 '^uaQ jaj 
2 'paduind ^i^ubiiq ps^ox 



•(SUO[ 

-I B D ttoniTK) dns 
joj paMO]p3 - ^uaQ ja<j 
Z 'padrund ^iq.uBnQ 



•araix Suiduinj p^^ox 



OO OO ^-c 



do 



y-l rl O 



w 



•(suo^ 

jojpaMO|p3 -^uaQjaj; 
g 'paduind A^uBriQ 



•auiix Suidinnj ps^ox 



' ~ 



3 i 



W 



*(SUO[ 

jojpaAvoqB ^aaQ jaj 
2 'padtnnd A^ji'ju'BriQ 



•auiix Suidumj p3^ox 



i i i 



i ^ 



a i 



i i i 
t i i 



o 



tT a> a. £ ^" c3 

b a - , . . * •§ h •§ I 3 s 



Xo. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



173 



2>- 



© 
e 

©> 

•<s> 



o 



^5 
© 






53 



O 



< 



•%m%Tjfii r i 


1 § 


© 

O 


o 
o 


eo 

o 


o 
o 


O 

o 


© 
© 


© 
© 


© 
© 


© 
© 


© 
© 


1 


© 
© 


jo Sui^eu joj uoponp 
-9Q °N ' ^uaxuao'BTdsiQ 


© 

o 

CO 


© 
© 


© 
© 


o 
o 


o 
o 

CM 


o 
o 

oo 


© 
© 

CO 


© 
© 

CM 


© 
© 

CO 


© 
© 

C5 


© 
© 




© 

CO 


jaSunjj jo sis^g no 


t^ 


© 


in 


<3> 


■* 


o 


CM 


CO 


^ 


CO 


ci" 




o 


'pjoQioepnnoj 00I-i 8d 


50 


-*l 


t>~ 


>o 


'iH 


»o 


■>*l 


CO 


r— 


-* 


CO 




IO 


spunod-^oo^ ui i^tiQ 






























I © 


© 


© 


o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


1 


© 


•3vli%v(Svj jo Suii/eajj 


o 

o 


o 
o 


o 

o 


CO 

o 


o 

o 


CO 

o 


© 
© 


© 
© 


© 
© 


© 
© 


© 
© 




© 
© 


jojuorpripaQO^j :dy[g 


o 


o 


o 


o 

CO 


o 


o 


© 

O 


© 


© 


© 


© 




© 


JOJ p8A\OJp3 -%U3^) J8J z 


00 




00 


CO 


o 


CO 


eo 


eo 


t- 


eo 


i-H 






'IBOQ 10 SpUTlOJ 001 J8d 


CO 

CO 


CO 




eo 


CM 

■^1 




«> 


© 

CO 


CO 


CO 


eo 






spunod-^ooj ux j?pq 






























O 


«3 


eo 


o> 


CM 


t^ 


IO 


CM 


t~ 


CO 


00 




© 




CM 


Tt< 


t~ 


»o 


CO 


-# 


eo 


00 


oo 


1-H 


T* 


. 


!>. 


•(^aaj) %iyi 8S^j8Ay 


1 ^ 

CM 


CM 


C5 


o 

CM 


o 

CM 


CM 


CM 


© 
CM 


© 
CM 


CM 


OO 
CM 




CM 


•SurpjSrj jo Sui 


CO 


o 


CM 


00 


t^ 


o 


lr^ 


© 


r~ 


© 


CO 




o> 


-^■Bajj joj uoi^onpaQ o^j 


CO 


m 


CO 


ta 


i-< 


»o 


© 


-* 


oo 


■<* 


CO 


1 


r~ 


idqg joi paAio^p3 *^n9Q 


CM 




CO 
CM 




t~ 


c» 


00 


eo 

C75 


ITS 

CO 


© 
© 


OO 




© 


J8J g 'T130Q JO pUtlOJ 


CO 


rfi 


t>. 


io 


M< 


->*l 


CO 


»« 












jad padrand suojibq 






























-* 


t^ 


IO 


t- 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


© 


© 


^ 




© 


•J85JUHO 


1 <m' 


l^ 


■** 


■* 


eo 


•<J< 


t~ 


oo 


© 


1-^ 


CM 

CM 




CD 
y~ 1 


puB ssqey io '(lnaQ jaj 






























1 m 


CO 


o 


lO 


©■ 


© 


© 


© 


CO 


© 


U3 


Tj< 


1 




CO 


OS 


t- 


CO 


OS 


© 


CM 


oo 




00 


Ci 


■>*1 




•(spunoj) 


IO 


© 


■"i 


CM 


t^ 


00 


OO 


oo 


<M 


00 


CO 


t^. 




i93[tiit 3 put? seusy 


CO 

CO 


•* 


C5 




CO 


o 


CM 


t-~ 


(M 
CM 


CM 


CM 

Oi 


© 

1-H 






1 »<3 


o 


o 


o 


o 


"5 


"3 


© 


»o 


"3 




eo 


1 


•(spunoj) 


CO 
CO 


oo 

CO 


^3 


o 


eo 


its 

CD 


CO 

© 


CM 


OO 
CM 


© 


© 


IO 




3nqn?g o^j 'Sui 


»o 


M< 


CO 


o 


o 


00 


CM 


CNI 


CO 


OO 


— 


CM 




-duind ut pamnsuoop30Q 


eo 


CO 


•*> 


CO 
CO 


o 


CO 


eo 




CM 

© 


CO 
CM 


00 


CM 
CO 






© 


CO 


CM 


>o 


o 


r^ 


t>. 


CO 


*-H 


^ 


CM 


^ H 




•(suon^o Honnn) 


© 


-># 


*-H 


CO 


CM 


© 


«>• 


eo 


eo 


CM 


t^ 


!>. 


1 


dljg JOJ p3AiOJp3 "Q-uaQ 


00 
CO 


CO 

CJ 




CO 


CM 


00 

1-- 


OO 


CO 
CM 


oo 

CO 


cm; 

CO 


© 


00 
CO 




j8<j z 'padumd ^iihbti^ 


00 




» 


CI 


C5 


© 


00 


© 


© 


eo 


- 


CO 
C3> 






3 1 o 


o 


C=) 


o 


o 


«« 


VJ3 


© 


m 


© 


© 


IO 


1 




3 * 


eo 


o 


o 


o 


CM 


■* 


© 


eo 


•>* 


© 


•>*l 




•stuij, Suidxunj jb^ox 




























X 1 -eH 


CO 


o 


■>* 


o 


© 


CM 


© 


eo 


CO 


"*< 


CO 


1 




— © 


t~ 


CM 


"* 


CM 


Tl* 


© 


CM 


-«*< 


-<*i 


■* 


-ct< 






M "3 

1— 1 




t^ 


t^ 


t~ 


t^ 


© 


t^ 


t^ 


CM 


t^ 


CD 
CO 




W 

H 

c 






























- >> 

>> b. 














o 


u 


J2 


o 


"S 


6 
M 
eS 

o 




u. e3 

53 » 

"-3 l*( 


H 

hi 


ft 
<5 


>> 


a 

3 

"-9 


•-3 


10 

3 

3 

<5 


y 

— 

a 
o 
02 


o 
o 
o 

O 


O 
> 

o 


s 

o 
u 

o 

Q 


o 
En 


> 



174 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 






HO 



c» 
S 

© 

© 
Si, 

HO 

e 

00 

© 

©i 

s 



© 
© 

J- 

O 



•*o 

© 



o 
6 

ffl 
< 



•3upu8in[ 
jo Sui^/eajj -ioi ubicpnp 

-8Q O^J lluaUiaOBjdSlQ 

jaSunjj jo sis^g; no 
'l B °0 J° spuno j 001 J3d 

Spunod-^OO^ UI ^TlQ 


88,180,000 
86,270,000 


86,410,000 


•Sui^uSri jo Surreaji 
joj uoi^oripaQ 0^;' : dug 
joj paMonB "^noQ jaj j; 
'Iboq jo spunoj 001 **<* 
spunod-^oo^j ui <tyriQ 


86,400,000 
84,530,000 


84,670,000 


•(^aaj) <jjtT[ a3Bj8Ay 


121.67 
120 96 



1 


•Sui^uSkj jo Sui 
-^■eajj joju'orjonpaQ ojsj 

SdlTg JOJ pakoip3 ^U8Q 

jaj z *I«°D jo P™o<£ 
jad paduind suoip3£) 


852.51 
838 95 


CS 
CO 
OO 


pus saqsy jo *:j.uaQ ja<j 


12.4 
19.9 


CO 

1 

05 


•(spunoj) 
j a 31 u 1 1 q puB saqsy 


765 
15,065 


15,830 


•(spunoj) 
3 u 1 5[ u b q puB Sui 
-duihd ui pauinsuoo ^63 


6,170 

75,785 


81,955 


•(suon^o uoqiipi) 

dqg JOJ p9AiOJp3 ^U8Q 

ja<j g 'paduind A^UBno 


5.26 
63.58 


68.84 


aunj, Suiduinj x B ^°X 


Hrs. Min. 

12 00 
143 00 


"5 1 


W 

H 
55 

O 




• 














cj 3 -g _r „ - . 3 § .a § e 

0-SeSp,c35'=3» - So<» 


Total, 
Average, 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



175 



B 

.-si 
■♦«» 

© 

-KS 

b 



a. 

■"S3 

© 

"© 
b 






B 

o 



"TO 



B 



6 

H 

< 
EH 



03 




CO 


CM 


CM 


its 


CM 


CO 


■>* 


l-H 


■«*i 


v> 


CO 


00 




00 




'(SUOflBQ HOI[ 


CM 

OS 


OO 


t^ 


C5 




CO 


OS 
CO 


OS 




OS 
1—1 


CM 


CO 


CM 

O 


US 

•>* 




co 


3-^ 


"IIH) padrand 





l>. 


t~ 


t^ 


t~ 


t>. 


f OS 


OS 


00 


t>. 


I» 


t>. 


1 


t^ 


*o 


A^tq-UBnQ 






























W | 


aSBjaAy a^ibq 






























°00 






























































» A 
"5 


•(snojp3£) notj 


CM 


O 


CM 

CO 


00 


OS 





00 


CM 

OS 


CM 

OS 


l-H 


O 


00 


OS 


CO 

us 




-UK) d HS -k>J 


■* 


OS 


CM 


CM 


T-I 





,_, 


■>* 


CO 


CO 





,H 


CM 






paAvonB "^naQ 


1— 1 
CM 




CM 


CM 
CM 


CM 


CM 
CM 


CO 
CM 


00 
CM 


00 

CM 


CM 


CO 
CM 


l-H 
CM 


CO 
CM 


O 
00 




ja<j g 'padrand 


























CM 




to Aii^ubtio pj^ox 






























•SuT^Siq; jo 


O 


O 


O 


O 


O 


O 


O 


O 


CO 


O 


O 


O 


1 





SutqBajj joj uoiqonp 


O 
O 


O 

O 


O 
O 


O 
O 


O 
CO 


O 

O 


O 

O 


CO 






CO 




O 
O 


CO 











~ a (i °N •^a«iao'B|dsi(i 


O 


O 


O 


O 





O 


O 
O 








O 

OO 


O 









CO 


jaStmjj; jo sisbq; "no 


US 


CO 


tH 


CM 


00 


O 




CO 





CO 


OS 


CO 




CO 


•psoQ jo spuno j OOI JQd 


T— 1 


OS 

1— 1 


OS 


OO 
rH 


OS 


O 
1— 1 


-<*i 

O 


CO 




CM 

O 





CO 




us 

OS 




00 




spnnod-q.00^ m AvriQ 




























l-H 


•Sm 


O 





CO 


O 





O 


O 





O 











1 





-^Srj; jo Sui^Bajj JOi 


O 

O 










O 

O 







O 
O 


O 
O 






O 

O 




















uot^onpaa 0^ idng 


O 




US 






O 
O 




CO 


O 
CM 


O 
CO 




OS 


O 

CO 



00 




CO 







d 



iojpaji.ojp3 -q-uaQjajg 


CM 


OS 


00 


OS 


->* 


OO 





l-H 





CO 


OS 


T*l 




CM 


'psoo jo sptmoj OOI «<* 


CM 


CO 


CO 

T— 1 


»o 


rH 


OO 
O 


CM 

O 


-<*l 








00 

OS 


00 

OS 


CO 
OS 




CO 
O 


spunod-qoojj ut Aitiq 




























*"' 




CO 


_ 


>o 


OS 


CO 


t^ 


i—l 


OS 


_ 


CO 


CO 


CO 




T _ l 


•(*QS,flD WFI 8§^-I9AV 


os 






03 

00 


1—1 

OS 


00 

OS 


CO 

O 


O 

O 






CO 
l-H 




T- 1 


CM 


US 

l-H 


1 


CO 
C5 




CM 


CO 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


.CO 


CO 




CO 


•Sui^qSiq; jo Sux 


CO 





** 


OS 


CM 





CM 


OS 


CO 





l-H 


t^ 




-* 


-q/ea jj ioj ubiiioripaQ ojsj 





OJ 


CO 


OS 


OO 


t~ 


l-H 


"* 


t— 


CO 


OO 


t^ 


1 


CO 


tdijg ioj .paMOjjB "quaQ 
ja j z 'poo jo ptmoj 


CO 







00 







OO 
O 


OS 

OS 
OS 


OS 


CO 

OS 


l-H 
OS 




OS 


O 
OS 


us 

00 




OS 


jad padrand suojjbq 



































CO 


10 


■* 


CM 


CO 


CO 


OS 


t~ 


CM 


«o 


T-H 







•ja^nno 


■«*< 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CM 


CO 


CM 


t-- 


00 


t^ 


■* 


US 


1 


CO 


puB sairsy jo •quao ja<j 




























l-H 




us 


<M 





»o 


lO 


•«* 


r~- 


"* 





10 


us 


u> 


t^ 


1 




«SH 


-* 


00 


00 


00 


OS 


*a 


CM 





1*1 


"* 


t^ 


^ 




•(spnnoj) 


00 


00 


CO 


■* 


1—1 


CM 


CO 


»"1 


tfi 


OS 


t^ 


00 


l-H 




j a 3[ u 1 1 q puB saqsy 


00 

CM 


tn 

CM 


CN 


CO 

CM 


CM 


OO 
CO 


CD 
CO 


CO 


CO 


■<*l 


CO 
CO 





OO 






00 


O 


CO 


lO 


tH 





OS 


CO 


l-H 


CO 


CO 


us 


tH 


1 


•(spunoj) 


CO 


O 
O 


CO 


CM 

CO 


t^ 
t^ 


OO 


CO 
CM 


CO 
CO 


CO 


CM 

OS 


"S 
OS 




l-H 


CM 




3uT3[UBq pus Sni 


CO 


■>* 


"<*< 


t-~ 


OO 





OS 


CO 





l-H 


CM 


l-H 


Tfl 




-dirind ux paumsuoo tboq 




CM 


C35 




CM 


OS 

T-I 


OS 

T-I 


CO 
CM 


OS 

CM 


OS 
CM 




CM 


CO 
CM 


CO 
CM 


CM 


OS 
CM 






CM 


O 


CM 


"* 


CO 


O 


CM 


CM 


CO 


t-~ 


00 


OS 


CM 




•(suon«r) uotinK) 


t^ 


lfl> 


CO 


OO 


00 


O0 


OS 


OS 


00 


O 


t- 




t^ 


1 


dijg jo j pajioTps •q.uao 


1— 1 


OS 

O 


CM 
CM 


CM 


1—1 


O 

CO 


l-H 
O0 


00 


CM 

OO 


CO 





l-H 

CO 






ja^j g 'padumd Aii!iuBn£) 


CN 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


i-H 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 






d"5 


O 


O 


O 


O 


O 


O 


US 


O 


Iti 


US 


us 


»o 


1 




•5 i-t 


CM 


<«* 


T-I 


O 


O 


CM 


CM 


O 


CM 


-i* 





CM 




•araix Snidranj psqoj, 






























£*- 


T-I 


»o 


IO 


CO 


US 


CM 


CO 


f- 


CO 


■* 


CO 


O 


1 






IO 


CO 


IO 


Hi 


tr~ 


CO 


CO 




OO 


US 


t~ 


CO 






CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CO 


CO 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CO 




K 
H 

O 


































03 

s 


►-9 


u 

S 

CJ 




03 


"C 

ft 

<5 


>> 

03 


a 


r-S 


■+3 

DC 

M 

< 


t-" 
0) 
£> 

B 

CD 

a 

CO 


a> 
O 

+s 






(h" 

S 

> 





.0 
B 

a; 


Q 


"5 

O 
H 


9 

tt 

03 

tH 

> 

< 



176 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



>-< 

e 

o 

r«S 



© 

©> 



"^ 



>- 1 



s-s 

©* 

© 



eg 



6 

B 



•3ui^q§iT 


o 
o 


o 

O 


o 
© 


o 

© 


o 
o 


© 


o 
© 


© 


© 
© 


© 
© 


© 
© 


© 
© 


i 


© 
© 


jo Sm^eajj joj uoporip 
-8Q o'^j I^uauiaoBfdsiQ 
j8Sanj<j io stsbq; no 


© 
© 


© 

o 
© 

cs 

00 


© 
© 

IO 
CO 

© 


© 
© 

o 


o 
o 

CO 
CO 

OS 


o 
o 

CM 

oo 


© 
© 

CM 

© 

CM 


© 
© 

O0 

•^ 

CM 


© 
© 
© 

CO 


© 
© 


© 

© 
© 


© 
© 

CN 

CO 




© 
© 

CO 

© 

OS 


'I^oq io spunoj 001 -i^d 


tO 


to 


CO 


o 


"5 


to 


CO 


© 


CO 


CO 


to 


to 




to 


spunod-^oo^ ui A^riQ 






























•Sni 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


i 


© 


© 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 




© 


-iqSrj jo Sax^ajj joj 
noi^onpaQ 6$[ idijg 

JOj'p8AiOlp3^U80 jaj z 


© 
© 

CO 

oo 
© 


© 

© 
o 

CS 


© 
© 

<M 

CO 

cT 


C5 

o 

OS 


o 
o 

CM 

CO 
00 


o 
o 

CO 


© 
© 

CS_ 

© 


© 

© 
CN 


© 
© 

to 
°i 


© 
© 

CO 

© 


© 
© 

CO 

CO 

CO 


© 

© 

OS 

CO 
CO 




© 

© 
to 

CO 

00 


'p30Q io spunoj 001 Jad 


to 


tO 


tO 


»o 


»o 


to 


CO 


© 


CO 


CO 


to 


to 




to 


epunod-^oo^ m jtyriQ 
































o 


CO 


CO 


CO 


o 


CO 


CO 


00 




CO 


t^ 


to 




CO 




"* 


© 


© 


00 


l-» 


CO 


' _l 


t^ 


CM 


© 


CO 


CO 




■^1 


'(^99J) «H 93BJ8AV 


OO 


00 


O0 


CO 


oo 


CM 

00 


00 


to 

oo 


r-l 
OO 


00 


© 

CO 


00 




CM 

00 




cm 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


c<» 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 




CM 


•SurjqSrj jo Sui 


© 




CO 


•tf 


->*< 


to 


© 


OS 


oo 


IO 


© 


oo 






-'Veajj joj noi^onpaQ o^j 


© 


to 


to 


o 


to 


CO 


OS 


OS 


CM 


© 


© 


CO 


i 


eo 


idtjg joj pakojjB luaQ 


CO 


CO 


CM 
IO 


CO 

»o 


O0 


CM 


to 


to 




OS 

to 


IO 


OS 
CM 




OS 


jaj g 'p^oQ jo punoj 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 




CM 


J9d paduind sno[p3Q 
































o 


00 


IO 


t^ 


l» 


to 


CO 


OS 


CM 


J—l 


© 


O 




"*< 


•J831UIJO 


CM 


"5 


OS 


CO 


oo 


CO 


OS 


© 


CO 


to 


t~- 


tO 






puB sausy jo '^uaQ jaj 
































o 


CM 


t>- 


OS 


t^ 


oo 


CM 


CM 


© 


CO 


CO 


-r* 


CO 


1 






■**i 


o 


->tl 


■* 


CO 


CM 


CO 


1— 1 


IO 


CO 


00 


CO 




•(spunoj) 


CM 




CO 


CO 


oo 


t^. 


OS 


OO 


t- 


CM 


•^ 


00 


t^ 










O0 




t^ 






CO 


CM 


to 


t^ 


CO 


CM 




J93 [ n n0 P UB sausy 












CM 


CM 


CM 










CM 






o 


O 


o 


»o 


>o 


o 


»o 


© 


CO 


to 


© 


© 


© 


1 


•(epunoj) 


OO 


CD 
00 


CM 




OS 


OS 

o 


OO 
CM 


00 


© 


OS 
CM 


CO 

eo 


© 

CM 


© 




3 u i 3{ u c q puB 3ui 
-drahd ui paumsuoo \b6q 


CO 


tO 


CO 


IO 


IO 


i-H 


CM 


© 


CO 


^ 


t^ 


CM 


tO 




© 


© 


OS 


oo 


OS 


o 


CO 


1— t 


© 


© 


OS 


y-l 


CM 






t^- 


00 


t>- 


IO 


CO 


CO 


CM 




CO 


**< 


eo 


t>. 






•(suo t p30 noiniK) 


co 


CO 


CO 


t~ 


CO 


to 


t^ 


OS 


t~ 


CM 


-cH 


t^ 


■* 


| 


dljg JOJ p9M.O^p3 '%U9Q 


o 


CO 
<M 


CO 
CM 


CM 


CO 
CM 


■«tl 

CM 


CO 
CO 


© 

CO 


CO 
CM 


© 
CM 


CM 


tO 

CM 


to 

© 




ja<IS 'paduind ^i^ubiiq 
































is 


to 


o 


IO 


o 


o 


to 


to 


© 


to 


© 


© 


to 


1 




■* 


o 


y— ) 


CO 


eo 


■>* 


■* 


© 


.-H 


© 


© 


"<tl 




•aunj, Suidumj p3}ox 












- 


















m "** 


oo 


IO 


oo 




CM 


CM 


•* 


to 






to 




1 




£eo 


00 


o 


CO 


o 


CM 


CO 


C5 


CM 


CO 




-* 


t^ 






w^ 


-<tl 


IO 


"* 


»o 


to 


CO 


IO 


to 


to 


tO 


tO 


CM 

CO 




o 






























B 
































>! 


>> 














s-T 
o 


ts 




o 

J2 


"ej 


CJO 

S 

0) 




In 


A 


J? 












C 


o 


H 


a 

o 

Q 


O 


> 




S3 

3 

c3 

•-5 


3 
U 

Si 
a 


o 

u 

a 


"(H 

< 


>> 


a 

1-9 


>> 

"3 

►-9 


3 

s 
< 


a 

o 

02 


^2 
O 
o 

O 


> 

O 


H 


< 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



177 



>-h 
-to 



^2 
•<o 

s 

o 

•to 



>~4 



•<o 



o 

to 

e 

v. 

O 



HO 
"»0 

e 

to 



CO 

d 

.J 

< 





co 


•(suon'er) uoq 


■* 


-* 


•»*< ITS 


CO OS 


00 


1-H 


i—i 


CO ■«*< 


,_ 




00 




z 


-I!W) d HS JO J 





00 


CO (M 


CD T-l 

t^ 00 




0O 

O 


C5 
OO 


OO OO 


CO 

00 




ITS 
OO 




o£ 


paAio^B '^uaQ 










y— 1 


1— 1 








1 






55 a 


ja<j ^ 'paduind 


























fag 


^(JT^UBTTQ 


























°o 


aSBjaAy a'tibq 


























•(suojjbq uoq 




CO 


CO 
CO 


t— It} 
cd r~ 


CO CD 

CO «o 


CO 




CO 


■* CO 
CM ■* 




CO 
C<1 






-I!K) d HS JOJ 


■* 


CO 


CO 1-H 


CO -*l 


■>* 


CO 


CO 


CD -* 


"5 


CO 


1 




Sj§ 


paAioriB "^uaQ 






<M <M 


CM CM 


CO 


CO 


CM 


CM CM 


CN) 


CO 






S^ 1 


ja<j f 'paduind 


























A^U'BnQ J'B'JO x 


























•SuriqSTT; jo 


O 
O 


1 


1 1 


1 1 









1 


1 1 


1 


1 








SuriBajj joj uofjonp 


O 



























-aQ o^j ^uauiaoTqdsTQ 


O 
CO 










CD 













© 




jaSun[<j jo STS'eg no 


t^ 








OO 


TP 










CO 




'[VOQ jo spuno j 001 J 3Ci 


CO' 








-# 


•* 










CO 




SpuriOCt-q.00^ UT A^UQ 


























•Sut 





1 


1 1 


1 1 


O 





1 


1 1 


1 


1 







-ycfil'J JO 3UT^B8H JOJ 











O 


















uoi^onpaQ djsi Idqy 




OS 








O 




CO 












US 




JO J paAS.OJJ'B - ^U9Q ja<J f 


CO 








O 













t>- 




'[130Q jo spunoj 001 -13 d 


CM 








CO 


^ 










co 




spunod-^oo^ ut A"q.nQ 




























CM 








00 


CO 










■* 






OS 








»o 


CD 










t~- 




•ftaatf) *?n Q2«J3av 


CD 


1 


1 1 


1 1 


OO 



CO 


CO 
O 
CO 


1 


1 1 


1 


1 


OS 
OO 
CM 




•SuT^qSyx jo Sut 


CO 








OO 


CM 










CM 




-q/eaij jojuoT^DnpoQ oj^; 




1 


1 1 


1 1 






1 


1 1 


1 


1 






idqg JOJ p9AYOJ|13 "^uaQ 


<M 








"0 


CD 










CO 




ja j ■& 'tt?oo jo punoj 


























jad paduind suojrBQ 




























"H 








CO 


O 










^ 




•J83TUTJO 





1 


1 1 


1 1 





O 


1 


1 1 




1 


*<# 




puis saqsy jo '^uaQ ja^ 




























_ 


1 


1 1 


1 1 





Oi 


1 


1 1 


1 





1 






"* 










lO 














•(spunoj) 
j a >[ u t j q put? saqsy 


CO 








CM 


CM 

CO 
















10 


1 


1 1 


1 O 


US 





1 


1 1 


1 





1 




•(spunoj) 









OS 

i— 1 


CM 


OS 








CO 






3ni5[nBq put* Sut 


CO 








CD 


CO 








10 






-duihd ut pauinsuoo i^oq 




























CO 






CO 


"5 


_ 








(M 






•(suottbo uotrrift) 


CNI 


1 


1 1 



1 


OS 


CO 


1 


1 1 


1 


OO 


1 




dqg JOJ p8MOJTB "'4U8Q 


•^ 










cm' 








t^ 






ja<I f 'padurnd A'-jT'iu'enQ 




























do 


1 


1 1 


1 


O 


»n 


1 


1 1 


I 


yti 


1 






.5 






CO 


CO 


■«** 








■«* 








3 
























•8TUTX SuTduinj TB^OJ, 


w 


1 


1 1 


1 1 


CM 


CO 


1 


1 1 


1 


CM 

CM 


1 




W 
























EH 
























& 

















































s 




























s 


>> 

cS 

f-l 

fa 


March, 
April, 


May, 
June, 




-t-> 

a 

< 


Si 

a 

a 

02 


October, . 
November, 


u 

a 

Q 


P 3 



tU 1 ' 

> 



178 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 









ft* 

ft. 

&3 



"f-H 

>- 1 
co 

6q 



© 
O 



CD 

*© 
^2 



6 

pq 
< 



•%u\%x\2i r i jo 
Sui^ajj joj uopohpaQ oj^[ 
UuauiaoB^dsiQjaSunu jo 
siseg no '\vsoq jo spunoj; 
00 1 J^d spunod-^oo^ ui XpQ 



•Suiiqgrj 
jo Sup'Bajj joj ubiq.onp 

-d(J OJ^[ Idljg JOJ p8AYOJp3 

•^U8Q jajj '[T303 jospunoj 
001 J3d spunod-^ooj ui A^uq 



~ OS i-H 



in *-< »-i 



o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


O 






o 


o 


:r> 


oo 


00 


<* 






o 




-f 


1* 



O « 
> 



'H "°N auiSug; 



*8l 'ON auiSua 



co eo eo co 



•gui^tpftx jo Sui^ajj 
joj uox^onpaQ o$[ idijg joj 
paAvoips -lua^jajg'pkojo 
punoj jad paduind suo[[B£) 



pus sausy jo 



•ja^uitO 

■%U3Q jaj 



•(spunoj) 
ja^ni{3 pui3 sausy I^ox 



•(spunoj) 
Suppreq pu^ Suiduind 
ui pauinsuoo yeoQ i^ox 



•(suon*Q uoiniK) 
di[g joj pa.\i.oip3 - ^uaQ ja<j 
Z 'paduind A^tq.u'enQ p3^ox 



l-H i-l CS| 



CM -I i-H 



t^ 


m 


oo 


CO 


02 


CM 


,_, 


CM 


CM 


r~ 


^ 


oo 


"3 1 


^* 


CO 


00 


Oi 


o 


OS 


CM 


CO 


■Jf 




iO 


eo 


e» 


CM 


oo 


■** 


o 


CO 


OS 


CD 


lO 


Tt< 


CM 


1^ 


i—i 


OS 


VH 


^H 


co 


CM 


CM 


ICH 


T— , 


^H 


«5 


CO 


»o 


,-H 


o 


»o 


lO 


lO 


LO 


>c 


lO 


CO 


CO 


iO 


in 


lO 


CO 


CO 



OS ^H -H 



o 
3 



•(SUO( 

-i«o n °imH) <*HS 
joj paAiojp "^uaQ jaj 
2 'paduind ^i^ubuq 



•auiix Suiduinj j^ox 



H ^H CM 



■* H i-H 



K- 



o 

iz; 

5 
is 

K 



•(suoj 

-i b o ^oi n iw) di t s 

ioj pa.viO[}t! ^uaQ jaj 
2 'paduind A^t^u'enQ 



•auitx 3uiduinj p^^ox 



o 



Co 



in • tT . - M 

S^ 1) cu S ~ c 3 

I ■ * i 4 a * s I I I I - 1 * * 

g o J3 ft « §3 3 g-uo^ 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



179 



=ft 


<**> 


rO 




^3 








», 


<4> 

p*o 


ft. 


r-O 


^ 


,C3 


co 


bs 


CO 


oi 


s: 


<» 


3 


CO 




to 


"W 


J- 


£ 


co 


C 


Q 


CO 




oi 


i- 




<4> 




to 


•<s> 


W 


<o 


fe 


<w 




r< 


s? 




e 


£ 


to 

•<s> 








© 


co 


©^ 


V 


o 


•^> 


s- 


V. 


to 


to 


cii 


CO 

•<s> 


* 

<» 


Si 


© 


eO 


i-se 




fe 


to 




C 


s 


fe 




«+-, 


to 


O 


© 


g 


^ 



I" 

co -« 
g &• 

«_ co 

© w 
co' g 

•<S> -co 

co 

oq 1! 



16 § 

O ° 

< 





el 

■+* ■ 






























ft, 5f! 

fi COO" 


























































eo 





^ 


CO 


t-~ 


00 


CO 


co 


C5 


co 


CO 


CO 













OS 


00 


00 


00 


C3 


Os 


00 


00 


CO 


02 


OS 




3 ft oS'tf 




T-H 


























p 1—1 --' 

























































































T3 C 


O 





O 

















O 


O 





O 







4) O 


CO 


!>• 


O 


^ 


t^ 




■* 


00 




10 


00 


CNI 


5f! 




'Si* 







CO 


•* 


10 


t^ 


00 


02 




CN| 


CO 


in 


CO 


































CO 


»o 


t~ 


OS 




CO 


HO 


I>- 


O 


CNI 


-*l 


CO 


m 
























CNI 


CNI 


CNI 


CNI 






<M 


CM 


CNI 


CNI 


CM 


!M 


<M 


CNI 


<M 


CNI 


CNI 


CNI 


CNI 




w£ 
































O 


O 


O 


O 


O 








O 


O 


O 


O 


O 


O 




n -^ ft-^ 


O 


O 


O 


O 


O 








O 


O 


O 


O 


O 


CD 




t^ 


tf» 


CN> 


CO 


CNI 


CO 


t-- 


CNI 


l«> 


IO 


CO 


■* 


CO 










W" 






















CM 


■* 


CNI 


>o 


CO 


b- 


t~ 


»0 


f^ 


CD 


O 


CNI 




■* 


00 


O 


O 




CO 


CNI 


-* 


t^ 


CO 


rti 


<M 


CO 




CO 




CO 


I>^ 


00 


CNI 


°l 


CO 


00 


Iffl 


CO 


CO 







Ch-S ft c3 








oT 


CO 


■*" 


CO 


cnT 


CO 


00" 


in" 


X" 


CO 









C<l 














i-H 










O 






RTHERN 

ra High 

SRVICE. 






















O 











O 








-2 ato fl S 




















O 











O 








T-H 


00 


»o 


cnT 


00 


cnT 




CNI_ 

co" 


Oi" 


00 

OS 


CO 

in 


CR 
CNI* 




OS 





t^ 


CO 


10 


-^ 


«5 


O 


CNI 


r^ 




I-~ 


t^ 


t^ 


00 


l>. 


«>• 


t^ 


00 






0= 


00 


CO 


CO 


OS 
















~ 


^ 












O 




























;ern 
High 

ICE. 


«4-l c! • 
O O^ 

.2 Ȥ^ 




















O 


O 





O 





























O 


O 





O 











t>._ 


c^ 


°1 


"* 


10 


°i 


CO 


"* 


t^ 


CO 


CO 


CO_ 


rj< 




00" 


"5 


10 


CO* 


cnT 


CO 


' Oi 


oo" 





CO* 





CNl" 


co" 





iO 


«5 


CO 


co 





a> 


CO 


OS 





00 




CO 


CO 


CO 


CD 


CO 


CO 


t-- 


t^ 


t^ 


CO 


t- 


CO 


t^ 


CD 




z 2 


4^1 S© | Its 





O 


O 

















O 








O 


O 





O 


O 

















O 








O 


O 


« > 


t^ 


t^ 


oq_ 


10 


CO 




CO 


uo 


»n 


10 


in 


CO 


**i 


« « 


rt 


O 





-* 


CO 


CO 


00~ 


i>T 


^5" 


t^" 


X" 


CD 


-* 


X a 




O 


00 


(M 









00 









I>. 


CM 


£72 




O 
00 




CO 

1^" 


i>r 




00' 




10 

oT 


00 


00_ 




O 
CO" 


CO" 


w 
W 






























*2 


gSg^-gog 
.t3 i-i>P O 0^=! 
































O 


O 


O 


s « 
































O 


C5 


O 


<M 


co 


10 


a> 


°1 


l>^ 








01 




in 


CO 


tH 


a w 


<m" 


CO. 


CO 


00" 


cnT 


oT 


cnT 


-* 


t--" 


10 


cnT 


co" 


"* 


BCG 

p H 
a 

CO M 

w 


m 


co 


00 


CNI 


t^ 


CO 


■* 


^ 





CNI 


CO 


CNI 


t^ 


in 

CO 


CO 

CO 


eO 

CO 
CO 


cnT 

co 


of 

CO 


co_ 


co" 
CO 


C33 
CD 
CO 




CO 

CO 


CO 


CO 
CO 


CO 
CO 


in 

co 


& 


« 0^ gtS e H §0 § 























O 

















33 S 

►H K 























O 

















00 
cvf 


OS 
CO 


CO 


CO 


TjT 


CO 
CO 


*1 


CD" 


00 


in 
-*" 







eo 

CO 





•>* 




y— 1 


CO 


iC 


CO 


10 


t--. 


■* 





O 




00 


'"l 





00 





■* 


°1 


°i 


b~ 


(M_ 


co_ 


co_ 


Tjf 


1? 

i-5 


CO 


10 

<M 


<m" 





CNJ 


CNI 


CO 
CNI 


cnT 

CNI 


(M 


CM 




CNI 


CNI 


cnT 

CNI 




H 


pi « 




























£ £ 




O 





O 


O 














O 


O 


O 


O 


O 


H p* 

£ a 


O 





O 


O 














O 


O 


O 


O 


O 


eq 


CO 


O 


-* 


l>^ 


•«* 


CO 


°l 


CN 


CO 


CO_ 






00" 





O 


CO 





«5 


«o 


•* 


00" 


. ^ 


in 


in 


os" 


CO 


CO 


on 


CO 


•^ 


00 


00 




CO 


CO 


m 


(M 


•* 


O'o ^ * (h o3 


"■* 


eq 


co 


-* 


00 


»o_ 


■* 


CO 


b- 


°l 


CO 


•* 


b- 


CO O 




b- 


oT 


■* 











CNl" 


O 


<~r 


on" 


»n 


CNl" 


-* 


tH 


•* 


tH 


■* 


•* 


-* 


tC 


-* 


CO 


CO 


-* 


■* 


W O 






























w 


























t-T 
oj 






H 


























>> 




K 


















_ 




fc 




4> 




O 


(h 

CI 
03 

•-5 


>> 

u 

03 


O 

u 

03 


ft 
< 


03 



c 

t-s 


>-5 


CO 

M 
< 


O 

s 

ft 
CU 
CO 


co 
O 

O 


M 

ID 

S 

> 

O 


S 


p 


X! 
• -(J 

h 
O 



& 




T5 

















ft 


a 


ft 





3 




01 


03 


m 




a 


O 


£ 


O 
02 


-73 


05 


s 




03 


n-< 



O <D 
T3 03 

O ±? 



$ 



03 ^ 



co 


a 

"3 


+j 


> 


C 




0) 


2 


£ 


cr 


c 




h 


m 


a> 


c 


> 





r> 




CJ 


03 




01: 






1) 


CJ> 


■p 





rt 







CO 




T3 


t- 


O 


•* 


+J 


A 


5 


4J 


P 


CJ 







^3 


3 


-M 


sn 


00 


3 


0) 


rt 


43 


r/7 










d 


O 


a 




3 


(-. 


O" 




0; 




> 


c3 




■9 


C 
03 


A; 




J3 


m 


4-> 


a 


O 









c 


C3 

tin 











73 





TJ 


r^ 


rt 


CO 


a 


MH 


HH 






O 



180 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 






© 
© 

J- 



<» 

.< 



co 

s 

o 



s 



is- 

>-H 



8 

o 

*C>i 

CO 

O 

O 

•<S> 

•to 
©S 

©• 



OQ 



CO 



O 

6 

a 

< 









ei 




















, 
















u •£ 


o 


o 


OS 


to 


»o 


o 


CO 


y—t 


co 


t» 


CO 


1— ( 


© 










Ph e3 


ia 


"3 


*HH 


■«* 


■<HH 


lO 


ia 


m 


*a 


TjH 


■hhh 


"0 


If 




Q 




to 






























M 


o 


g 


U 






























O 


CO 


o 






























































O 


co 
co 


n3 

•< 


>> 

eg 


© 


O 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 




a 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 




OS 


CM 


<o 


to 


o 


»o 


I--. 


CM 


■^1 


CO 


CO 


OS 


CO 




§ 







P 


cm 


t>T 


to 


■<* 


to 


oo 


oo 


o 


o 


»o 


CD 


t~r 


,_r 












CO 


■<*< 


CM 


CM 


OS 


CD 


t^ 


OS 


OS 


CO 


•<f 


CM 


3 










0) 


CO 


«o 


to 


»o 


■* 


CO 


f~ 


CO 


t-- 


"3 


lO 


t^ 










ft, 




































03 




































^ -^ 


© 


o 


00 


CO 


to 


OS 


«o 


t--. 


^H 


U0 


oo 


■* 


CO 










ft 03 

O 


*0 


<o 


»o 


m 


«o 


»o 


t^ 


CO 


CD 


CO 


kO 


00 


© 




h 

o 


© 
































5 


t4 

co 


O 

a 

< 
































>> 
G8 

P 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 




o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 




O" 


OS 


f^ 


CM 


O0 


oo 




CM 




o 


If 


CD 


OS 


O0 






o 




































o 


t^. 


to 


b- 


00 


-<f 


■**< 


o 


o 


OS 


© 


00 


CO 












OS 


"* 


OS 


t^ 


1—1 


lO 


-*1 


00 


CM 


1—1 


"■*■ 


cS 


© 










o 


CO 


lO 


"^1 


CM 


"*L 


»o 


CM 


00 


to 


oo 


lO 


t^ 












































ft 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


c<r 


C<1 


CO 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CO 


CM 










03 


i—l 


oo 


t~ 


CM 


o 


■* 


tr~- 


OS 




o 


1— 1 


t^- 


CO 










Ph e? 


OO 


CO 


t^ 


t^ 


t~ 


t^ 


t-- 


t^ 


t^ 


t^. 


t^ 


O0 


b- 




H 




EC 






























Eh 
H 

s 


© 


£ 


o 






























00 


o 






























































a 


en 

CO 


J 


>> 

03 


O 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 




> 


< 




o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 




1* 


OS 


o 


CO 


lO 


CM 


o 


CM 


OS 


o 




CO 


© 




W 




Q 


1*T 


oo 


o 


OS 


CO 


CM 


_r 


»* 


lO 


CO 


OS 


i>r 


CO 












t^ 


lO 


lO 


CM 


oo 


CO 


oo 


1*1 




o 


■«*< 


oo 


CO 










O" 




-*l 


o 


00 


t^ 


OS 


o 




00 


oo 


O0 


■* 


© 












































ft 


00 


CO 


CO 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CO 


CO 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CO 


CO 










03 


CO 


oo 


OS 


lO 


CO 


CO 


CM 




oo 


t^ 


co 


CO 


© 










f ft 


t^ 


t~ 


to 


CO 


CO 


CO 


t^ 


t>. 


CD 


CO 


CD 


!>• 


© 




•< 




OQ 


Ah o3 






























B 


© 


g 


O 






























2 


o 

CO 


o 






























































B 




J 


>> 

03 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


o 




w 


-< 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 




"^1 


CM 






t>- 


°t 


00 


OS 




00 


CD 


OS 


H5 









o 


P 


i>T 


CO 


OS 


o 


CO 


O0 


CM 


CO 


^4" 


CO 


CD 


00 


oo 














iO 


to 


o 


Tj< 


o 


CO 


OS 


CD 


o 


U0 


CM 


00 










© 


CO 


>o 


»-H 


o 


o 


OS 


CO 


CM 


»—t 




© 


1*1 












ft 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CM 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CM 


CO 


CO 










03 

u "2 


OS 


o 


OS 


oo 


oo 


CO 


OS 


co 


Irt 


co 


CM 


a> 


t^ 






© 


JO 

8 


«®'ft 

Ph o3 
O 


-**< 


no 


T*t 


■<* 


•<J< 


■** 


Tt< 


T*l 


-»*< 


■* 


■** 


■"* 


1*1 




G 
5 


r-l 


o 

■J 
































>> 

03 

P 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 




o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 




S 


t^ 


CM 


CO 


y-i 


OS_ 


CD 


CO 


o 


t>- 


"*i 


1— 1 


1—1 


CO 












OS 


t>r 


to 


CD 


■W 


CO 


CO 


OS* 


"5 


00 


lO 


OS 










F_, 


CO 


iO 


OS 


to 


"5 


■* 


1—1 


CO 


CM 


CM 


oo 


© 












o 


■<*< 


lO 


■* 


-* 


-«*" 


CO 


HO 


^ 


CO 


CM 




lO 


If 












































ft 


<M 


CM 


CM 


CM 


<M 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 










03 


oo 


CM 


-HH 


OS 


00 


1—t 


CO 


"•^t 


o 


o 


© 


© 


CO 




a 






<? ft 


t^ 


oo 


t^ 


to 


CO 


t^ 


r^ 


t^. 


t^ 


t>- 


t^ 


t^. 


t^ 




h9 




02 


Ph o3 






























a 


© 


a 


o 






























> 


CO 

© 


O 

a 






























































B 

a 


en 


j 


p 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 




5 



o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 




CO 


■* 


00 


to 


o 


OS 


t>- 


iO 


OS 


to 


•«* 








o 




































co 


oo 


l^ 


o 


CO 


CO 


-CH 


o 


OS 




CO 


t>- 


© 




CO 






(h 


OS 


CO 


to 


ITS 




"5 


•^ 


t^ 


t^ 


CO 


l^ 




t-- 










9 


OS 


-* 


to 


CM 


CM 


^t< 


OS 


t» 


CO 


•»* 


CO 


CM 


© 












































ft 


to 


t^- 


to 


CO 


CO 


o 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


t^ 


CO 










03 

l< HJ 

Ph S? 


»o 


oo 


r^ 




CM 


CM 


"0 


t^ 


■^ 




r^ 


CO 


CO 














o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


© 




© 




fc 


o 


CD 


o 






























O 
H 

s 


CS| 
































u» 


o 

a 




o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 




to 


J 


>l 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


© 


o 


o 


© 




e- 


3 
o 


03 

P 


«o 




CO 




o 




o 


»o 


*o 


© 


CO 


© 


CM 




« 


t» 


r>T 


Ttl" 


■>* 


,_7 


t~r 


t^r 


CO 


»>r 


o 


uf 


oo 


t>r 


CO 










CO 


CM 


to 


CO 


"^H 


CM 


CO 


t^. 


CM 


CO 


© 


oo 


t^. 










h 


e* 


CO 


CM 


OS 


t>- 


00 


CO 


1— 1 


t^ 


"*f 


CO 




© 










ft 




































CO 




CM 


t^ 


oo 


oo 




CO 


o 


00 


1/5 


CO 


CM 










oo 


OS 


00 


t^ 


l^ 


t~ 


O0 


oo 


oo 


t^ 


t~ 


CO 


00 










B 


























03 




d 






o 


























9 




is 
o 

(-. 
O 

>> 

s 


a 
_o 

ft 

o 
ft 




S 


>> 
u 

03 

3 

a 

03 

•-s 


>. 
u 

03 

s 
u 

ft 


^5 
o 

a 


< 


>> 

03 


a 




m 

3 
bfl 

3 

< 


a) 

s 

o 

ft 

CO 
02 


£> 
o 

o 

o 


u 
0) 

s 

> 
o 


s 

s 

o 

p 


01 

u 

o 

ft 





No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



181 



"43 

o 
O 



© 



O 
£ 



© 

-to 

Si, 

&0 

o 



05 



CO 

6 

H 
hh 

m 
■< 
H 









03 


































*"! g 

^ ft 
Ph c? 

O 


lO 


t>. 


>o 


t^. 


00 


CM 


Oi 


^^ 


CO 


Oi 


to 


t^ 


CM 


Ph 

o 


o 


CO 


•"* 


■* 


** 


•* 


Tt» 


>o 


CO 


t^ 


lO 


■* 


■<* 


-* 


lO 




© 


O 
►J 






























>> 

03 

A 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


O 


o 


o 


o 


-0 

o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 




T-H 


o 


t- 




•>* 


CO 




■* 


l-H 






o 


CM 


^ 




Oi 


CO 


Oi 


CM 


CO 


CM 


t^ 


•># 


CM 


Oi 


CO 


-* 


1>T 












*n 


CM 


»o 


CO 


CO 


CO 


Oi 


Oi 


Oi 


CO 


t^. 


CM 










CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


t~ 


Oi 


Oi 


t^ 


CO 


CO 


CO 


l>- 








Ph 


































c3 


































F-i g 


00 


OS 


00 


O0 


o 


■* 


t^ 


"SM 


CM 


O 


eo 


v-H 


tH 








/? ft 
Ph es 

O 


CO 


CO 


CO 


eo 


■* 


-«f 


•* 


-* 


-* 


■* 


■«* 


-* 


"* 


o 


o 


CO 

O 






























US 

o 






























J 
j 




o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


§ 


0> 


a 


o 


o 


© 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 




00 


CO 


o 


o 


-* 


1-H 


Oi 


CM 


CNI 


eo 


CO 


o 


o 






t^ 


CO 


00 


OS 


CM 


o 


CM 


Oi 


i-H 


io 


o 


«5 


>o 










CO 


-* 


CO 


CO 


CO 


o 


CM 


Oi 


O0 


O 


Oi 


t^ 


t^ 










CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


eo 


■<tl 


•>* 


eo 


CO 


H* 


eo 


eo 


eo 








Ph 




































o3 


































u g 


00 


CM 


Ui 


CM 


Ui 


Oi 


eo 


CO 


•* 


t~ 


■* 


oo 


i—{ 


O 




OB 


«° ft 
Ph £ 


•o 


CO 


US 


»o 


"5 


to 


00 


t^ 


CO 


ta 


"5 


»o 


CO 


H 


e 


fc 


O 




























5 

M 
J 

PS 


ft 


o 

j 
j 






























>> 

03 

Q 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


O 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


CO 


"5 


© 


lO 


CO 




CM 


eo 


■* 


CM 


oo 


Oi 


































< 






■* 


tr^ 


CO 




■* 


CM 


CO 


Iffl 


■* 


CO 


eo 


Oi 


t^. 








CM 


00 


00 


eo 


Oi 


CO 


Oi 


eo 


lO 


CO 


Oi 


o 


Oi 








a> 


Oi 


a> 


00 


00 


00 


Oi 


CO 


CM 


o 


Oi 


00 


Oi 


Oi 








Ph 














^ 


-* 


r-( 
















oi 


































u g 


-* 


■* 


00 


t^ 


eo 


o 


o 


CM 


>o 


CM 


CO 


"# 


Oi 


£ 






/? ft 
Ph o3 


r~ 


t~ 


t~ 


t^ 


oo 


o 


o 


o 


Oi 


Oi 


Oi 


Oi 


00 


fs= 




CQ 












1-1 




'""' 












o 


o 


fc 


o 




























1 


e 


O 

1 






























>> 

03 


© 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


© 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


E-c 




00 


-* 


CO 


»« 


CO 


«o 


«o 


1^ 


Oi 


CM 






CD 


«! 

£ 




A 
































»o 


CO 


CO 


s 


•* 


CO 


CM 


eo 


00 


CO 


Oi 


CM 


T)< 








o 


o 


t^ 


00 


00 


O0 


eo 


o 


CO 


00 


o 


oo 








CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


•* 


t^ 


t- 


00 


t^ 


CD 


CD 


!>• 


ta 








Ph 


































oi 


































f- g 


m 


o 


»o 


eo 


eo 


CO 


i-H 


o 


1— 1 


CM 


Oi 


Ir^ 


00 








Ph o3 


>o 


CO 


"5 


lO 


iO 


o 


t- 


t>- 


CO 


US 


■* 


iO 


Ui 


H 




CO 




























« 


© 


fc 


a 






























© 

00 
C4 


O 






























>> 

o3 

a 


o 


CO 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o, 


o 


O 


o 


O 


O 


o 


H 


C5 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


« 


00 


CO 


o 


t^ 


lO 


Oi 


eo 


00 


lO 


CM 


■* 


Tf 


■* 








«? 




o> 


CO 


o 


Oi 


eo 


■* 


eo 


t^ 


w 


CO 


to 










o 


■* 




l^ 


oo 


CO 


O0 


00 




t~ 


o 


CM 












>o 


CO 


lO 


-* 


-* 


iO 


Oi 


Oi 


t^- 


■* 


•* 


CO 


CO 








Ph 


































03 


































»h g 


m 


00 


OJ 


00 


OS 


eo 


t^ 


00 


Oi 


■* 


l>- 


o 


^ 








/? ft 
Ph ot 


-* 


Tj( 


rt< 


•<* 


■>* 


lO 


"5 


o 


>fll 


*a 


-*l 


*a 


>o 


H 




co 




























O 


o 


fc 


o 




























US 


O 


























































►H 


1-1 




03 

a 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


w 


< 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 




CO 


tf5 


CM 


in 


t^ 


CO 


CO 


eo 


Tt< 


t* 


OO 


oo 


Oi 


§ 


































CO 


t^ 




00 


Oi 


l>- 




»— i 




o 


i>- 




CM 










!>. 


CO 


CO 


CO 


IC 


CM 


CO 


CM 


-* 


tfi 




Jr- 


o 








CO 


t^ 


00 


oo 


00 


oo 


Oi 


o 


o 


o 


Oi 


00 


00 


Oi 








Ph 














^ 


*— 1 


1— 1 
















B 


































H 


































15 


































O 


































§ 


























03 



































co 

>, 


o 

+5 


a 
.2 






^ 


s 














a> 

J2 






0> 

Xi 


co 
Xi 

+3 


In 

o 
>> 

-*> 

o 


O 

Ph 






u 
03 

§ 

03 


03 
u 


^3 
u 

h 

03 


ft 


>> 

o3 


oi" 
(3 
3 
i-s 


> 


3 
< 


fa 
<S> 
+i 
ft 


£> 
O 

+i 
o 

O 


a 

eo 
> 
o 


£ 

co 
o 

co 

Q 


£ 



182 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



^5 
3 



O 

O 









© 

© 

fe- 



ci} 

C3> 
C3 

Si 



CO 
CM 

6 

m 
< 









ea 






























2« 






u *» 


CO 


o 


♦— i 


CO 


f~ 


oo 


CO 


CO 


O 


CO 


CO 


o 


© 








,-P'ft 

Ph e? 


CI 


o 


C2 


oo 


00 


oo 


o 


OS 


oo 


oo 


00 


OS 


OS 




e 

00 


02 


O 






























o 
































& H 


Ifl 


J 




O 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


© 


o 


o 




o 5 


*-l 


J 


>, 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


© 


© 




B5 S 


cm 


< 


03 


t^ 


"5 


CM 


co 


CM 


CO 


t^ 


CM 


lO 


lO 


oo 


Ttl 


CO 




^Q 
































•■— 





Q 


ea 


■^ 


CM 


lO 


"5 


CO 


r^ 


t^ 


IC 


t^ 


CO 


© 


CM 




W 






■* 


00 


o 


o 




CO 


CM 


s 


t^ 


CO 


-* 


CM 


oo 




s 






t_, 


CO 


^H 


CO 


t~ 


00 


CM 


C5 


oo 


"5 


00 


CO 


© 










































V 


IC> 


o 


OS 


oo 


•^ 


CO 


CM 


CO 


O0 


IC 




00 


© 










Ph 




(M 


o 


o 


o 


o 






o 


o 


© 














o3 






























O 






^ If 


"0 


CO 


■* 


C35 


CO 


•* 


CM 


^H 


^-t 


CO 


© 


© 


i« 






00 


£"§• 


-*l 


CO 


t~ 


CO 


>o 


CO 


a> 


OS 


t^ 


us 


-* 


»o 


CO 




o 


© 


z 


o 






























£ 


O 
































a 


t-^ 


►J 


03 


o 


o 


O 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 




< 


t^" 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


© 


o 


© 






-* 


CM 




■>f 


TtJ_ 


CM 


TP 


o 


CM 


CO 


lO 


OS 


00 




► 




o 


Q 
































t>r 


lO 


CM 


m 


oT 


&> 


c^ 


OS 


t^ 


t>- 


.—t 


CO 


CO 




cc 








^ 


o 


t^ 


CO 


o 


C5 




o 


lO 




O0 


OS 


© 










0) 


co 


"5 


"5 


«o 


■* 


■* 


t^ 


r^ 


»o 


-3H 


CO 


CO 


U0 










Ph 




































03 




































(- -jf 


OC 


(M 


t>- 


^^ 


•>* 


o 


o 


o 


■* 


CM 


-* 


CM 


iO 










a 5 'ft 


*# 


»o 


"3 


CO 


00 


CO 


CO 


Ui 


lO 


oo 


lO 


"3 


© 




H 




w 


Ph o3 












^ H 


CM 


CM 


■^ 








^ H 






© 


o 


O 






























i 


(J 


eg 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 




»H 





o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 




& 




© 


.-H 


CO 


t>- 


o 


o 


t- 


O0 


OS 


t^ 


CO 


"^1 


CO 










© 


ITS 


CO 


OJ 


CO 


CM 


05 


o 


OS 






i>r 


»o 












t^. 


t>- 


00 


oo 


CM 


C35 


CO 


t^ 


CM 


CM 


00 


t^. 


no 










0) 










1-H 


1— H 


CO 


CO 


CM 


fH 
















Pu, 








































03 




































u •+» 


CO 


*o 


C5 


t>- 


CM 


t- 


CO 


o 


■* 


CO 


H 


© 


■* 




o 




X 


a" 'ft 

Ph o8 


<£> 


CO 


CO 


<o 


t^ 


t^ 


C5 


OS 


t^ 


t^. 


t>. 


t>. 


t^ 




6 

g 


o 


o 


O 






























o3 

Q 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 






u» 


O 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 






OS 




CO 


o 


t~ 


"J 


CO 


o 


t~ 


UO 


© 


© 


t^ 


































h3 








•<*< 


*c 


ctT 


CO 


CO 


1>. 


"* 


00 


CO 


CM 


00 


CO 








t_i 


«o 


t^ 


C5 


00 


y—> 


•«*< 


CO 


CM 


CM 


CM 


1-H 


© 


CM 










CB 


CO 


CO 


eo 


CO 


-<5H 


■* 


"5 


iO 


T* 


TSH 


■* 


■«* 


■* 










Ph 




































08 




































tM "£ 


«o 


oo 


oo 


oo 


i-H 


CO 


CO 


CO 


oo 


OS 


r» 


oo 


CO 










«"'& 


■>* 


Tt< 


T»< 


TH 


«5 


»o 


f^ 


CO 


iO 


•"J* 


TjH 


■># 


»o 




H 




02 


Ph cs 






























o 

a 


o 


1 

o 


o 






























>- 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


© 


o 


s 


o 


o 


© 


8 


© 




n 


00 


< 


03 

Q 


o 


o 


,o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 








iO 


o 


■"1 


OS 


t^ 


CO 


00 


o 


US 


t^ 


t^ 


oo 




w 




CO 


CO 


■* 


iC 


o 


o 


00 


o 


o 


© 


CM 


^ 


■^ - 










Ph 


o 


CM 


CM 


CM 


>o 


o 


tP 


OS 


CM 


■* 


CM 


■*# 


t>. 










V 


"*l 


■* 


"<* 


■* 


■^ 


UO 


CO 


"5 


»o 


■^ 


■* 


■* 


■* 










Ph 




































o3 




































u •*» 


o 


CO 


C3J 


o 


CO 


OS 


^-1 


CO 


CM 


Tj* 


•«tl 


CO 


OS 




a 




03 


Ph o3 


to 


CO 


>c 


CO 


CO 


CO 


t~ 


I>. 


oo 


t^ 


t» 


t^ 


CO 




■5 

a 


© 

s 


O 

is 


O 




























































fe 




3 


>, 


o 


o 


o 


Q 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


©1 


© 


© 


o 




o 

H 


t^" 


< 


08 

Q 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


§ 


o 


o 


© 


© 


o 


© 






Tj< 


CO 


OS 


CM 


-tfl 




lO 


r^ 


CM 


"0 


© 


CO 


































OQ 






t^. 


CO 


o 


£•- 


CM 




00 


■* 


o 


© 


CO 


t-T 












F* 


»c 


o 


lO 


»o 


o 


CO 


■>CH 


CO 


CO 


CO 


r-» 


oo 


CO 










0) 


-* 


»o 


■^ 


■^1 


lO 


to 


lO 


*a 


CO 


»« 


"5 


m 


"0 










Ph 




































« 




























■ 








i 









































































g 


























03 




a 
































e 

>> 




g 

■a 

>- 

o 

>> 
a 

O 


a 

_o 
'•+3 

ft 

O 






b 

03 

3 

d 

c3 


r? 

03 

s 

h 


c 

03 


ft 

< 


03 


a 

3 

•-9 


»-9 


-t-j" 

CO 

3 
W) 

3 

< 


B 

<x> 

ft 
a> 


o 

o 


u 

CD 

g 

► 

o 


a> 

s 

Q 


u 
o 





No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



183 



g 
e 



© 



g 

-S3 



CO 

g 

© 

so 

•1§ 



CO 



O 



<30 



co~ 

g 

©i 

s 
e 

5Q 



ft 



Qi 
^ 



g s, 



g t © 

"8 ^S 



©" g 

g -S 



o 



g 

g 

© 



SQ 



co 
© 

g 

Oh 



6 

w 

< 







o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


CO 






o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


©i 


© 


© 


© 


© 


CM 








o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


t>. 


































CM 




us 

e 
en 


00 


id 


© 


O0 


Tt< 




© 


00 


CO 




CO 


CD 




ID 


T-H 




1^ 


© 


t~ 


© 


© 


•* 


CD 


ID 


© 


© 


© 


© 


l^ 


ID 






00 


ID 


00 


oo 


00 


■* 


t^. 




1-H 


CO 


© 


CO 


© 


OS 






iH 




































© 


© 


© 




»D 


i>T 


>* 


1H 


© 


00 


CD 


CM 












CO 


-* 


CM 




^H 


i— i 


CNI 


CNI 


CM 




1— 1 


CM 


CM 










o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


o 


OS 






o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


CO 








o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


00 


ID 




O 

en 






























CM 






CM 


-* 


00 


ID 


© 


"* 


CO 


00 


© 


-*l 


© 


-* 


t>. 






!>. 


CM 


CO 


00 




© 


00 


CO 


O0 


OS 


>D 


1— 1 


i-H 


CO 






t~ 


CM 


CO 


CO 


t^ 


CM 


»D 


O0 




CM_ 


© 




1— 1 


OS 










































t^ 


CO 


CO 


00 




.— 1 


CO 


CNI 


"*1 


CO 


00 


ID 


OO 










CO 


■* 


CNI 


© 












© 


© 


CM 












© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


ID 






o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


CM 








o 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


00 


© 




CO 

e 

T-l 


































CO 


oo 


t- 


OS 


© 


© 


CNI 


© 


CNI 


CM 


t^ 




t^. 


CM 






I--. 


CM 


t^ 


t^. 


oo 


OS 


CO 


t^ 


t^ 


© 


b» 


CM 


t^- 


CM 






rH 


t~ 


OS 




ID 


ID 


ID 


ID 


t^ 


co 


-* 


t^ 


CM 


OS 








































ID 


CM 




t^ 


1— 1 


ID 


t^ 


CO 


© 


CO 


CO 


•* 


© 










CNI 


CM 


tH 


© 




© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 














o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 






© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


00 








o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


t^ 






o 
en 

iH 






























CM 




ID 


CO 




CO 


cnT 


cnT 


© 


ID 


CM 


© 


>D 


•"* 


ID 


t^ 




CO 


CO 


CD 


ID 


OS 


© 


■* 


-* 


ID 


CD 


t~ 


CO 


■* 


© 






-^ 


<M 


-* 




CD 


© 


CO 


© 


t^ 


>D 




■^ 


CO 


© 








































00 


t~ 


oo 


CO 


© 


© 


00 


r~T 


t^ 


CO 


ID 


ID 


© 














© 


© 


© 




© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


CM 










* 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


CM 






o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


-* 








o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


b- 


l>^ 




1-1 

e 
en 

i-t 


































ID 


t*. 


© 


t^ 


t^ 


© 


»D 


>D 


CO 


OS 


-* 


00 


ID 


CM 






t~ 


© 


© 




CO 


CNI 


© 


VH 


© 


00 


CM 


CD 


■* 


© 






CM 


Tft 


ID 


CO 


>D 


"^1 


© 


OO 




CO 


CO 


CM 


© 


oo 








































T-H 


t^ 


ID 


CO 


ID 


CO 


© 


CM 


CM 


CO 




CO 


■* 










1— 1 




© 


© 


OS 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 




© 










1-1 


r" 1 


*-' 






*~! 


* H 


i— 1 


y— 1 


*-* 


^ 


»— 1 


tH 










o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


t^ 






o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 








o 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


t~ 






e . 

iH 


































id 


id 


CO 


t~ 


© 




© 


t^ 


CM 


oo 


00 


"■* 


© 


b~ 






ID 


■* 


ID 


© 


00 


oo 


00 






>D 


"<*< 


-* 


ID 


t^. 






© 


© 


t^ 


T| i 


t^ 


»D 


t~ 


t~- 


© 


CO 


CD 


oo 


© 


00 








































© 


oo 


^- 


OS 


b- 


00 


lr^ 


CM 


CO 


oo 


CO 


t^ 


00 










o 


©1 


© 


00 


00 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 










1— 1 












T-H 






















o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


l--- 






o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


ID 


© 






© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


CN 




00 
































cm 


tH 


© 




00 






CM 


00 


© 


OS 


© 




ID 






■>* 


id 


© 


© 


■<*< 


© 


(M 


tr~ 


r^ 


O0 




-# 




ID 






• ** 


■* 


<M 


■>* 


"# 


CD 


O0 


© 


■* 


>D 


f^ 


OO 


T— 1 


00 










































CO 


CO 


© 


© 


OS 


t^ 


CO 


CM 




© 


CO 


ID 


CM 










© 


© 


© 


00 


00 


OS 


OS 


© 


© 


00 


00 


00 


© 










© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


■>* 






© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 








© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


t^ 


© 




00 






























© 




en 


© 


ID 


oo 


-* 


t^ 


CO 


00 


00 


CD 


© 


*■» 


ID 




CM 




oo 


00 


t^ 


© 


t^ 


t^ 


© 


CNI 


»D 


© 


t^ 


t^ 


ID 


ID 


CO 






ih 


oo 


■* 


■* 


»D 


CD 


"■* 


CNI 


ID 


CM 


t~ 


1-H 


CO 


CD 


00 










































CO 


t-T 


>D 


CD 




CO 


00 


lr^ 


oo 


1-H 


00 


© 


CO 










00 


00 


OO 


t^ 


l>- 


00 


00 


oo 


00 


OO 


t^ 


00 


00 










o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


tV 






o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


•>*< 






t- 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


CO 


OS 
































© 




en 


CO 


t>r 




-* 


CNI 


CNI 


ID 


CO 


CO 




CM 


1j* 


CO 


© 




00 


CO 


© 


ID 




t-~ 


»D 


CM 


© 


OS 


»D 


© 


© 


© 








1-1 


CO 


OS. 


t~ 


OS 


t~ 


•© 


»D 




CM 


ID 


t^ 


ID 


1^ 


00 










































US 


CO 


<N 


OS 


© 


lr^ 


ID 


TJH 


•>CH 


OS 


CM 


CO 


© 










OO 


oo 


oo 


t^ 


t» 


t^ 


00 


oo 


00 


t"- 


t^ 


t^ 


00 










o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


ID 






o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


00 








© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


00 


OS 




(0 






























© 




en 


CD 






OS 


<M 


© 


© 


t^ 


© 


CM 


CO 


© 


© 


t^ 




00 


•* 


CM 


1-H 


(N 


© 


CO 


© 


CO 


CD 


© 


CO 


-* 


CD 


00 






1-1 


© 


© 




ID 


■* 


© 


© 


ID 




t~ 


© 


-# 


CO 


t^ 










































CM 


t^ 


© 


t^ 


CO 


t*. 


© 


00 


"# 




-H 


© 


00 










00 


00 


00 


J^ 


r~ 


t» 


00 


t^ 


t-- 


t>- 


t^ 


t~ 


b- 










o 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


00 






© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


CO 








© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


-* 


© 




IO 






























© 




en 


ID 


ID 


CO 


© 


rtn 


ID 


t^ 


CO 


■>* 


OO 




CO 


© 


ID 




00 


<M 


t- 


■<* 


© 


© 


© 


© 


CO 


CM 


CM 


oo 


•* 


© 


CD 






i-i 


© 


CO 


»D 


© 


i—i 


OS 


CO 


CM 


t~ 


© 


00 


■* 


t£ 


t^ 










































00 


© 


© 


CNI 


»D 


© 


© 


CM 


CO 


r~ 


s 


© 


OS 










CO 


00 


CD 


© 


© 


© 


CO 


r~ 


t~ 


© 


t~ 


© 










o 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


00 






o 


o 


© 




© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


CM 








© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


t^ 


t^ 




^ 






























00 




en 


CO 


«# 


© 


ID 


© 


OS 


(M 


kD 


b~ 


»D 




00 


CM 


■** 




oo 


© 


">*l 






!>. 


CNI 


•* 


© 


CO 


CO 


CO 


© 


00 


Tt< 






*H 


ID 


© 


t^ 


t-- 


CO 


CO 


© 


© 




t^. 


CM 




CO 


t~- 










































t>r 


oo 


CNI 


t^. 


© 


00 


CO 


b- 


t^ 


CM 


CM 


ID 


ID 










CO 


© 


© 


ID 


CO 


© 


t^ 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 










o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


•>*< 






© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


OO 








© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 








CO 






























© 




en 


OS 


© 


00 


OS 


ID 


"# 


CO 


CO 


"*< 


© 


■*£ 


© 


ID 


■* 




oo 


o 


© 


CO 


© 


CNI 


r>- 


■* 


00 


»D 


t^ 


o 


© 


CD 


CM 






r-t 


CM 


OS 


CD 


CO 


© 


CO 


CO 


© 


© 


r^ 


CM 


t^. 




b- 










































"5 




t~ 


<M 




CO 


OS 


CO 


-* 


CO 




© 


© 










t- 


r— 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


CD 








n 

H 
5 
O 


>> 
u 

3 

a 

eS 

1-9 


03 

3 

o 


a 


ft 
< 




a 






3 
< 


s 

•t-s 

o. 

01 

02 


C 
Si 

o 

■** 

o 

O 


CO 

> 
O 

55 


i-T 

a 

0> 

a 

Q 


fafi 

ea 
u 

0) 

> 
< 


a 
.2 


C3 
•*» 

'ft 
ea 
u 

Ih 





184 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



73 
73 

o 

a 
o 

U 



no 



IS- 5 

&o a 
£ 2 

° s 

CO 

co 

e 






6 

k < 

H 

« 
H 



§ 



O T-( ^H 



rH t-( O 



OS -H rt 



TJ4 ^H ,-H 



T-< CM ^H 



s s 



<M ~H *-. 



l— « i— l »— ( O i— l 



1-1 OS 0> 



i-h ^h ~* CM 



-H ^H 1-H ,-1 CM 



i-H »-. O 



uo 


CO 


CN 


»o 


«3 


OS 


o 


*— * 


CO 


o> 


s 


CO 






r~ 


CO 


-* 


CO 


o 


t-~ 


CO 


00 


-* 


CO 


CO 


«5 


lO 


Ol 


l~-. 


00 


CO 


CO 




t~ 


t~ 


o 


OS 


CO 


t^. 


00 


o 






























co 


o 


CO 


>o 


CO 


»o 


CO 


1-H 


00 


"5 




»o 


CM 


1-H 


CO 


CO 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 




*-H 


i-h 




CM 





O i— i i—i -st 1 



CO T-H 1-1 t^. 

OS »0 tf5 CM 

O t-^ O CO 

l-H ■* -^ OS 

CO CM CM i-H 



00 CM ^H 



» -r ® 



t-< CO ^ 



^H t^ ^5 






oj 

a 

"-9 



o9 



ft 

< 



G 



3 
M 



S 



05 



i 

► 

O 



HI 


a 


> 


3 




03 








> 


7j 


ft 
03 
O 




ft 


Ih 




o 


01 




ft. 


ft. 



II) 


ro 


G 


G 





bfi 


o 


G 




72 


o 


7J 


cS 


o 
c 


-G 


5 


-t-S 


+s 


,G 






^d 


£ 


+j 




>*-c 


S-i 


o 


<1> 




-G 


G 


-4J 









o 
-►J 


o 

CD 

go 


CO 


7^ 


CI 


c3 


ri 


s 


fe 


03 


IB 


G 


C3 


03 


H 


on 


n 


M 













£ 




G 


U 


c3 


o 




s 





3 


a 


G 


o 


a> 


E 






m 


cu 


c 


a 


o 


o 
-G 




■♦-> 


C 


a 


Bj 


o 


CO 


h 


9! 




+» 


T3 

CD 


o 


;G 


CJ 


ft 


,4 


ft 


+J 


G 


G 


co 


•i-i 


G 


T3 


<1; 


a 




y 


o 


00 

G 


G 


o 


n 


o 
u 


J 


CD 


+- 


+J 


T 


99 

ft 


ja 




-*j 


<D 


o 


-G 




-♦-> 


+a 


DO 


pa 


T3 


G 


3 




G 


efl 


O 


fc* 


2 


G 

C3 






IS 


ft 


H 


(J 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



185 



o 



v. 

50 



(^ 






-si 









6 
< 



o 
s 



H O . 
Q C O 

M > W 

aw ^ 



•ssaupj^jj 



•auiio^qQ 



papuadsng 



•paAiossiQ 



•pnoj, 



•88IJ 



uo sso^ 



•pnox 



cooooooooooonotoow^w 

0.—.0— <^HT-H^i-M*-<,-l~Hi-li-I^Hl-<T-f,-l 
tOOONffilOtDcOOtOO)QOlO«OOONO>00 

IMCOTtlOOtO^OOOOOOO'UlNfOlNCOtOOO 

HHONHHOHHHHhM«OHO 

ooooooooooooooooo 
ooooooooooooooooo 

©(OlMtOOOtOWOOOOWNOOlDOOO 
GOOOO-*(NCIVO>tJ<(N(MONOOOCOO 
OOHT- 1 i-H i— I O O ■— I i-H i-H i-H © O T-c i— IH 

ooooooooocsooooooo 

OOCN|0-*J<Ttl©©00©e'^CNlTSH'*IOOcOOaO 

OOOWO"*OOOM^hh-1<0*0 

ooooooooooooooooo 

NINN(M'>#tO(NtDO'*OCOOOOO(Nrf(00 
000000000000000(00 

ooooooooooooooooo 

OKjiooooiomooio »o 
oeoooiortooofflooo cq 

I • I I I I 

-H i-H rt t-H ^* ,— O <~l ^H ^H T-H CM 

I0©00©l0ia©©©iai0»0»n CO 
WtDCO-^OOOiTtlOOOOMffllOt- © »o 

CN> CO CO CO CO CO CO CO CO CN) •* -<*l ■* CM coco 



2 

"3 

o 



03 03 03* 03 03* 03 - 03' 03* 03* 03 03 )j^ g 03* 03* -^ 

O3c3coo3cjo3iso3c3cso3o3j ) . 60 03 cs g> 
03 03 03 O3030303030303030303tro303fl3 
bO bf; bfi bfi bD bfi bfi bfi 60 bO M 60 i> •* 6fi 6C > 
O3O3O3O3O3030303O303O3O3 >->_ 03 03 

"^ -r-1 .rH .rt .*H .f-1 .1-1 .1-1 .^H • p-H • >-H • p* M ~ t CQ • p-H • rH 

c3cococ3c3coc3o3coc3coc3 *V? ^ ^ 



•°"2 

co ca 

03 03 

60 6JD 

03 03 

> > 



03 03 03 03 03 

03* 03 03 03 03 03 03 03 S -5 03 ^ -^ -5 

1— 1 •— J -— 1 1— 1 "Tj •— 1 ■— < 1— 1 CO 03 _ ( CO CO 53 

is aa** -sis'* ®a« &£,£. 

-(j+j-u-M-w+i+j+j oOhO^^ ofi 60 6fi 
O3O3Q303fl303O3fl3 a> O3©0303O3 
bfi bfi bO bl) bfi 60 bO 60 > > 60 > i> > 
03O3O303O3O303O3. 03 



. . o 



aj +i +i +5 -tJ +3 . 



.S.5.5.S.5.S S.2^^2 c^^c^ 

c303CO"coc3c303C3 • . cO 



•p-repti^g 
xnnui^. , B[ < j 



•^uaunpag 



•^ipiqinx 



lOCMiaO'^lOTtlOOOOlO©»OCOCO'-<'— l<N 
■+i " +J +j -(J +i +J +J 

J3 -Q J3 -C J3 -C X 

■ 61) +J +J ,+J +j* -4j' +i +j _^ -|J 61) 6fi 6fi 60 6fi 60 
03 *£2j *-* r* _fi (~< r~ f r~j J2 _C ^ ■—- ^2 j^3 1-^h f« ^2 

o M 2 1 5P.SP.SP SP.SP.SP SP^S 1 ^ °° m °° M M 



•SPo3-^ C 



ixx 



.X 



6fi 60 • 
03 03 -S "H 03 



•UOI^D9I[OQ JO a^BQ 



'jaquin^; 



OlcONM^rtlfl^JINNISrHOOCOfONrt 
CM i-H i-C i-H r-l CN i-r CN| ^H 



> > 






■*OH(M0500M'*ISO)N>Cn<XOW 
t^-»00«0>— (OOCO'— I (Mi— lllJSiSNOO'* 
1— llft05CN)Ttl'!*<t~-C35CO«00>CO>OO^tl|^00 
U5lOK5CDtOtOCOCCNNNOOOOOO!CnOl 
CO CO CO CO CO CO CO CO CO CO CO CO CO CO CO CO CO 



186 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



03 



>0 






fe 3 









o 
6 

H 
< 






o 

§ 
s 
<1 



M 

c 
a 
O 



•ssaupiBjj 



— O -H 



CO .-I ~H 



•anuo^qQ co co cn eo 



papuadsng 



p8A[OSSIQ 



•p3*OL 



•aaj^ 



.-I — •*< 



H O . 


i= 53 * 


a < o 


tH > l-C 


COM H 


tf g« 


o 



■uoi^iuSj 

UO SSO^J 



•p3;0X 



-H CM H 1-H 



s 





o 



oa 



,a 



C 

C 
03 



o3 
© 
© 

>1 



C3 

M 

© 
> 






a 
'3 



fe 



S c 2 

03 * o3 



- ._ co ._ 



a 
'3 



03 
-t-s 

bfi 

© 

'3 



CO 

a 
"3 



> > 



03 



03 

+3 

CD 
bl) 
© 
> 

a 

'3 



o3 



bD 

CD 

> 

a 
'3 



03 
© 

© 



bD 

© 

a 
'3 



~© 
bfi 
© 
> 



03 

© 
bC 

© 

a 
'3 



oa 



a 

Cos o3 



> > 



•pj^pUB^g 



•^uauiipag 



•X^ipiqanx 



-a 

bfl 



-a 

bfi 



!> > co 



bfi 



bfi 



tC l/J t« E HO >• > 



OQ 



bfi 



M ffl 03 03 



-a 

bfi 

13 a 
o 

> £ 



•uoipanoQ JO 8^Q 



•aaquin^ 



a 

•-9 



cS 

s 



a 



03 



bC 

a 
<1 



a 
© 

GO 



Q 



o 


CO 


eo 


_ 


"5 


^ 


co 


eo 


o 


o 


CS 




TfH 


00 


1 


lO 


oo 


CO 


t-» 


o 


o 




O 


> 




»o 


CM 


■^ 


OS 


CO 


CJ 


CO 


•0 


00 


< 


iO 


»o 


m 


CO 


SO 


to 


l~- 


!>. 


00 


CS 


CS 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


eo 


CO 


eo 





No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



187 



© 

o 
■*o 

© 

a*, 
••o 

© 



© 
© 

so 



© 

so 

© 



C3 

f~o 

© 



© 

O 



o 

CO 

6 

PQ 

< 



•ssaupjejj 



•auijo^qo 



CO CC i-t 



O 
S 

a 

< 



papuadsng 



•paApssTQ 



"IWL 



•aajj 



O T-. i-H i-H 






c>q CN i-i 



1-1 C» ^H 



« . 


t> h fc 


^ o 

M ►> HI 


COM H 


tf fcPS. 


O 



•uoi^iuSj 

uo ssoq; 



"IB^ox 



« 

o 

Q 
O 



o 
K 



>> 




3 


















cc 




d 




fc! 






















05 








CD 






c 


6 




(-1 
CD 


a 


0> 


CD 


CD 


03 


6 




CO 


X> 


CO 


rU 


s 


XI 


X 


X> 


+s 


£i 




CD 


03 


03 


a 




03 


<d 


ert 




03 






CD 


d 












>. 


el 


0) 




d 


CD 


CD 


cd 


CD 


CD 


hi) 


ft 


w 




UO 


bD 


bn 


> 


bn 


^3 


a> 


C 


1 


o 


CD 


CD 


CD 




CD 


CO 


d 


> 


c 


o 


> 


> 


> 


>) 


> 


cC 


>> 


>> 


>> 


>> 


>> 


>> 


>> 


c 


>> 


>> 
























■4S 




+3 




*s 


+3 


-f^ 






-U 


£} 


c 


c 


C 


+= 


c 


C 


C 


<M 


C 


d 






















03 


c3 


03 


eS 


Q 


o3 


03 


03 




Bt 


03 


l*i 


fa 


fa 


fa 


fa 


fa 


fa 


> 


fa 


fa 


>> 




o 


















,C 




B 


















«C 




B 

CD 


















+= 




d 
















■*3 


a 

o3 


0) 


u 












6 


O 


c 

03 


CO 

o3 

CD 

'ft 

C 


X! 
o3 

-*> 

CD 
bfl 
cd 


C 
o3 

CO 

03 
CD 


CD 

a 

d 


CD 

a 


CD 
03 


03 
+-> 
CD 


CD 
03 


o3 

-t-> 

CD 
bfi 

CD 


X! 
03 

-4-= 

CD 
b£ 
CD 


CO 

03 
CD 

IS. 
G 


d 


> 


ft 


U 


o 


bO 


bfi 


bfi 


>• 


> 


C 


>> 


>f 


C 

d 


d 


5) 
c 


CD 

> 


CD 


CD 
> 


>> 


>> 


^ 


+3 

c 


fl 


>> 


>> 


>> 


>> 


>> 


>> 


+3 


C 


d 


03 


03 


c 


c 




+3 
C 


c 




03 

<4H 


03 


03 






03 


01 


03 


o3 


03 


03 








> 


> 


fa 


fa 


fa 


fa 


fa 


fa 


> 


> 


> 



•pjepuB^g 



•^uauiipag 



•A^ipTqanx 



»-Hi-IOOt-I1-Hi-I»-H 



> > 



_bl) ^i 

^ Hi) 



CO 



CO CO GO CO 



^ 8-d 
T5.S bC 

'^^^ 
Co M 

O > 



ED SI ^ 



XI 



>> CO CO CO CO 



^ CO 



c 
.S? o 



CO 



•UOT^OajIOQ JO 8^Q 



•jaqtun^j 



fa S 



a 

<3 



3 

^ 



W) 



»c 


-* 


,_, 


CO 


»« 


CO 


■«n 


CNl 


'tl 


its 


•* 




«o 


CO 


"5 


t--. 


"5 


00 


<M 




CM 


CO 


o 


> 




*o 


00 


CM 


W5 


o> 


■* 


o 


CO 


id 


OO 


<3 


IO 


lO 


iO 


■as 


to 


co 


r- 


oo 


oo 


OS 


C5 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 





188 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



1-3 






e 3 

H ft 






CO 

6 

n 
< 









co 


>o 


Ifl 


CO 


^ H 


,_, 


,_ 




CO 


© 


^_, 


•^ 








•ssaupiBfj 
































CM 


CM 


CN 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CO 


CO 


CM 








>* 


"■*< 


">* 


00 


o 


o 


00 


O 


© 


o 


CO 








•auiJojqQ 


t^ 


t^ 


t^ 


CO 


t~ 


t^ 


CO 


t^ 


t^ 


t>- 


t^ 


t>. 










00 


-* 


CO 


00 


o 


o 


CO 


Tj< 


oo 


00 


00 


t^ 




Q 



.papuadsng 


"5 

o 
o 


in 

© 
o 


CM 

o 
o 


o 
o 


o 
o 


o 

o 


o 

o 
o 


CO 

o 

O 


© 
© 


CO 

© 
© 


CO 

© 
© 


© 
© 




">* 


CO 


© 


00 


■«* 


00 


CM 


CM 


Tt< 


CO 


T»< 


CM 






CO 


00 


o 


r^ 


o 


CO 


00 


■* 


00 


© 


© 


© 


O 


a 
p 

A 


•paApsstQ 


o 


© 


CM 

o 


o 


CM 

o 


o 


o 


CM 

o 


© 


© 


CM 

© 


© 






























CM 


o 


CO 


CO 


M< 


00 


OO 


CO 


CM 


■<*< 


CM 


OS 


a 




cm 


-*< 


CM 


CM 


t^. 


o 


oo 


o 


CO 


co 


-* 


CO 


< 




•pnoj, 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 




CO 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 




o 


o 


© 


o 


o 


o 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 






CO 


o 


Tj* 


CO 


oo 


CM 


CM 


CM 


00 


CM 


O0 


t>. 








t>. 


CO 


»o 


CO 


o 


CM 


CM 


CM 


© 


CO 


t^ 


^t< 






*39Jj[ 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


O 


o 


© 


© 




© 


© 






o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


H ? ^ 


uoi^iu3i 


o 


© 




o 

CM 


co 




o 

o 








CO 


© 


f > * 
8 > 2 




no ssot; 


T-> 


CM 


CM 


CM 


rt 


_; 


-H 


CM 


1 


1 


CM 


CM 






























corv] H 






© 


© 


»o 


m 


iO 


o 


o 


© 


»o 




«3 


© 


Ph g* 




•pno£ 


CO 


o 


CO 


o> 


CO 


CO 


*"I 


CM 


l^ 


1 


© 


"0 


O 






CO 


b- 


CO 


MS 


CO 


CO 


CO 


t^ 


© 




CO 


© 






















>> 




1 

CD 
CD 


1 

G 


























J3 




3 


























h 




ts 




























03 




CQ 


73 


























s 




73 

G 

CD 


G 
03 














1 










■(J 


T3 
03 


CD* 


o 

2 










• 


CD 


a> 


a> 


0> 


0> 


a 


CD 


£> 


XI 


03 








































tn 


Xi 


CD 


Xi 


X> 


£> 


JD 


CQ 


J2 


-t^> 


+j 


CD 










o3 


03 


03 


03 


03 


03 


03 


CD 


CD 


bfl 












+i 


CD 

> 


-u 


-u 


-t-> 








bfl 


bli 














a> 


CD 


cu 


0> 


01 


a 


CD 


CD 


CD 


> 












bfi 


bfl 


M 


bO 


bll 


bO 


> 


> 














0) 


>> 


© 


a> 


£> 


as 


- a 


CD 






£ts 












> 


> 




> 


> 


? 


> 


>1 


>> 












+3 


(3 


>> 


>> 


>> 


>> 




>> 

-t-> 




G 


gS 












G 


+3 


G 


a 


a 


fl 


G 


a 


03 


o3^:> 
































2 . a 












c3 




03 


03 


03 


ert 


crt 


03 










K 

O 
Q 

o 






ft 


Q 


ft 


fe 


ft 


ft 


ft 


ft 


> 


> 


> 
























>> 

^3 




CD 


G 


























CQ 




CD 


3 


























ort 

s 




Is 

TJ 


G 


























Tl 




G 














aj 












+i 


03 


CD* 


03 
CD 


J2 










TJ* 


Xi 
03 


o 


CD 


0) 


a> 


CD 


a 

03 


CD 


o3 


Xi 

03 


03 














,0 


-O 


^O 


X> 


£> 


m 


J2 


+J 
















OS 


03 


ert 


03 


ert 


03 


03 


CD 














o 


CD 


CD 


-t-> 
CD 


OJ 


+J 

e 


CD 


a 


CD 


bfl 
CD 


bfl 


CD' 
> 












> 


bfl 


bA 


Ul 


bfi 


bl) 


bfl 


> 


> 














CD 


0) 


3 


OJ 


CD 


a 


CD 
















>> 


> 


> 


> 


> 


> 


3 


> 


>> 


>> 


^C 












a 


>> 


>> 


>> 


>> 


.>> 


>> 


>> 




G 


G cc 














-|J 


+J 


-t-j 


-*j 


+J 




-i-J 




.•^ 03 












o3 





a 


C! 


a 


fl 


a 


a 


03 


3^3J 














































03 


03 


c3 


03 


03 


03 


03 - 






a . a 












> 


fe 


ft 


IX 


ft 


ft 


ft 


ft 


> 


> 


> 








K 
O 


•pj^pUB^g 


O 
CM 


O 
CM 


CM 


CO 
CM 


CM 
CM 


o 

CM 


CM 


«o 


m 


© 

CM 


© 


© 
CM 




O 

o 


uinui^u 






























-*j 


-t-i 




1 










+J 


-t^ 


43 










rC 


J 




a> 










J3 


J3 


^G 










bfl 


bA 




'0 


2^ 








bfl 


bl) 


bfl 






« 




•^uauiipag 






J3 


CO - 


J5 


J3 


,C 
















CO 




bO 


e* tj 


bl) 


be 


bfi 












































B 

CM 

pM 

<1 






> 


> 


CO 





CQ 


CC 


CO 


CO 


> 


> 


> 












•n 














•*-> 


+i 


+» 












^3 


Xi 














h3 


-G 


-G 










•^^ipiqinx 


.5? 


<*9 


,G 
6C 






CD 

c 

O 


to 


bfl 


*OT 




bfl 












> 


> 


cc 


02 


CQ 


£ 


CO 


CO 


> 


> 


> 












00 


o 


co 


CM 


- 


■>* 


»o 


CO 


-* 


OS 


t^- 






*UOI 


;oai 


OQ jo a^Q 


G 
03 


CD 


u 

03 




>> 
03 


0) 




bfl 

< 


a 

CD 
CO 


> 

o 


CD 














CM 


S 


CM 


C3J 


CM 


CO 


o 


t>- 


00 


t^~ 


00 










CO 


r^. 


CO 


00 


05 


I~- 


a> 


"5 


o 


o> 


> 
< 






•jaqran^ 


»o 




00 


CM 

CO 


co 


00 
co 


co 


oo 


CM 

00 


CO 

OS 


© 








CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


co 


CO 


CO 


CO 







No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



189 



o 

so 
© 



© 

<» 
©• 

OS 



Si, 



co 
© 

©■ 



©• 
© 

<» 



co 
6 

H 
< 



•seaupaBH 



•auuo|qo 



papuedsng 



•paAjossiQ 



*I B »°X 



•881^ 



CO OJ i— I 



to cn co oo or> 

T— i 1-H 1— t ^ CO 



i-H ~H CM 



« o . 


P 2) fc 


S22 


aw^ 


«5« 


o 



uo ssoq; 



Ts^ox 



« 
C 
Q 

o 



£ 



2 






CO K*> IT 






T3 
Pi 
o3 



<3 



"S 

M 

o> 
> 









fe Q 



<3 



CI 

•a ® 
^ o 



^3 



T3 

a 
c3 



> 



.a 

bfi 

> 



^ +s -+J +2 

~ a a a 

-fJ .rH .rt .rt 



a 
'3 



> > > 



« 

a 

Oh 
Ph 



■pj^pUB^g 



'^uauitpag 



•^;tpiqjn,x 



l«T},©COGOtf5i— It-IUS 



J3 
bfi 



.^ 0) .S" 



> 02 02 02 >■ 



"m a 
o 



-a 



^3 



02 02 02 i> ►> > 



•uox^oanoo JO e^BQ 



•aaqranjsj 



<5 



t^ 


»o 


OS 


Oi 


t^ 


CO 


co 


-* 




uo 


CO 


t^ 


lO 


CO 


Tt, 


CO 


co 


> 


o 


lO 


CO 


■* 


CO 


<M 


CM 


t>- 


,< 


lO 


>« 


"0 


co 


co 


CO 


C5 


o 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


1 



190 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 






CO 

.AS 






© 
Si. 
o 



05 



cc 
O 



05 d 



co 
.© 



e 

H 
^ 



co 

05 

©S 

05 



CO 
CO 

6 

n 
< 



•ssaupj'Bjj 


0100>HO'*0)'Hrt(NNN'*N-iOeOCi5'<)<M'<l<NMMNM1<M 




•auuo[q3 


eoc^<^c^c^t>.foc^eocococoTt<Tj<->^TticocoTt<Ttit^.t^-cocccocococo 


<M <M 


3 

o 

a 
s 


Q 

H 

o 

a 

<< 


•papuadsng 


C^ i— c i-H -h © U9 — <T-lCMCN!CO-^<T-.CO»OCO->*iTtleOTtlt-~CN)CS<MCS|—c^-l 

oooooo o o o o o o o o o o o o © o © o © o o oo 
oooooo o o o o © o o © o o o oo o o o o o o © o 




•paApssiQ 


^knmoO'* <m eo co cni co — ' © oo co cm © to <ni © © co cs co <m <m © 

rt _ _h _ ,h e^j HHrtrt^MNHMNHlNNHINnHHrtrtH 
©©o©©© ©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©© 




•IB^ox 


t^ lO C<I CO 00 «0 i— i-HMiCiOM^O^INTltiONOCOO- iMNOONtO 
©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©© 




•93IJ 


c^i-incj^i— ie^<^coTt<coc>q^c^cococ^(:o^^'*t^-cNicsii-Hi— ii— i© 
©©©©©CM©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©^©©©©©© 

©©©©©^H©© ©©©©©© ©©©©©©©©©©©©©© 




o 2 

OS > 


•uoptuSi 

uo ssot; 


CO 00 T* Tf< © t~- i— ( CO OO CO <M "# *# CO © CM CO © Tj< i—l © t->- ■** © CO OO — I 
UO T*< -^ CO CO © N<OCi5iJc*005i-iCON(NN0050e<5'*MU550lO 




■p*»oX 


^00i-nO<NC0©C<l©t^-<t<©©rt"**O>O©00C0©C^U0''*i00©"0© 
iJiN«5U5©OsONrt05OO«N0)ei0005-iWW5«5050000IMiJ(iH 


-<*IC0C0C0C0t^CCi-*'*C0'«J<rt<©'*litlcCi-<tC'#©lOCC>l-~C0C0C0TflTt<^ 
i— 1 ^H 


o 
o 
U 


•pJBpU'BIg 

UITIUIXBLJ 


MOffli*NeslMOMN«5N'-<ia<N^O(NM(NO'HNNOOW«5 

*MeqHH^rtWHl-IHHM!0»e<5tO!6M»N'OHHHiHi-IH 


i-H 1—1 


T3 

cu 
a 
® 

o 

en 

o> 

is 

a ■ 

03 
CO 








+j +i +> -*j +j 

G G G G G 

S S C G G ,£. _c; j- ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ js ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^3 ^ ^ J5 ^ ^ j ^3 ^< 

.i.i.rt.r—.-H+^+ J -f^+^-t-'-t^ > -^'+^-^-t^+ J + J +- > -* J -t J -*-'+ J -* J + J + ;> +- , -* i -* J 

GGGflrtCGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGG 
« SS m S 00000000000000000000000 


Locality. 




• 




Quinepoxet River, Holden, l . 
Stillwater River, Sterling, 2 
Wachusett Reservoir, West Boylston, 2 . 
Wachusett Reservoir, Clinton, surface, 3 
Wachusett Reservoir, Clinton, bottom, 1 
Marlborough (Walker's Brook), 4 
Marlborough Brook filter beds, effluent, 5 
Wachusett Aqueduct, Southbo rough,* . 
Sudbury Reservoir, surface,* . 
Sudbury Reservoir, bottom,* 
Framingham Reservoir No. 3, inlet,* 
Framingham Reservoir No. 3, near dam,* 
Hopkinton Reservoir, inlet, * . 
Hopkinton Reservoir, surface, * 
Hopkinton Reservoir, bottom, * 
Ashland Reservoir, inlet, * 
Ashland Reservoir, surface,* . 
Ashland Reservoir, bottom,* . 
Framingham Reservoir No. 2, inlet,* 
Framingham Reservoir No. 2, near dam,* 
Lake Cochituate, surface, * 
Lake Cochituate, bottom, 6 
Weston Reservoir, ..... 
Terminal chamber, Sudbury Aqueduct, * 

Spot Pond, * 

Tap in Revere, *..... 

Tap at State House, 5 

Tap in Quincy, * 



03 • 

c, o 

Z ft 



> 

< 



M 


35 


d 




■- 


Q, 


9) 

> 


£ 


< 


s 

00 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



191 



Table No. 34. — Chemical Examinations of Water from a Faucet in Boston, 

from 1892 to 1917. 

[Parts per 100,000.] 













Color. 


Residue on 
Evaporation. 


Ammonia. 


03 
.S 

o 

o 


73 

s 

3 
m 

a 
o 

a 

3 

So 
>> 

X 

O 






-6 

u 
83 

S3 

s 


*3 
o 
H 


3." 
.2 

m 

92 

O 


6 

U 


ALBUMINOID. 




Year. 


o 
H 


T3 

> 
"o 

03 

02 

5 


0) 
H3 

3 
<x> 

a 

09 

3 
W. 


03 

aa 

a> 
3 
T3 
u 
S3 

w 


1892, .... 


.37 


4.70 


1.67 


.0007 


.0168 


.0138 


.0030 


.41 


- 


1.9 


1893, 










.53 


4.54 


1.84 


.0010 


.0174 


.0147 


.0027 


.38 


.60 


1.8 


1894, i 










.58 


4.64 


1.83 


.0006 


.0169 


.0150 


.0019 


.41 


.63 


1.7 


1895, 










.59 


4.90 


2.02 


.0006 


.0197 


.0175 


.0022 


.40 


.69 


0.7 


1896, 










.45 


4.29 


1.67 


.0005 


.0165 


.0142 


.0023 


.37 


.56 


1.4 


1897, 










.55 


4.82 


1.84 


.0009 


.0193 


.0177 


.0016 


.40 


.64 


1.6 


1898, 










.40 


4.19 


1.60 


.0008 


.0152 


.0136 


.0016 


.29 


.44 


1.4 


1899, 










.28 


3.70 


1.30 


.0006 


.0136 


.0122 


.0014 


.24 


.35 


1.1 


1900, 










.29 


3.80 


1.20 


.0012 


.0157 


.0139 


.0018 


.25 


.38 


1.3 


1901, 










.29 


4.43 


1.64 


.0013 


.0158 


.0142 


.0016 


.30 


.42 


1.7 


1902, 










.30 


3.93 


1.56 


.0016 


.0139 


.0119 


.0020 


.29 


.40 


1.3 


1903, 










.29 


3.98 


1.50 


.0013 


.0125 


.0110 


.0015 


.30 


.39 


1.5 


1904, 










.23 


3.93 


1.59 


.0023 


.0139 


.0121 


.0018 


.34 


.37 


1.5 


1905, 










.24 


3.86 


1.59 


.0020 


.0145 


.0124 


.0021 


.35 


.35 


1.4 


1906, 










.24 


3.86 


1.39 


.0018 


.0159 


.0134 


.0025 


.34 


.36 


1.3 


1907, 










.22 


3.83 


1.40 


.0013 


.0129 


.0109 


.0020 


.33 


.32 


1.3 


1908, 










.19 


3.50 


1.35 


.0011 


.0115 


.0092 


.0024 


.33 


.26 


1.2 


1909, 










.18 


3.46 


1.43 


.0011 


.0128 


.0103 


.0025 


.28 


.25 


1.3 


1910, 










.14 


3.05 


1.24 


.0013 


.0118 


.0102 


0016 


.28 


.22 


1.1 


1911, 










.25 


4.18 


1.66 


.0015 


.0156 


.0128 


.0029 


.38 


.33 


1.4 


1912, 










.17 


3.86 


1.23 


.0018 


.0154 


.0119 


.0034 


.36 


.29 


1.7 


1913, 










.13 


3.96 


1.15 


.0014 


.0150 


.0120 


.0026 


.35 


.26 


1.5 


1914, 










.14 


4.12 


1.19 


.0014 


.0138 


.0116 


.0022 


.39 


.25 


1.4 


1915, 










.16 


3.73 


1.04 


.0015 


.0157 


.0134 


.0023 


.38 


.25 


1.4 


1916, 










.18 


4.53 


1.85 


.0013 


.0133 


.0107 


.0026 


.36 


- 


1.4 


1917, 










.15 


4.45 


1.68 


.0015 


.0142 


.0124 


.0018 


.33 


- 


1.3 



192 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



.fe r- 



o 



3 






a 
3 





J as 
3? 






























O 

o 

c3 


©cor—moot-mt>- 


OS 


.— i 


X 


IQ 


* 


r~ 


o 


-r< 


OS 


m 


0O 1 




©OSCO©©CMt---»*< 


r- 


© 


© 


-t- 


"0 


OS 


de 


C?3 


00 


Ol 


■^ 




W as 


©co**t--.-icoco»-i 


CM 


OS 


t~ 


■* 




co 


CO 


■^ 




SO 








9 




-> 
























CQ 




























£tf 






























g OS 






























° s 






























H O 


03 


-^W5OO00i-hOO 


IQ 


CO 


CO 


-H 


r— 


r^ 


CO 


oo 


U0 


tH 


r- 1 




fc > 


-**»^OOin0OCO© , >*< 


r~ 


CO 


— 


OS 


-/ 


"0 


— H 


c-. 


Ol 


00 


■^ 




M as 


© t» © -tJh in CM i— i M 


* 


CO 


to 


Ol 


co 


■* 


LO 


Ol 


CO 


Ol 


CO 




* w 


C 




























0* ao 


3 




























O « 


qq 




























Wtf 






























«B 






























fc P 


c3 


COt— ©-^<©COCO© 


•«$ 


Of) 


a 


CO 


CO 


Ol 


LO 


<# 


h» 


o 


m 1 




-< > 


©m©-*finC<linoO 


c^ 


r- 


OS 


o 


Ol 


OS 


CO 




Ol 


in 


(M 




•j as 


NcowMiOWhN 


-<1< 


CO 


CO 


co 


"* 


IQ 


CO 


-* 


CO 


^ 


■<tl 




s w 


Li 

3 




























50 CO 




























<J3 


m 




























tf 


































a j 






























-< 5 

53 O 


J3 




























+3 


10MU501<*«^CO 


© 


W 


IQ 


o 


co 


00 


^H 


CO 


1 


1 


1 1 






TtHT-ICOTflOOt— »o 


eq 


O 


Oj 




CO 


t*. 


■^ 


in 










£ BS Q 

«5 co <( 


T3 


CMCMfO^HCMi-li-i'^H 


CI 


Ol 


b- 


co 


-CH 


co 


Ol 


Ol 










T3 




























as erf 


§ 
































3 PS 






























53 X 

Sg 6 

is 


0> 

6 

3 


©©m©t--©inin 


N 


co 


Ol 


03 


IQ 


o 


oo 


o 


Ol 


„ 


t- CO 




O^iJIMNlONn 


OS 




CO 


r^ 


LO 


Tf< 


oo 


CO 


CO 


o 


CO CD 




w^towtc^^us 


SO 


Tf< 


C5 


CO 

of 


«# 


^; 


oo 


LO- 


m 


t- 


OO CO 




w. 




























£* 




































a 


«OT*4i-ie<ioic<Mso 


co 


o 




no 


co 


CO 


CO 


OT 


os 


co 


OS CD 




w 


o 


» ^ N © CO © -<*H © 


■* 


o 


T*l 


CCi 


CO 


1— 1 


r— 


Ol 


DC 


.T-l 


"<*< »H 




H 


-^> 


CO«OOt-»t>-l>-iOiO 


i— i 


Ol 


OJ 




o 


Ol 


oo 


co 




Ol 


CS CM 




rig 


<+9 

o 


_r 


^_ 


_| 


,-, 


^H 


y-t 


Ol 


t— 


l^ 


^ 


CO 


« (M 




n 
























- 




CD 






























5 


©moO<M-*.-HCOin 


r^ 


CO 


OS 


Ol 


OO 


Ol 


Ol 


■* 


CO 


o 


00 o 




O 


o3 


CO©0©l>'COCDm 


o 


Ol 


IQ 


MH 


Ol 


M< 


oo 


CO 


co 


o 


O I- 




O 


1* 


OO O N © © © © CM 


«* 


1— 1 


ws 


1-1 


as 


OS 


CO 


OS 


o 


OS 


t— CO 






3 














T— 1 


■<*< 


<* 


Ol 




CM ft 






GO 






























a 


©e<i.-iincMoo©cNi 


■* 


OS 


>o 


CO 


CO 


oo 


Ol 




-M 


00 


CM OS 




!« S 


O 


■^in©<N©OOt— © 






on 




IQ 


oo 


an 


-h 


Oa 


Ol 


OS OO 




-u 


HNWNi|IMWU3 


t>. 


■* 


oo 


IO 


IQ 


OS 


oo 


»o 


CO' 


oo 


os m 




03 O 












Ol 


















03 OS 
ft W 


« 
























































fa CO 


CD 
S 


*c*©OOt>.©©t-Tt< 


CO 


CO 


o 


«* 


-* 


© 


os 


co 


LO 


m 


© 00 




03 


irjhOWOl'jlHijI 


IQ 




IB 


t^ 


CO 


Oi 


CO 


IQ 


cr 


o 


co m 




«*H 


M'XI'fMiOiOlO* 


OB 


IQ 


00 


Tf 


^ 


o 


OS 


w 


1- 


CO 


© © 




































3 










Ol 












— 1 








0Q 






























a 


1 1 i 1 1 1 1 CO 


« 


Ol 


CO 


t« 


00 


on 


00 


o 


OS 


CO 


© © 




^ 03* 


o 


© 


|x 




CO 


CO 


Ol 


CO 


CO 


r^ 


CO- 


LO 


m •** 




43 


in 


CI 


CI 


-* 


OS 


co 


co 


CO 


Ol 


CO 


CO 


in cm 




9 o 

& as 
?3 W 


O 

PQ 










"- 1 
















































8 


1 1 1 1 1 1 CO © 


co 


iq 


^ 


_H 


o 


OS 


IQ 


C5 


co 


OS 


CM © 




e3 


i-i CO 


<* 


Ol 


co 


US 


CO 


~* 


Of) 


-H 


in 




CM © 




«*H 


CO t- 


<# 


■* 


i^ 




tl 


CO 


IQ 


■* 


I- 


IQ 


© CM 




































3 










Ol 




















W 




























03 






























< 






























H 






























^ 


































OO © © — < N W * "5 


T- 


r- 


00 


OS 


e 




Ol 


co 


-* 


IQ 


CO f— 








C5CSOOOOOO 


Q 


© 


5 


o 






















0000©©©0SCSO 


OS 


OS 


c. 


ft 


a> 


Ol 


OS 


OS 


OS 


06 


OS © 



m 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



193 



cs 




Cft 


fc. 


0) 


"> 


> 




Rj 


O 




r-i 




^ 


CD 


O 


CD 









a 


























ther 
igh 
vice 


1 1 


1 I 1 I OS 00 N 


CM -h 


l^ ^H 


.-I CM © CM 


© 


© 


■* 










00 00 CM 


CM O0 


1— t- 


© © lO l-H 




CM 


OS 










1— t CO Tfl 


"*< ■* 


© CO 


* * CO Tf 


"* 


115 


CM 








feWfc 
























& M 














* 










c 
























ther 

ow 

vice 


1 1 


1 1 1 1 "* CO © 


"5 CO 


CO i-l 


Ol N N O 


CM 


© 


CM 










t~ © CM 


© ■* 


i-H CN 




© 


© 


U5 










CM CO CO 


CM ■<*: 


CO CM 


CO i*l CM CM 


CM 


■* 


CO 
















** 
















£ GG 




















CO 














































<! 
























H 




>h _ 0) 

a>j3 w 


1 '■H 


CM O i-h 00 © ~H CO 


l-» 115 


© -H 


115 N O © 


^ 


00 


■* 








o 


us oo us os t>- t>. oo 


CM © 


"5 CM 


CO © l-H Tt< 


CO 


115 


CO 








J3 bD"C 


CM 


* N * M ^1 to «5 


TJH *D 


OS r*l 


t>- © Tj< 115 


© 


O0 


115 








g«S 








T_l 
















& M 
























G 
























m a> 


O CM 


00 CO l>- © CO 00 © 


CM © 


CO t- 


00 U5 ~H CO 


t^ 


CM 


© 








> cj 


CO © 


o ->*i © oo © cm 115 


T-H © 


,-H ^ 


N CO CO O 


© 


t^ 


© 








<M »-t 


t(I N W N » >5 115 


CO © 


© I* 


*>. © U5 © 


U5 


00 


"5 








2^ S 








l-l 


.—i 






































^ s 


























£ OQ 

1 >= 


























CM 


1*1 OS 


n w in uj n * h 


© OS 


OS lO 


i*l © © © 


^ 


^H 


t>- 








H O 


O CM 


O) rt « » N i« (N 


l-H 00 


© © 


lO l-H lO 1*1 


© 


^H 






pj 




►J i 

a a 


6 


CO CO 


00 tl * ■* * 19 N 


■** © 


00 1*1 


© © 00 115 


CO 


© 


t^ 




O 




a H 






















> 




B <J 






















« 




O 






















OB 


















































ti 




p £ 




k*i CM 


O) N N O 00 ■* N 


OS CO 


CM 1 


N N N | 


1 


I 


OO 




►J 

M 




•+-S 


■^ OS 


CO OS CO © CO © ■"# 


© «r- 


CO 


OO O0 CM 






CO 






M H 

W p 

8 c 


CD 

"3 


H5 OS 


i—l © © 00 00 © © 
l-H .-H 


© © 


CO 


CO O0 © 

t-T co" cm" 






CO 




. M 




l-H 




















H 




° < 






































































H 


























05 




si 

p s 




























1*1 OS 


O0 if CO © U5 ^H i-H 


© CO 


© 1>. 


© U5 115 CM 


CO 


CM 


00 






-+«s 


O lO 


e i* o m o >o to 


rJH O0 


OS 115 


O 115 CO Ol 


-*l 


■* 


© 




O 




CD 

i— i 


CO CO 


11} CO ifl t|I i* io to 


CO t~- 


© 1*1 


t>- 00 lO i*l 


© 


OO 


115 






Q 

ft 
o 

Pm 
























6 
o 

03 

«4H 


115 OS 


CO O0 i-H © U0 © l-H 


O *H 


© CM 


oo © t^- oo 


© 


^H 


CO 






00 CM 


N N 0O » tO O N 


© T* 


t- CM 


1*1 T-l © -^ 


US 




•^ 






"* '"I 


115 to 115 tB i< tO O 


lO t~- 


© © 


N ti to to 


© 


00 


■* 






H 


3 


»H 






l-H 














O 
Ph 


K2 






















CO 
























P5 
























S3 


1 1 


1 1 1 1 1 1 CO 


CO © 


© 115 


i* N 1(5 N 


lO 


t^ 


© 








00 


1*1 t>. 


© CM 


CO i-H CO 115 


CN1 


115 


t>. 








t^ 


1*1 © 


CO © 


Ol H U5 t* 


t^ 


00 


U5 






> to 


3 
ZC 








cm" 


1-1 












ti 
























PS 






















«l 






















a 






















|H 
























00 OS 


© i-H CM CO i^l 115 © 


t>- 00 


© © 


-H CM CO i*l 


ua 


CD 


t^ 








OS OS 


©©©©©©© 


© © 


© l-H 




















00 00 


© © © © © OS © 


OS © 


OS © 


© © © © 


© 


© 


OS 



tf 






G 


+J 


cci 


a 


T3 








<1> 


3 


+s 


orl 


C3 


CJ 


is 


rrs 


© 


© 


,4 


OS 


+j 








a 


C 




"H 


Ti 




G 


o 


c« 


> 


T3 


V 


a 


a} 


r> 


ti 


Pm 






+J 


n 


-t-> 
cp 
tn 


a 


OQ 


3 


^ 




t/j 


cd 





iS 


> 



rG O 

.2 3 



(A 


G 


c 


G 




■+J 


0(1 


rl: 




CO 


o 
c3 


-= 


U 




T3 


o 


C 


A 


efl 


o 




Fh 


G 
O 



J 




*j 


o 


o 


fc 


tH 




s 









0) 


> 


tii 








03 






o 


< 


« 


1 


s 




d 


a 


^a 


R 


ill 


O 


a 


Z 


£ 



fe 



194 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Table No. 36. — Number of Bacteria per Cubic Centimeter in Water from Vari- 
ous Parts of the Metropolitan Water Works, from 1898 to 1917 inclusive. 

[Averages of weekly determinations.] 











Chestnut Hill Reservoir. 


Southern Service Taps. 


Year. 


Sudbury 
Aqueduct 
Terminal 
Chamber. 


Cochituate 
Aqueduct. 


Effluent 

Gate-house 

No. 2.^ 


Low Service, 

ISO Boylston 

Street. 


High Service, 

1 Ashburton 

Place. 


1898 


207 


145 


Ill 


96 


- 


1899, . 








224 


104 


217 


117 


123 


1900, . 








248 


113 


256 


188 


181 


1901, . 






«. 


225 


149 


169 


162 


168 


1902, . 








203 


168 


121 


164 


246 


1903, . 








76 


120 


96 


126 


243 


1904, . 








347 


172 


220 


176 


355 


1905, . 








495 


396 


489 


231 


442 


1906, . 








231 


145 


246 


154 


261 


1907, . 








147 


246 


118 


130 


176 


1908, . 








162 


138 


137 


136 


148 


1909, . 








198 


229 


119 


150 


195 


1910, . 








216 


- 


180 


178 


213 


1911, . 








205 


204 


151 


175 


197 


1912, . 








429 


450 


227 


249 


259 


1913, . 








123 


243 


157 


119 


140 


1914, . 








288 


- 


252 


174 


220 


1915, . 








163 


- 


128 


117 


134 


1916, . 








128 


- 


85 


102 


105 


1917, . 








178 


112 


119 


119 


141 


Averag 


es, 


224 


196 


180 


153 


208 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



195 






Si 






co 



©* c3 



© 

© 



co 

© 



CO 



© 



CO 

6 

PQ 
< 



^^ "-J3 

c3 

1,0 El! 



H © 

a > 


•(aotAiag 
q3xjj) no^sog; 'aoBjg 


^O^NMNi-iN-hO-«h 


= 




■(aotAiag 
AVO'q) uo;sog '^aaj^g 
uo^s^og 081 V s <It?X 


hhhNNMhNhhOh 


- 




55 . 

Ss 


•(aoiAjag qSiH) W3J9 

-A3 '^98I^g 3[0O0ITBJJ 
'UOI^g 811^ ^B CTBJ, 


OCOiO^^iOiftUSCOCOiOia 


*G 


•(801 

-Ajag Avoq;) piojpajj 
'P IB A pooAvua{£) ye dej, 


OHONNNiHNrtrtrtH 


1—t 




Fells 
Reser- 
voir. 


•asnoq-a^Q ^nannjg 


teo^^^^^ioffleteia 


»o 


* B 

O 55 
a, O 
GOO, 


•q^dap-ptjij 


io«o»o , <j<'^i'*»i3'0«oi > - co ia 


o 


55 H 


Z'ON 

asnoq-a^'B*) ^uannjg; 


HOHNMNHlMrtOOH 


- 


•(q.onpanby 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 -« 1 1 1 


3 


•(^onpanby 

AMnqpng) ^[ui 


rtrtN«5Tl<TtllNW<N'HNN 


(M 


H 

H P 

-< S 
^ a 

o 
O 

g 


t'sureai^g ^uannuj 


nncoh i i i i i i i 
cnj cni co co co 


o 

CO 


•rao^og 


r^ — oot^«o 1 1 I 1 [ 1 I 

~H CN CO^H — 1 


(M 


•q^dap-pipj 


■* SO 00 t^ -$« | | | | | I I 


«D 


•aoBjing 


*U5»N^ 1 1 CO CO CO | 1 


»« 


Fram- 

INGHAM 

Reser- 
voir 
No. 3. 


•qidap-ptj^ 


t-trtiNiflTtf-^egiNco^-csieq 


CM 


a o 

P > 
a a 

Q H 

t) 00 


•[9uuBq3 uadQ jo pug 


i— lOO^-^-fOco^sooe^i 


lO 


•rao^og 


i-Hi— i<M^Tti-*ic<icoc<i^^<Mco 


IN 


•q^dap-ptpi 


i-H^OCM^f»OCNl<M(M-H«V|cO 


<M 


•aoBjjng 


i-i-H-HCOTfTt*'— 'COCdOCMCO 


IM 


H M 

w o 

32 > 

5= « 

a h 

© co 


•aaAig ja^BMin^g 




•jaAig ^axodaumQ 


OococviiooocOTtiiftcoioesi 
•*cNicococo''* | cococoTfcoco 


CO 
CO 


•a3ptig ^aai}g -ia^saoao^ 






•uio^og 


rtOOO0)OON«OOO 


o 


•q^dap-pxjM 


rtoeiiaoioosiMNrHoo 


o 


•aoejang 


i—* in. cioicftoci»-"Hi- o ci 


o 


a 

55 
O 
















M 

S 
o 

> 
< 



3 

-a 

a 

c 
o 

S 

S 

s 

















u 




-d 




0J 




a 


OQ 


2 


a 

OS 

c 


c 
a 


X 


© 






^3 


+9 


v 


fl 


Q 


a 




9) 


© 






Q 




© 




(H 


© 


a 


— 


-i-> 


S 


C 


= 


4-> 


o 


X 






X 


X 






— 


- 


c 


© 

— 




*J 


© 


it 

a 


zi 


a 


X 


Ifl 



© .5 
- > 



196 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 






CO 



O 






© 

ft- 
o 



2 

£ 
o 



a 

© 

© 









co 
1 

ft. 



£ 



co 
6 

w 

9 



© 
© 

J3 



e3 ,S 



'<>> .S- 



a 

O c3 






a 

c3 



© 

_= 



■9 



© 

a 

I 



z . 
k a 
a w 
35 > 


•(aoiAjag 
qSiH) uojsog 'ooblj 
uoi-inqusy \ %v drcj, 


a> co o ^ «o ~* "5 oo 05 oo oo co 


00 


C5 O — N**N^<OONC)N 
CO **< ^ ^f "O «0 t— t- I© "5 ""t 1 ^ 


«5 


•(aoiAjag 
avo^) uo^sog *jaaj;g 
uoisi^og 081 1« ' d^X 


©MtO'C'HNN^iOaiON 


to 


coooooioe<j'«*<-H'»tit^.Ttir»oo 

M«M^K5©r-t , -©'0'« | t<5 


z 

« a 
a o 

Oh - 

o w 


•(aoiAiag qSiH) wa-ra 
-A3 ';aaj;g ^OOOUBJJ 

'uoi^g eJij[ ye dej, 






•(aoiAjag 
M07) pjojpajq; 'pre A 
pooAvuaiQ ye de j, 


ooooo^^NinwiONoo 




ej*N«HoocoN»ooo 


Spot Pond* 

(Depth 
at Place of 
Observation 

28.0 Feet). 


•rao^og 


OOUSOoOiOMcDMOOOO 


o 
o 


ICN»rHOONlOO"5!000>0 
MMM'*'>tiOtDN©iO'*P5 


•q^dap-pift 


CO'*>15^rHiOT)(NOOOiO'-< 


US 


©©NN-4MM©t»NN<e 


•aoBjmg 


^NrfieoO^TtiTjiiHOOHO 




»ocot— eoooeN«co"5t— co^f^ 
cococO'*i'*feot-t~coiO'-*<co 




Chest- 
nut 
Hill 

Reser- 
voir. 




N-HC»eS00NeONO>efiC<5iO 


oo 


tot—t— ■-*i»-i»rte<i»OkOcO'^c© 

«WM'^>0©Nt-©lflr)<M 


Lake 
CochituateI 

(Depth 

at Place of 

Observation 

62.0 Feet). 


•uzo^og 


TtNfflON 
1 1 1 1 1 1 1 

CO CO CO "^ ^ 


OS 

oo 

CO 


•u;dap-piH 


©■*t< OS OO CO 

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 

m io co •** co 

CO CO CO ^1 ^ 


o 


•aoejing 


■<-< t— CO ■»*< O y— 1 •>* t— 

■<tl Tt< t— . -h <3> 00 t— O 
CO CO CO ■"*! ■>* t— t— co 




Framingham ' 

Reservoir No. 

3 (Depth 

at Place of 

Observation 

20.5 Feet). 


•Tno^og 


OONlOOONOOOOONMH 


t- 


iC®!OrtS-H05M-*«)0« 
cococOT^^eOcot— cOtf5ri<co 


00 


•q;d8p-piK 


ON»00«O'tO'*'*«M 


tr- 
io 


COCOCO-«*l»OC©t-"t"~ t— IfiTtlCO 


•aoBjong 


OSTtli— iC»M-hi*MC6O0 0O(» 


o 




Wachu- 
sett 

Aque- 
duct. 


•pmreqQ 

uadQ jo pug; 


C0"5»C5OOOOOOOO 


CO 

ui 


Tj<COM<00CO'^t— .OOOrt<05CO 
COCOCOCO'*i"5iO«05DiCCOCO 


Sudbury i 
Reservoir 

(Depth 

at Place of 

Observation 

54.5 Feet). 


•rao^og 


COCOOOOOCOOiOOO»0"00^ 




®cetooo!t^'*N'<*/OTtoto 


•q^dap-pij\[ 


»*OOMOOO»IOMO 


C3» 




•aoBjang 


COCOCO'-tl>OtOt— t>-0«0"*<CO 


CO 

o 


Wachusett 1 
Reservoir 

(Depth 

at Place of 

Observation 

107 Feet). 


•uio^og 


OOOUJNOOONiO") O 

■^iffltON^OCSOM-H lO 
COCOCOCO"*l>OlOlf5»r3"0 CO 


CM 

O 


•q;dep-pij\[ 


MU5Mt((iOMONOOO>0 






•aoBjing 


0i*©!000M'-i»*OO« 




COCOCOCO^ti»Ot--t— cDiOTt* w 


a 

z 

o 

2 






January, . 

February, 

March, 

April, 

May, 

June, 

July, 

August, 

September, 

October, . 

November, 

December, 


© 

© 

> 

< 



T3 

© 

© 

3 



3 
00 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



197 



Table No. 39. — Temperatures of the Air at Three Stations on the Metropolitan 

Water Works in 1917. 

[Degrees Fahrenheit.] 









Chestnut Hill 
Reservoir. 


Framingh. 


V.M. 


Clinton. 


Month. 


a* 

3 

s 
1 


a 

3 

a 
a 

3 




a 

3 

a 

*&* ■ 

3 


a 

3 

■a 

s 


a 

03 


a 

3 

'x 

S3 


a 

3 

a 
s 


a 


January, 


54 


i 


29.0 


53 





27.0 


51 


-4 


25.4 


February, 






53 


—6 


25.4 


49 


—6 


24.7 


50 


—19 


21.5 


March, 






60 


9 


36.2 


57 


7 


35.2 


57 


3 


33.6 


April, 






71 


24 


44.2 


70 


24 


44.3 


69 


23 


42.4 


May, 






82 


33 


50.9 


80 


34 


50.9 


77 


33 


48.8 


June, 






90 


44. 


66.9 


88 


44 


66.9 


83 


47 


64.3 


July, 






98 


53 


73.4 


98 


53 


74.1 


94 


54 


71.6 


August, 






99 


54 


73.2 


100 


48 


73.2 


95 


50 


69.5 


September, 






82 


33 


61.9 


81 


33 


58.8 


77 


30 


56.1 


October, . 






70 


29 


51.0 


70 


29 


49.7 


79 


30 


48.7 


November, 






63 


11 


38.0 


63 


11 


37.0 


62 


10 


36.4 


December, 






45 


—14 


24.2 


42 


—14 


22.1 


44 


—16 


22.9 


Averages, . 


- 


- 


45.6 


- 


- 


47.0 


- 


- 


45.1 



198 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



© 



o 
ft. 

© 

5- 



r© 



"« 




<45 




■*o 




© 




fc. 




*W 




ft 




© 




TS 


*>- 




Ob 


^3 


n 


w 


»H 


s 


GO 


s 


. 


© 


03 


co 


Q 


o 




•^ 


•A) 


>*o 


C - 


<o 


K 


<W 


M 




^> 


© 


S 


O 


•<s> 




-K» 


T* 


<4) 


s 


co 


r< 


CO 




<» 


co 


X) 


ft 


i2 




"s- 


<o 


*. 


1 


r© 


"& 


9 

^ 


co 


-e 


sr> 


S 


•<«a 


© 


^ 


„ 




*f? 


« 


J- 


•<s> 


© 


© 


© 


4 


cq 




w 


^ 


©5 

© 


to 
©> 


5 


K 


<Si 


<» 


<S) 


^1 





©5 



© 

co 






O 

6 

H 
< 



oo — < -h oo e<> o <m i 



E2 *- • I 1 l l ll 



O CO | C5 | | | | 



00 CO I | | | I I 



oo t-h co <n | i i 



O O <-H CO I <M I 



"H I I I I I I 



(N CO I I 1 I I 



rl 1Q | I | I | 



■a *■? I i l l l 



a 






bJO 




o 






a 




-o 


. 


. 


C 




a 






3 




C3 






T3 






a> 




13 


o 


fl 


V 


53 


1 


a 


CO 


a 




b8 

CO 


o 


Ej 


co 


«H 


a 


C 0> 


CO 

> 




o 

13 

'5 


co 

> 


O^, 


- 


► 




-, 


— ;o 


r* 


cj 




> 


- — 


0> 


> 


--I 


o 




Ih 




*3 

S3 


H 


o 


<5 


k) 


a 



53 — a> 



3 

-3 



B 

= 

gg 



a 
o 

T3 

a 



<: h) 



3 o 



X, a> 



G 

s 



CO 


a 


<-t-H 


a 


O 






c 


(I) 
CD 


o 
u 






co 


-t-> 


CO 


bO 




3 




O 






a> 

a 


I 


a 


T) 


3 


0) 


+J 


It 


0) 


o 
> 


3 

CO 


O 

s 


co 


T2 


M 


a 


IX 


a 


*d 


T3 



CO 

c a 

o —, 

O CD 

t> CD 

.5 "o 



a; <u a? 



S a> 

to '3 

a; S 

— co- 



3 •§ 



Xo. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



199 



£ 















^ - 






=Q 






5Q 



< 



O -< SSI PO I ! N *S< 

N N Z O t~- 

— rsi -h ca r-i 



— o — » 



*-* oo e« 1-1 



-^ • • . . . -^ 

3 - 

• =2 

'""' -*a ' ' 

O 3 ^ t>- 

» S4 » O) 

— 3 ^ 

re cs t^. ~s 

J - ~ w' 

3 .- — B 

- - .= - 

3 _ 3 

23 _2 -> X 





6 


C 


— 




p 




= 




3 












.- 




X 


.^ 


X 


^r 


X 


i£ 


•--. 


= 


r 


3 


s 


- 


- 


- 


- 


■— 




■*■' 




""* 


3 


— ■ 




■ 




X 




X 




■ 




3 




3 




3 




: 


3 
— 


> 


t: 


> 


tx 


> 


3 
— 


> 


C 


- 





- 


^ 


d 





~ 



r< > ~ > ~ > 'r< > 



200 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



ca 




»s? 




■fci 




Si 




hO 




^ 




*w 




•<^ 




». 




a. 




3 




eo 




eo 




S 




3 




o 




^ 




"e 




SK 




« 




CO 




co 




'c-J 




"«■* 




'c-* 




o 




l"»^ 




« 




*. 




<o 




S> 




<*> 




CQ 




co 




-« 










«S. 


s 


>~i 


•c*> 


Oi 


»t 


••—1 


J- 




<W 




CT* 


»»« 


5- 


yo 


c 




^ 


cj 


-S 


Q 


K 




« 


«o 


j«. 


^ 


co 


co- 


co 


st 


e 


>v 


•<s> 


•4} 


Q 






fe 


CO 


e 


CO 


?*< 


•«-? 


i-~ 


CO 




£ 


© 


**s 


a, 


^5 


© 



© 

co" 
co 



© 



"5s 



6 

w 







■"*< 


00 W 


a> 


pH 


KS 





CO 


eo 


CO' 


ig 


O 


~r 


CO 


CO 


SS 


co 


t^ 


m 




© 




05 


CO 


O HO 


X 


Q 


10 


— i 





CO 


T 


00 


00 


CJ 


35 


uo 


t» 


CO 


CO 


— , 




CM 




J£ 


CM 


t>. CO 


__ 


»o 


e 


CO 


^H 


■^< 


»o 


CO' 


t- 


^H 


Cl 


CO 


CO 


t- 


Cl 


•«*< 




© 

Os 






CM 


CO OS 


O) 


-f 


»o 


CO 


t^ 


10 


iO 


-r 


f 


UO 


CO 


CJ 


cc 


co 


Cl 


CM 




T. 

3 
< 

s 


3 




00 








~ 






























s 


00 — 


a 


MS 


^~. 


oa 


CO 


CO 


cc 


co 


CO 


no 


— 


^ 


CJ 


t^ 


X 


O 


00 


I 




r- t^- 


S 




OJ 


Ol 




CO 






X 


CO 


X 




CO 


OS 





O 


OS 




4a 

a 


© 
"5 


-co t- 

-h OS 


ir; 


to 


CM 

eo 


CM 
■-O 


OT 
uo 


"0 

Ol 


U3 


co 

CJ 


UO 

CO 


co 


CJ 




Cl 





«X0 

to 


ITS 


00 






4) 


1 


OO O 


zc 


CO 


co 


c 


t~ 


CO 


OS 




LO 


t^ 


r- 


-r 


CO 


cr- 




CM 


CO 






Ph 


m 


-V 


c-i 


CM 


t~ 


CO 


CI 


CI 


CI 


CI 


CJ 














o_ 










■* 


































0* 








00 


fa ° 


e 


^0 


CO 


CM 


oc 


^H 


>; 


CO 


„ 


r~ 


1 


10 


OS 


-r 


X 


«o 


_ 


00 






CO 


co co 


-0 


LO 





"f 


■a 


"5 


CO 






CJ 


-r 


CJ 


CO 


cr. 


CO 


IM 


«o 


U0 








CO OS 


rM 


so 


to 


LO 


'00' 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 





-r 


CJ 


t^ 


Cl 


O 


■^ 






^J* 








































©' 
eo 








co — 1 


its 


CO 





CO 


CO 


CO 






i-O 


l> 


r- 


X 




r~ 


cr. 


OS 


oT 








O CM 


10 




CO 


99 


CM 


LO 


t- 


" 




~~" 


10 


^ 




Cl 


iO 




00 

CO 




TJ< 


OS IO 


^-( 


Q 


— 


-r 


CM 


10 


00 


00 


t^ 





cr. 


-r 


X 


f^ 


CO 


!>. 


fH 


00 






© 


-f -1-1 


t^ 


5 


US 


-f 


3 







kO 


CI 


* 


CO 


co 


X 


cc 







O0 


CM 






© 


CNJ CM 


!M 


c-i 


ua 




~f 




1C 


cc 







<# 





cr. 


'X 


00 


O0 






to 




IO ■>* 


_| 


co 


IC 


t^ 


CO 




CO 


CT 


CO 


to 


I* 


t^ 


CO 


OS 


CO 


CO 


eo* 










in ~* 

CM CM 


(M 


■>S 


-f 


CO 


CO' 


IQ 


CO 


"CH 


-f 


l-O 


10 


O 




'"' 


CO 


00 


CM 


t>i 










































eo* 






1 


1 1 


1 


1 


1 


-r 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


-<*< 


© 
















cci 


























OS 






c- 












O 


























OS 


O 




00 


Tt< O 


^ 


JC 


00 


03 


cr. 


CO 


CO 


cr. 


cr. 


as 


t~ 


O 


r^ 


CO 


CO 


CO 


■»* 


O0 






t>» 




to 


CO 


uo 


t^ 


CO 


OT 


cr. 


r- 





'X 


X 




to 


CO 





OS 





to 






00 


l>- O 


DC 


C5 


CM 


UO 


CO 


r~ 


CO 


co 


Cl 


CO 


cr. 




in 


"Bp 


00 


»o 


to_ 






00 


_* 


O O0 




O 


lO 


OS 


LO 


IC 


<* 


t^ 





CO 


eo 


UO 


so 


>o 


-If 


to 


»" 


O 








« O 


00 


CO 


CM 


CO 


Ci 


CM 


CO 


CI 


-# 


Eq 


CO 




Cl 


CO 






00 


CO 








O0 1-1 








™ 


























«o 






OS 


i-( o> 


to 


CO 


>9f 


tVH 


05 


CO 


t^ 


"* 


CO 


SO 


CO 





TT- 


cr 





co 


p^ 


U9 






CM 


«* 


t^ 


CM 





«* 





cT 


CO 


CI 





Cl 


r~ 


CJ 


LO 


r^ 


as 





m 


t^ 




e 


oo_ 


t^ 


<M 


00 


00 


C5 


CO 





t^ 


IQ 


cr. 


O 


CO 


cr. 


00 


>c 


eo 


eo 






tH 


CO 


CO t-- 


__ 


OS 


CI 


CO 


OS 


os 


CO 


UO 


CO 


O 


f 


_ 


CO 


rt< 


_ 


00 


CM* 


10 
10 








t>- tn 


CO 


CO 


*r 


<* 


co 




CI 




CI 


CJ 


Cl 












CM 










CO 


































OO 









CM C35 


N 


Oi 


•f 


1Q 


CO 


t^ 


t^ 


S^ 


CO 


CO 


■cr. 


10 


•«*< 


O 





"* 


O 


uo 






* 


O 00 


<M 


t^ 


00 


CM 


Cc- 


cr. 


t— 


■O 


co 


lO 


3 


Cl 




O 


to 




CM 


t-1 






10 


Tf O 


00 


<# 


O 




Ol 







cr- 




UJ 





^1 


i~^ 


O 




r- 


tc- 














































OS 




eo 


Tt< i-H 





01 


CO 


OS 


CM 


CO 


<# 


lO 


-* 


Cl 


■* 


t^ 


IQ 


Cs" 




to 


to 


"# 




CM 


CO OJ 


00 


" 




C-d 


CO 


C-5 


CI 




Cl 


Cl 














00 


eo 










































-* 






to 


—1 O 


KS 


1 


00 


1 


CO 


T 





t^ 


1 


-rr 


1 


1 


1 


1 





»o 


00 


eo 






CN> 


CM 10 


IO 




35 




OS 


CM 


r^ 


t— 




Tt< 













«* 





© 




^« 




O Oi 






s» 




«9 





cr. 


CO 

















o_ 


t^ 






»H 








































CM 








»o t-T 


05 




iC 




OS* 


co" 


CO 
















*f 


CO 


CO 

to 






O 


O CM 


r^ 


CO 


Tf 


CM 


•o 


CO 


CO 





1 


CO 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


I 


-*l 


iO 






i« 


•*! 


t^ 





CO 


t- 


CM 




CO 



















>o 


«o 




to 


00 


O0 O 


»o 




CN 


CM 


t^ 


CM 


00 


■* 
























»H 








































to 




t~ 


<0 t(< 


»o 


iC 


U0 


CO 





IQ 


CO 




















3* 


t— 






© 


»o 








CM 






CI 




















O 




co 






CM 


































■**< 






1 


1 t~- 


1 


1 


1 


| 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


»- 


>>• 


w 






CO 


































CO 





X 


00 




CO 


































eo 




tH 








































© 


I-H 














































© 


00 


1 


1 





os 


co 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


I 


OS 


00 






to 


IO i-H 









t^ 


t^ 
























t>. 


00 






©_ 

to 


O CM 

00 






of 


CO 
CM 


CO 
























•o 

CO 


cm' 

eo 




CM 


CM | 


1 


1 


-r< 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


I 


1 


00 


s 






St 


00 






CO 




























10 




*« 


«* 


©_ 






"# 



































M 


00 


os" 
t>l 






cm" 




























to 


eo 




1 


■^ 1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


I 


■* 


»o 








M< 


































-«*< 


O 




00 




CM 


































CM 






C4 








































© 






1—1 1 


! 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


i 


1 


CM 


>o 






t>- 


lr~ 


































cS 


© 






»>- 


O 






































O 








































t>. 




•0 


©* 


s 


































CM 


CM 




ir- 


«>• 1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


">*< 


19" 






co 


■* 


































CO 


t^ 




8 


t« 




































CJS 








t-C 


































00 


00* 






© 


CO 


































OS 






© 


10 1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


j 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


I 


3! 


t-- 






00 





































OS 


eo 







© 




































© 






■* 


to 


CO* 


































eo 

CM 


•»»• 







CO | 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


I 


CO 


© 








t-» 


































O0 


»r- 






So 

©~ 


»o 


































eM_ 
»o" 

CM 


■<t< 




CM 


t— 1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 




1 


1 


OS 


© 






© 


CO 


































CM 


© 






©_ 


to 


































r» 






3 


(M 


© 


































CM 
CM 


■^C 




CM 


1 I 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


i 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


CM 


© 






© 




































© 


eo 




s 


o& 
CO 




































00 

eo 


00 






hi 










































a 


0) 










































i 


S3 






































oT 

1 
"08 

Eh 




P 

O 



w 

p 

H 

ffl 


C 
S3 

a 



Works. 
Boston, 
Somerville, . 




3 


4 

3 




> 




a 
*3 


"0 
u 

3 




© 

7. 



E 




> 

CJ 


C 

P 

c 

*9 

(- 
Oi 

c2 


a 



u 

a 


B 




& 

O 
E 

a 


a 

a 

A 

a 

Q 


a 




C 
O 

■*-> 

to 
Q 

d 


4» 

G 

a 
a 


8 

03 

a 
S . 

i 


4J* 

St 

0) 
•m 

"3 





s 


S 





W 


a S 


s 


pei 


^ 


< 


a 


s 


QQ 


« 


H~ 


s? 


m 







a 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



201 



Table No. 43. — Number of Service Pipes, Meters and Fire Hydrants in the 
Several Cities and Towns supplied by the Metropolitan Water Works, Dec. 
81, 1917, and the Number of Services and Meters installed during the Year 
1917. \ 



Citt or Town. 



Services. 



Meters. 



Fire 
Hydrants. 



Services 
installed. 



t Meters 
installed. 



Boston, 
Somerville, 
Maiden, . 
Chelsea, . 
Everett, . 
Quincy, . 
Medford, . 
Melrose, . 
Revere, l . 
Watertown, 
Arlington, 
Milton, 
Winthrop, 
Stoneham, 
Belmont, . 
Lexington, 
Nahant, . 
Swampscott, 
Totals, 



105,352 
13,509 
8,126 
5,178 
6,018 
9,977 
6,600 
4,167 
4,707 
3,132 
3,108 
2,030 
3,016 
1,647 
1,729 
1,241 
730 
1,925 



63,071 
10,028 
7,862 
5,167 
3,530 
9,119 
6,600 
4,354 
3,603 
3,139 
3,108 
2,030 
2,945 
1,639 
.1,729 
1,231 
550 
1,925 



9,616 
1,235 
604 
400 
585 
1,141 
708 
376 
303 
411 
500 
439 
300 
156 
249 
220 
101 
199 



1,140 

154 

29 

58 

41 

285 

196 

72 

135 

168 

170 

70 

66 

13 

98 

37 

12 

59 



2,172 

317 

80 

59 

264 

263 

369 

72 

254 

172 

170 

70 

46 

28 

101 

92 

34 

59 



182,192 



131,630 



17,543 



2,803 



4,622 



1 Includes small portion of Saugus. 



202 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 






3 



<J5 
CO 



o 

•fed 

OS CO 






1 



la: 



©S 

e 

a. 



3 

6 



9 



e 

fe 

£ 
e 



© 





33 i 

^ M H 




t^ 


CO 


»« 


<M 


OS 


O 


eo 


CO 


CM 


OS 


o 


oo 


r* 




h a « a 


•tanraiuii\i 


■<<H 


CN 


CM 


CM 


CO 
CM 


CO 
CM 


CM 
CM 


CM 
CM 


CO 
CM 


CO 
CM 


■«<H 

CM 


CO 
CM 


CO 
CM 




c > ^ 3 
s - ' £ 






























































63 S & tH 

£ £ J 




^ 


o 


tM 


^ 


o 


r» 


OS 


CO 


lrt> 


OS 


oo 


t^ 


OS 


a 


•ranxnixBi\[ 




CO 

CN« 


CO 
CM 


CO 
CM 


CO 

CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


"3 
CM 


ITS 

CM 


«3 
CM 


"3 
CM 


"3 
CM 


> 
































oo 






























a 
w 

X 

o 


55 a fc 




to 


t~ 


CO 


CM 


o 


CO 


CO 


o 


»o 


t-- 


CO 


t^ 


00 


fe a 5 . 
o c 2 E- 


•umtaunj^ 


CN| 




CM 


CM 


■<SH 
CM 


CO 
CM 


CM 
CM 


CO 
CM 


CO 
CM 


CO 
CM 


CO 
CM 


CO 
CM 


CO 
CM 


w 


a ra H 

H « u « 

h a 2 h 
< h a oo 






























































CO 


CNJ 


~ 


CM 


o 


00 


00 


t^ 


t^ 


o 


OS 


OS 


o 


z 

a 
a 


•ranunxi3j^ 


to 


CO 
CM 


CO 

CM 


CO 

CM 


CO 

CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CD 
CM 


U3 
CM 


«3 
CM 


CD 
CM 


X 
Eh 






























































X 
O 


2 a g * 
§ £ 2 g 

ri <! a ^ • 




•>* 


CO 


■«HH 


"*H 


■* 


co 


<M 


_ 


^H 


© 


CO 


lH 


CO 


w 


•ranraraijv 


CO 


CO 
CM 


CO 

CM 


CO 
CM 


CO 
CM 


CO 
CM 


eo 

CM 


CO 

CM 


CO 

CM 


CO 

CM 


CO 
CM 


CO 
CM 


CO 
CM 




g 5 a a a 
































° ^ « * a, 

H H « CO * 
§0 £- 

w a 


































00 


00 


OO 


OS 


oo 


00 


oo 


oo 


00 


oo 


OS 


r^ 


00 




•ranmixBj\[ 




<M 


CM 


-*< 

CM 


CM 


•<SH 
CM 


•"JH 

CM 


•"JH 

CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


































a 




-# 


CM 


■** 


CO 


lO 


•* 


■>* 


MH 


■fl 


O 


oo 


CO 


"3 




*e 


•ranraraij\[ 


in 


»o 


»o 


»o 


"3 


lO 


«3 


«5 


>o 


o 


"3 


iO 


"3 




a o 
































2m 

a Eh 






























































s a 




o 


<N 


>* 


"<*< 


rt< 


■^ 


*a 


■* 


"* 


■* 


CO 


•<*< 


"* 





u 


•umraxxBj^ 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CD 


CO 


CO 


CO 




< 2 w 




CO 


CM 


CM 


CO 


CM 






CM 


CM 


CO 


CO 


CM 


CM 




•nmunaij\[ 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CD 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CD 


CO 


CO 


CO 




55 » * 




























































a « 55 


















* 














a a a 
a o a 




CO 


"5 


lO 


«3 


"3 


>c 


CO 


«5 


"3 


"3 


1^ 


US 


U3 




•ranraixEpi 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CD 




•«! fe a 
































SO 






























* 
































SB, 

a •<< Q • 

JKZg 




CO 


■* 


US 


■<# 


CM 


CM 


eo 


•«*< 


eo 


CO 


CM 


CM 


CO 




•mnramij\[ 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CD 




£ a •< P 

Sgo> 
o d 5 < 

00 « 
























































































H 




CS 


OS 


oo 


OS 


t-» 


r^ 


i— i 


_H 


r~ 


oo 


1^ 


^ 


00 


> 


•rammxBj\[ 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


t^ 


t^ 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CD 


CO 


« 


a 






























a 

to 


cu 



































































CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CM 














CM 


^* w 


•uinmimpi 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CD 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


i-3 


a 2 o 

C E- > 
































a po a 
































q >h a 
































a s oo 




CO 


t^ 


t~ 


CO 


t^. 


CO 


oo 


t^ 


CO 


CO 


CO 


"3 


CO 




s a 

* a 


• ainuiirB pj 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CD 


CD 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 




a* 




o 




OS 


l>. 


o 


t^. 


^H 


OS 


o 


o 


O 


O 


o 




oo 

1 § s a 


•ranraTutj^ 


t~» 


t-» 


CD 


CO 


r- 


CD 


t^ 


CO 


t~- 


t-- 


t>. 


t>- 


t» 






























































































































U5 


>o 


"3 


■«HH 


•>* 


CO 


00 


CO 


*n 


•>* 


W3 


CO 


U3 




a 


•ranTnxyepj 


t» 


t~ 


t^ 


t» 


t^. 


t>. 


r>. 


r^ 


t^ 


t-i 


t^ 


t^ 


t^ 
































. 
































a 






o 


OS 


CO 


CO 


CM 


CO 


r^ 


OS 


OS 


r~ 


CM 


US 




oo 

„ P W . 


•uinuiiuTi^ 


■* 


•<»< 


CO 


-*< 


"# 


-SH 


■* 


■«»< 


■>*< 


■^H 


■^ 


•^ 


*& 




55 o « H 
































o £ 55 a 
h ^ r a 
S a S a 
2 z a h 
m S S M 
o a 

55 

a 


































































o 


CO 


o 


Ttl 


CM 


CO 


•«* 


_l 


oo 


CO 


_^ 


_( 




•umun\"Bj\[ 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CD 


CO 


CD 


CD 


"O 


"3 


lO 


CD 




t-^ 


X 
H 


5^ 

5 

>-9 


>> 














s 

cu 

p. 

0Q 




(4° 




CO 

1 






55 
O 

M 


3 

X 


J3 
w 
u 
c3 


u 

< 


c3 

3 


a 

X 

<-> 


3 


CO 

X 
bD 

X 
< 


at 

-S 

o 

o 


e 1 
o 

> 
o 
55 


CP 

w 
e 

P 


u 

< 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



203 



*T3 
CP 

O 

o 



©- 



o 

CO 

© 

cq 
<» 

© 









© 
v. 



© 

CO 
CO 

©5 
© 

CO 



6 





CO 
































P-J-; B 


5 fc 8 H 




<M 


00 


oo 


^H 


o 


t>. 


00 


00 


CO 


CO 


CS 


CS 


t^ 




•ranmimj\[ 


m 

■* 


"*t 


tH 


CM 


CM 




o 


o 




H 


■* 


■* 


-<i< 




H ■< £ 

SB? 






























































* £ 3 ^ 
a X CO <! 

rj O tc ^ 
J H 3 




o 


C35 


o 


o 


O 


CO 


__( 


^ 


t^ 


r- 


CS 


OS 


t^ 






•ranraix'epj 


CO 


CM 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 

•<* 






s 


































. 




t~ 


00 


C5i 




t^ 


■<*• 


US 


o 


■* 


o 




o 


© 






Ph h3 

O >5 15 cj 


•ranraraipi 


" 00 


00 


00 


OS 


r- 


t>. 


CO 


!>. 


!>. 


oo 


GO 


O0 


00 






K 3 < a 


































































(O 


CO 


oo 


CM 


i-H 


o 


o 


o 


CM 


^ 


CM 


CO 


CO 






•ummTXBj\[ 


Oi 


ca 


oa 


o 


C5 


Oi 


OS 


OS 


OS 


CS 


CS 


CS 


OS 






a a 




■* 


00 


O 


o 




CO 


CO 


o 


1 


1 


CM 


o 


CO 






a o . 

W 1-1 r , 

o a H 


•turiTntuipi 




CM 


CM 


»J0 
CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 

CM 






us 
CM 


US 

CM 


CM 






































" a t> 
































































» g 02 
r« 2 




■"** 


CO 


CM 


CM 


TH 


C3 


us 


■>cH 


1 


1 


CM 


© 


© 




H 


•ranmix'Bpi 


to 


CO 

CM 


CO 

CM 


CO 

CM 


CO 

CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 






CO 

CM 


CO 
CM 


US 

CM 




M 


j a 
































> 


































« 


































a 


CO 






























1 


02 


M >J 




t>. 


"0 


lO 


t^ 


CO 


CO 


CM 


CM 


OS 


CO 


"CH 


•^ 


CM 




a 
o 

W 

a 


a 5 -5 

« ? H > 

I s * Ph fe «< 

Ph H ° K 


•mntniuTj\[ 




CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


US 
CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


US 
CM 


US 
CM 


US 
CM 


US 

CM 






t^ 


CO 


CO 


CO 


t^ 


US 




O 


o 




CO 


CO 


"# 




•ranmtx^j\[ 


CO 
(M 


CO 

CM 


CO 

CM 


CO 

CM 


CO 

CM 


CO 

CM 


CO 
CM 


CO 

CM 


CO 

CM 


CO 

CM 


CO 
CM 


CO 
CM 


CO 
CM 




a 


is 






































a 


































o 






«* 


>o 


«3 


«3 


«5 


tH 


<N 


CO 


■«* 


US 


us 


US 


">* 




£ 


a J • 

a •< 
o a 


•mnniTUTpi 


«o 


CO 

CM 


CO 

CM 


CO 
CM 


CO 

CM 


CO 

CM 


CO 

CM 


CO 

CM 


CO 

CM 


CO 
CM 


CO 
CM 


CD 
CM 


© 
CM 




































«j * 


































2S 




05 


Oi 


o 


o 


»H 


o 


C5 


CSS 


OS 


© 


o 


© 


© 






"ranraTx*Bj\[ 


50 


CO 


t^ 


t^ 


t~ 


t^ 


CD 


CD 


CD 


t~ 


t^ 


t^ 


t^ 






o 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 






a < a 




CN 


^ 


H 




O 


00 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


oo 


*■- 


00 






J CO Q H 


•xnnuiimj\[ 


CN 


US 

CM 


UO 

CM 


"0 
CM 


us 
CM 


CM 


-CM 


CM 


-CH 

CM 


-•* 
CM 


■«aH 
CM 


CM 


CM 






g o a a 

3 w -a 

s S ^ % 
g s o » 

O h K 
CO £ H 




































































^ 


C3S 


O 


O 


00 


oo 


CO 


CO 


t^ 


CS 




OS 


© 






•nmTnTXBi\[ 




CD 
CM 


CM 


CM 


CO 

CM 


CO 

CM 


cO 
CM 


CO 

CM 


CO 

CM 


CO 

CM 


CM 


CO 

CM 


CO 

CM 






CO 


































a 




o 


00 


e» 




o 


oo 


O 


CO 


t^. 


CO 


OS 


© 


t^. 






S* O . 

2 «: * 

!5 ^ O 

S a a 
§aa 


•ranuiiuij^ 


CM 


CM 
CM 


CM 
CM 


CO 
CM 


CO 
CM 


CM 
CM 


CM 
CM 


CM 
CM 


CM 
CM 


CM 
CM 


CM 
CM 


CM 
CM 


CM 
CM 




o 

j3 


































•* 


■>* 


■* 


•>*< 


■* 


CO 


CM 


CO 


CO 


CO 


■* 


OS 


CO 






•ranxnixBj\[ 


CN| 


CM 


CM 


CM 


T*4 

CM 


-*< 

CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CO 
CM 


CM 




o 


► 
































O 
1 

H 

o 

> 
































a" 

05 S in 

a ? G 

Ph O g 
P5 H £ 




"* 


■<** 


CO 


W3 


CO 


^ 


t^. 


o 


CM 




CO 


t~ 


CM 




•umraimpf 


CO 
CM 


CO 
CM 


CO 
CM 


CO 

CM 


CO 
CM 


CO 
CM 


CM 
CM 


CO 

CM 


CO 
CM 


CO 
CM 


CO 
CM 


CM 
CM 


CO 
CM 


































































CO 


o . a 
a 3 a 

3 




































"* 


•"*< 


■* 


•* 


■<cH 


CO 


CO 


CO 


"*t 


CO 


■* 


© 


CO 




w 
a 


•xntiraixepj 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


-<* 
CM 


CM 


CM 


*CH 

CM 


CM 


CM 


•<CH 

CM 


-cH 
CM 


CM 




W 

a 


































CO CO 
































« 


a s 




OO 


l^ 


C5 


O 


00 


r~- 


■«* 


US 


r^ 


US 


oo 


-*! 


t^ 




a 


a O O H 


•ranmiuTj\[ 


CO 
CM 


CO 
CM 


CO 
CM 


CM 


CO 
CM 


co 

CM 


CO 
CM 


CO 
CM 


CO 
CM 


CO 

CM 


CO 
CM 


CO 
CM 


CO 
CM 




H 


o > << a 
h ^ .a 
►3 a a a 
































o 






























































CQ 


2 a o h 

3 5 a * 




00 


00 


C5 


o 


CJ 


00 


t~- 


CO 


CO 


t^. 


00 


to 


00 






•ran raixBi^ 


CM 


-CH 

CM 


CM 


US 
CM 


-*< 

CM 


-*< 

CM 


.CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 








H 


4 


>> 

u 

C3 

3 
C 
c3 


tH 

c3 

3 


^3* 
o 
u 


'S 

a 
< 


>> 

c3 


a 

3 

•-9 


•-s 


3 
tfl 
3 
< 


fc7 

6 


o 

o 
■*■> 
o 

o 


CD 

s 

> 

o 


s 

V 

o 
a 

Q 


co" 

o 
M 
OS 
M 

ca 
> 

< 





204 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Appendix No. 3 . 



WATER WORKS STATISTICS FOR THE YEAR 1917. 
The Metropolitan Water Works supply the Metropolitan Water 
District, which includes the following cities and towns: — 



City or Town. 



Population, 
Census of 1915. 



Estimated 
Population, 
July 1, 1917. 



Boston, 

Somerville, 

Maiden, 

Chelsea, 

Newton, l 

Everett, 

Quincy, 

Medford, 

Melrose, 

Revere, 

Watertown, 

Arlington, 

Milton, 

Winthrop, 

Stoneham, 

Swampscott, 

Lexington, 

Belmont, . 

Nahant, 

Total population of Metropolitan Water District, 
Saugus, 2 ......... 



745,439 

86,854 

48,907 

43,426 

43,113 

37,718 

40,674 

30,509 

16,880 

25,178 

16,515 

14,889 

8,600 

12,758 

7,489 

7,345 

5,538 

8,081 

1,387 



776,520 

91,060 

51,160 

46,300 

44,640 

39,780 

43,110 

33,340 

17,560 

28,070 

17,900 

16,290 

9,050 

14,040 

7,680 

7,770 

5,790 

8,940 

1,480 



1,201,300 
280 



1,260,480 
280 



1 Not regularly supplied from the Metropolitan Water Works, but an emergency supply was furnished 
Jan. 22, 1918. 

2 Only a small portion of Saugus was supplied with water. 

Pumping. 

Chestnut Hill Pumping Station No. 1: — 

Builders of pumping machinery, Holly Manufacturing Company, Quintard 
Iron Works and E. P. Allis Company. 

Description of coal used: — Bituminous: 72.8 per cent. Ake Mine and Daven- 
port. Anthracite: screenings 27.2 per cent. Price per gross ton in bins: 
bituminous $4.51 to $7.65, screenings $4.21 to $4.47. Average price per 
gross ton $5.16. Per cent, ashes 13.2. 

Chestnut Hill Pumping Station No. 2: — 

Builders of pumping machinery, Holly Manufacturing Company. 

Description of coal used: — Bituminous: 62.5 per cent. Ake Mine and Daven- 
port. Anthracite: screenings 37.5 per cent. Price per gross ton in bins: 
bituminous $4.36 to $10.51, screenings $3.25 to $4.29. Average price per 
gross ton $5.37. Per cent, ashes 17.5. 

Spot Pond Station: — 
Builders of pumping machinery, Geo. F. Blake Manufacturing Company and 

Holly Manufacturing Company. 
Description of coal used: — Bituminous: 65.3 per cent. Davenport. Anthracite: 

screenings 34.7 per cent. Price per gross ton in bins: bituminous $6.64 to 

$9.49, screenings $5.39. Average price per gross ton $7.56. Per cent, ashes 16.1. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



205 



• 


Chestnut Hill Pumping Stations. 




No. 1. 


No. 2. 




Engines 

Nos. 
1 and 2. 


Engine 
No. 3. 


Engine 
No. 4. 


Engine 
No. 12. 


Daily pumping capacity (gallons), .... 
Coal consumed for year (pounds),. .... 
Cost of pumping, figured on pumping station ex- 
penses, 

Total pumpage for year, corrected for slip (million 

Average dynamic head (feet), ..... 

Gallons pumped per pound of coal, .... 

Duty on basis of plunger displacement, 

Cost per million gallons raised to reservoir, 

Cost per million foot gallons, ..... 


16,000,000 
2,073,543 

$12,577.03 

1,016.02 

133.48 

489.99 

56,170,000 

$12.3787 

.0927 


20,000,000 
20,014 

$111.53 

10.02 

116.65 

500.65 

50,880,000 

$11.1307 

.0954 


30,000,000 
1,992,650 

$13,947.57 

2,824.12 

120.36 

1,417.27 

144,960,000 

$4.9387 

.0410 


40,000,000 
6,242,526 

$29,135.78 

9,368.71 

121.70 

1,500.79 

155,230,000 

$3 . 1099 

.0256 





Chestnut Hill 

Pumping 
Station No. 2. 


Spot Pond 
Station. 




Engines Nos. 5, 
6 and 7. 


Engines Nos. 8 
and 9. 


Daily pumping capacity (gallons), . . * . 

Coal consumed for year (pounds), 

Cost of pumping, figured on pumping station expenses, 
Total pumpage for year, corrected for slip (million gallons), 
Average dynamic head (feet), ....... 

Gallons pumped per pound of coal, . . . . 

Duty on basis of plunger displacement, ..... 

Cost per million gallons raised to reservoir, 

Cost per million foot gallons, ........ 


105,000,000 

3,854,610 

$30,537.01 

7,013.97 

33.24 

1,819.63 

51,420,000 

$4.3537 

.1310 


30,000,000 

2,876,199 

$23,040.94 

2,802.56 

130.08 

974.40 

107,730,OQO 

$8.2214 

.0632 



Consumption. 

Estimated total population of the eighteen cities and towns sup- 
plied wholly or partially during the year 1917, . . . 1,215,840 

Total consumption (gallons), meter basis, 40,161,778,000 1 

Average daily consumption (gallons), meter basis, . . . 110,032,000 

Gallons per day to each inhabitant, meter basis, ... 90 . 5 



Distribution. 





Owned and 






operated by 


Total in District 




Metropolitan 


supplied 




Water 


by Metropolitan 




and Sewerage 


Water Works. 




Board. 






-2 


-2 


Sizes, ..... 


76-4 inch. 


76-4 inch. 


Extensions, less length abandoned (miles), 


0.07 


18.46 


Length in use (miles), 


122.34 


1,901.29 




12 


- 




533 


- 




- 


2,803 




- 


182,192 




- 


4,622 




- 


131,630 




- 


236 


Fire hydrants now in use, . 


— 


17,543 



1 58.79 per cent, pumped; 41.21 per cent, by gravity. 

2 Cast-iron, cement-lined wrought-iron, cement-lined steel and kalamine pipe. 



206 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Appendix No. 4. 



Contracts made and pending during 
Contracts relating to the 





1. 

Number 

of 
Contract. 


2. 
WORK. 


3. 

Num- 
ber of 
Bids. 


Amount of Bid. 


6. 




4. 

Next to 
Lowest. 


5. 

Lowest. 


Contractor. 


1 

2 


1351 
1401 


Section 1, Deer Island outfall 
extension, North Metropoli- 
tan System, Deer Island, 
Boston Harbor. 

6,900 tons of coal: — 
2,700 tons for Deer Island 

pumping station. 
3,000 tons for East Boston 

pumping station. 
1,200 tons for Charlestown 

pumping station. 


3 

2 
2 
2 


$62,612 00 

$6,02 per 

ton. 
$5,84 per 

ton. 
$5.84 per 

ton. 


$38,930 00 2 

$5.90 per 

ton. 2 
$5.65 per 

ton. 2 
$5.75 per 

ton. 2 


Roy H. Beattie, Inc., 
Fall River. 

New England Coal and 
Coke Company, Bos- 
ton. 



Contract completed. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



207 



Appendix No. 4. 



the Year 1917 — Sewerage Works. 
North Metropolitan System. 



7. 



Date of Con- 
tract. 



8. 

Date of 

Completion 

of Work. 



9. 



Prices of Principal Items of Contracts 
made in 1917. 



10. 

Value of 

Work done 

Dec. 31, 

1917. 



April 22, 1916 



June 14, 1916 



Dec. 5, 1917 



July 1, 1917 



$43,873 92 



39,189 56 



2 Contract based upon this bid. 



208 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Contracts relating to the 





1. 

Number 

of 
Contract. 


2. 
WORK. 


3. 

Num- 
ber of 
Bids. 


Amount op Bid. 


6. 




4. 

Next to 
Lowest. 


5. 

Lowest. 


Contractor. 


1 

2 
3 

4 
5 


1331 

1361 
138 

1411 
143 


Section 104, High-level sewer, 
Wellesley extension, South 
Metropolitan System in 
Needham. 

Two vertical fire tube boilers 
for Ward Street pumping 
station. 

Section 98, High-level sewer, 
Wellesley extension, South 
Metropolitan System in 
West Roxbury and Dedham. 

2,500 tons of coal for Ward 
Street pumping station. 

Section 102, High-level sewer, 
Wellesley extension, South 
Metropolitan System in 
Needham. 


8 

2 
3 

1 
3 


$64,272 50 

12,300 00 
79,040 00 

66,293 40 


$59,055 00 2 

9,160 00 2 
54,630 00 2 

$5.63 per 
ton. 2 

$62,041 75 2 


Bay State Dredging 
and Contracting 
Company, Boston. 

D. M. Dillon Steam 
Boiler Works, Fitch- 
burg. 

Thomas Russo & Co., 
Boston. 

Staples Coal Company 
Boston. 

Bruno & Petitti, Bos- 
ton. 



i Contract completed. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



209 



South Metropolitan System. 



7. 



Date of Con- 
tract. 



8. 

Date of 

Completion 

of Work. 



9. 



Prices of Principal Items of Contracts 
made in 1917. 



10. 

Value of 

Work done 

Dec. 31, 

1917. 



Dec. 22, 1915 



May 20, 1916 



July 13, 1916 



June 14, 1916 



Oct. 2, 1916 



Jan. 20, 1917 



March 9, 1917 



July 1, 1917 



Work abandoned by the Contractor before any portion 
was completed. Work provided for is now being 
completed in accordance with the specifications by 
Geo. M. Bryne. 



$62,232 47 



9,160 00 



140,245 58 



14,316 10 



66,081 29 



2 Contract based upon this bid. 



210 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Contracts made and pending during the year 1917 — Sewerage Works 

— Concluded. 

Summary of Contracts. 



Value of 

Work done Dec. 

31, 1917. 



North Metropolitan System, 2 contracts, 

South Metropolitan System, 5 contracts, 

Total of 7 contracts made and pending during the year 1917, 



$83,063 48 
292,035 44 . 



$375,098 92 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 211 



Appendix No . 5. 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT PRESENTED TO THE GENERAL COURT 

ON JANUARY 16, 1918. 

The Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board respectfully presents 
the following abstract of the account of its receipts, expenditures, 
disbursements, assets and liabilities for the year ending November 
30, 1917, together with recommendations for legislation which it 
deems desirable, in accordance with the provisions of chapter 235 
of the Acts of the year 1906. 

Metropolitan Water Works. 

Construction. 
The loans authorized for expenditures under the Metropolitan 
Water acts, the receipts which are added to the loan fund, the ex- 
penditures for the construction and acquisition of works, and the 
balance available on December 1, 1917, have been as follows: — 

Loans authorized under Metropolitan Water acts, . . . $42,798,000 00 
Receipt from town of Swampscott for admission to Metropolitan 

Water District, paid into Loan Fund (St. 1909, c. 320), . 90,000 00 

Receipts from the sales of property which are placed to the 
credit of the Metropolitan Water Loan Fund: — 
For the year ending November 30, 1917, . $3,049 83 
For the period prior to December 1, 1916, . 250,597 81 

343,647 64 



Amount approved for payment by the Board out of the Met- 
ropolitan Water Loan Fund: — 
For the year ending November 30, 1917, . $68,938 11 
For the period prior to December 1, 1916, 42,911,903 14 



$43,141,647 64 



42,980,841 25 

Balance December 1, 1917, $160,806 39 

The amount of the Metropolitan Water Loan bonds issued at the 
end of the fiscal year was $42,752,000, bonds to the amount of 
$150,000 having been issued during the year. Of the total amount 



212 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

issued, $41,398,000 were sinking fund bonds, and the remainder, 
amounting to $1,354,000, were issued as serial bonds. 

At the end of the year the amount of outstanding bonds was 
$42,648,000, as bonds issued on the serial payment plan to the 
amount of $104,000 had been paid. During the fiscal year $32,000 
in serial bonds has been paid. 

The Metropolitan Water Loan Sinking Fund amounted on De- 
cember 1, 1917, to $14,036,278.88, an increase during the year of 
$768,079.52. 

Maintenance. 

Amount appropriated for the maintenance and oper- 
ation of works, for the year ending November 30, 
1917, $572,900 00 

Special appropriation for protection of water supply 

in aqueducts (1911) remaining, .... 9,930 60 

Special appropriations for protection and improve- 
ment of the water supply (1912, 1913 and 1916) 
remaining, 21,455 13 

Receipts credited to this fund for the year ending 

November 30, 1917, 3,304 50 

$607,590 23 

Amount approved by Board for maintenance and operation of 

works during the year ending November 30, 1917, . . . 510,679 43 



Balance December 1, 1917, . . . . . . .- . $96,910 80 

This balance includes the sum of $9,930.60, the amount remaining 
unexpended of the special appropriation for the protection of the 
water supply in aqueducts, and the sums of $2,713.93, the amount 
remaining unexpended of the special appropriation in 1912, and 
$56.89 of the special appropriation in 1913, and $7,533.54 of the 
appropriation in 1916 for the protection and improvement of the 
water supply. 

The Board has also received during the year ending November 30, 
1917, $74,023.22 from rentals, the sale of land, land products and 
power and from other proceeds from the operations of the Board, 
which, according to section 18 of the Metropolitan Water Act, are 
applied by the Treasurer of the Commonwealth to the payment of 
interest on the Metropolitan Water Loan, to sinking fund require- 
ments, and expenses of maintenance and operation of works, in 
reduction of the amount to be assessed upon the Metropolitan 
Water District for the year. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 213 

Sums received from sales of water to municipalities not belonging 
to the District and to water companies, and from municipalities for 
admission to the District, have been applied as follows : — 

For the period prior to December 1, 1906, distributed to the cities 
and towns of the District, as provided by section 3 of the Met- 
ropolitan Water Act, $219,865 65 

For the period beginning December 1, 1906, and prior to December 
1, 1916, applied to the Metropolitan Water Loan Sinking Fund, 
as provided by chapter 238 of the Acts of 1907, .... 72,666 07 

For the year beginning December 1, 1916, and ending November 
30, 1917, applied to the Metropolitan Water Loan Sinking Fund, 
as provided by said last-named act, 4,134 35 

$296,666 07 
Metropolitan Sewerage Works. 

Construction. 

The loans authorized under the various acts of the Legislature 
for the construction of the Metropolitan Sewerage Works, the re- 
ceipts which are added to the proceeds of the loans, and the ex- 
penditures for construction, are given below, as follows : — 

North Metropolitan System. 

Loans authorized for expenditures for construc- 
tion under the various acts, including those for 
the Revere, Belmont and Maiden extensions, 
North System enlargements and extensions, 
New Mystic sewer, Deer Island Outfall ex- 
tension, lowering sewer siphon under Maiden 
River, balance of appropriation under chapter 
76, Resolves of 1915, and for the Reading ex- 
tension, $7,512,365 73 

Receipts from sales of real estate and from mis- 
cellaneous sources, which are placed to the 
credit of the North Metropolitan System: — 
For the year ending November 30, 1917, 
For the period prior to December 1, 1916, 
Amount approved for payment by the Board 1 
out of the Metropolitan Sewerage Loan Fund, 
North System: — 
For the year ending November 30, 1917, 
For the period prior to December 1, 1916, 



Balance December 1, 1917, 

1 The word "Board" refers to the Metropolitan Sewerage Commission and its successor, the Metro- 
politan Water and Sewerage Board. 



127 57 

85,648 89 

L 




t 


$37,829 87 
7,246,534 49 


$7,598,142 19 


$7,284,364 36 




$313,777 83 



214 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

South Metropolitan System. 

Loans authorized for expenditures for construc- 
tion under the various acts, applied to the con- 
struction of the Charles River valley sewer, 
Neponset valley sewer, High-level sewer and 
extensions (including Wellesley Branch), and 
an additional appropriation authorized by 
chapter 285, General Acts of 1917, and for ad- 
ditional Ward Street station pumping plant, . $9,587,046 27 
Receipts for pumping, sales of real estate and 
from miscellaneous sources, which are placed to 
the credit of the South Metropolitan System : — 
For the year ending November 30, 1917, . 282 52 

For the period prior to December 1, 1916, . 19,101 41 

Amount approved by Board for payment as 
follows: — 

On account of the Charles River valley 

sewer, . . . $800,046 27 

On account of the Neponset valley sewer, . 911,531 46 

On account of the High-level sewer and ex- 
tensions : — 
For the year ending November 30, 1917, . 248,784 36 

For the period prior to December 1, 1916, 7,384,405 67 



$9,606,430 20 $9,344,767 76 
Balance December 1, 1917, ....... $261,662 44 

The amount of the Metropolitan Sewerage Loan bonds issued at 
the end of the fiscal year was $16,761,412, bonds to the amount of 
$325,000 having been issued during the year. Of the total amount 
issued, $15,440,912 were sinking fund bonds, and the remainder, 
amounting to $1,320,500, were serial bonds. 

At the end of the year the amount of the outstanding bonds was 
$16,665,412, as bonds issued on the serial payment plan to the 
amount of $36,500 had been paid during the year, $96,000 having 
been paid to December 1, 1917. 

Of the total amount outstanding at the end of the year, $7,413,500 
was issued for the North Metropolitan System and $9,251,912 for 
the South Metropolitan System. The Metropolitan Sewerage Loan 
Sinking Fund amounted on December 1, 1917, to $3,925,792.75, of 
which $2,475,165.88 was on account of the North Metropolitan 
System and $1,450,626.87 w r as on account of the South Metropolitan 
System, an increase during the year of $321,135.48. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 215 

The net debt on December 1, 1917, was $12,739,619.25, a de- 
crease of $33,635.48. 

Included in the above figures for the North Metropolitan System 
is $925,500 in serial bonds, of which $75,000 has been paid, and 
$395,000 for the South Metropolitan System, of which $21,000 has 
been paid. 

Maintenance. 

North Metropolitan System. 

Appropriated for the year ending November 30, 1917, . . . $210,666 66 
Receipts from pumping and from other sources, which are returned 
to the appropriation: — 
For the year ending November 30, 1917, 262 97 

$210,929 63 
Amount approved for payment by the Board : — 

For the year ending November 30, 1917, 187,408 58 

Balance December 1, 1917, $23,521 05 

South Metropolitan System. 

Appropriated for the year ending November 30, 1917, . . . $135,666 67 
Receipts from sales of property and for pumping, which are re- 
turned to the appropriation: — 
For the year ending November 30, 1917, ..... 27986 

$135,946 53 
Amount approved for payment by the Board: — 

For the year ending November 30, 1917, 130,685 35 

Balance December 1, 1917, $5,261 18 



216 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 



Appendix No. 6 . 



LEGISLATION OF THE YEAR 1917 AFFECTING THE 
METROPOLITAN WATER AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



General Acts, 1917. 

Chapter 3. 

An Act to authorize the construction of a trunk line 
of the north metropolitan sewerage district 
across a part of the town of reading. 

Be it enacted, etc., as follows: 
1916(G), 159, §2, Section 1. Section two of chapter one hundred and 

amended. x 

fifty-nine of the General Acts of the year nineteen hundred 

and sixteen is hereby amended by inserting before the 

word "Wakefield", in the fifth and sixth lines, the word: 

North metro- — Reading, — so as to read as follows: — Section 2. The 

politan sewerage ... j i j i n «j 

district, trunk metropolitan water and sewerage board shall provide an 

line sewer may ,, , i -r» t i • • t»i 

be constructed outlet at the Heading town line in or near Brook street 
for the sewage of said town, and, acting on behalf of the 
commonwealth shall construct a main trunk sewer or 
sewers through such parts of the towns of Reading, Wake- 
field and Stoneham and the city of Woburn from the 
Reading town line to such point in the north metropolitan 
system as said board may determine to be necessary in order 
to connect with a main trunk sewer in the Mystic valley. 
Section 2. This act shall take effect upon its passage. 
[Approved February 8, 1917. 



Chapter 285. 

An Act to provide for completing the extension 
of the south metropolitan sewer to the town of 
wellesley. 

Be it enacted, etc., as follows: 
Commonwealth Section 1. The treasurer and receiver general, in order 

to issue bonds , 

for completion to provide for the completion of the extension of the high- 

of the south * * 

metropolitan level sewer authorized by chapter three hundred and forty- 
sewer to town * 
of Weiiesiey. three of the acts of the year nineteen hundred and fourteen, 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. ■ 217 

shall, with the approval of the governor and council, issue 
from time to time scrip or certificates of indebtedness in 
the name and behalf of the commonwealth and under its 
seal, to an amount not exceeding three hundred and twenty- 
five thousand dollars, in addition to the amount authorized 
by said chapter; and the provisions of said chapter and of 
chapter four hundred and twenty-four of the acts of the 
year eighteen hundred and ninety-nine, and of all acts in 
amendment thereof and in addition thereto shall, so far 
as they may be applicable, apply to the indebtedness and 
proceedings authorized by this act. 

Section 2. This act shall take effect upon its passage. 
[Approved May 24, 1917. 



Chapter 287. 

An Act to authorize the metropolitan water and 
sewerage board to construct a powder transmission 
line between the wachusett dam and the sudbury 

DAM. 

Be it enacted, etc., as follows: 

Section 1. To enable the metropolitan water and Metropolitan 

t • water and 

sewerage board to construct a line for the transmission of sewerage board 

• • i i • i ^° cons ^ ruc * 

electricity between the power station at the Wachusett power transmis- 

i • /-.!• ii • i n n i siOnhnebe- 

dam in Clinton and the power station at the budbury dam tween Wachu- 

oii i i i • r» i ill sett anc * Sud- 

in Southborough, under authority of chapter one hundred bury dams. 
and seventy-two of the General Acts of the year nineteen 
hundred and sixteen, the treasurer and receiver-general 
shall issue from time to time, upon the request of said 
board, bonds in the name and behalf of the commonwealth, 
designated on the face thereof, Metropolitan Water Loan, Metropolitan 
Act of 1917, to an amount not exceeding twelve thousand of 1917. 
dollars, to be taken from the unexpended balance of forty- 
six thousand dollars authorized by chapter six hundred 
and ninety-four of the acts of the year nineteen hundred 
and twelve; and the provisions of chapter four hundred and 
eighty-eight of the acts of the year eighteen hundred and 
ninety-five, and of acts in amendment thereof and in 
addition thereto, shall, so far as they may be applicable, 
apply to the indebtedness and proceedings authorized by 
this act. 

Section 2. This act shall take effect upon its passage. 
[Approved May 24, 1917. 



218 



METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 



Metropolitan 
water and 
sewerage board 
may sell, etc., 
water to United 
States concen- 
tration camps. 



Certain provi- 
sions of law to 
apply. 



Chapter 314. 

An Act to authorize the metropolitan water and 
sewerage board to sell and deliver water to 
concentration camps established by the united 

STATES. 

Be it enacted, etc., as follows: 

Section 1. The metropolitan water and sewerage board 
is authorized to sell and deliver water from any of the 
reservoirs or aqueducts of the metropolitan water system 
to any concentration camp established in this common- 
wealth by the United States, and to lay and maintain such 
pipe lines and other works as may be necessary for the 
purpose, upon such terms and conditions as may be agreed 
upon by the duly authorized officer or representative of the 
United States government and said board. 

Section 2. The provisions of chapter four hundred and 
eighty-eight of the acts of the year eighteen hundred and 
ninety-five and acts in amendment thereof shall apply to 
this act. 

Section 3. This act shall take effect upon its passage. 
[Approved May 25, 1917. 



Chapter 322. 

An Act to provide for the construction of a water 
main in the east boston district of the city of 
boston by the metropolitan water and sewerage 

BOARD. 

Be it enacted, etc., as follows: 
New water main Section 1. The metropolitan water and sewerage board 

for East Boston. r ... 

is hereby authorized to construct a new thirty-six inch 
water main about eighteen hundred feet in length to pro- 
vide an additional supply of water for the East Boston 
district of the city of Boston. 

Section 2. To meet the expenses incurred under the 
provisions of this act, the treasurer and receiver general 
shall issue from time to time, upon the request of said 
board, bonds in the name and behalf of the commonwealth 
and under its seal, designated on the face thereof Metro- 
Metropolitan politan Water Loan, Act of 1917, to an amount not ex- 

W titer I oud Act 

of*i9i7. ceeding thirty thousand dollars, to be taken from the 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 219 

unexpended balance of the amount authorized by chapter 
six hundred and ninety-four of the acts of the year nine- 
teen hundred and twelve, and the provisions of chapter four 
hundred and eighty-eight of the acts of the year eighteen 
hundred and ninety-five, and acts in amendment thereof 
and in addition thereto, shall, so far as are applicable, 
apply to the indebtedness and proceedings authorized by 
this act. 

Section 3. This act shall take effect upon its passage. 
[Approved May 25, 1917: 



Special Acts, 1917. 

Chapter 150. 

An Act relative to the water supply of the town of 

ASHLAND. 

Be it enacted, etc., as follows: 

Section 1. Section two of chapter four hundred and 1908 > 4 _,56, § 2, 

x ( amended. 

fifty-six of the acts of the year nineteen hundred and eight 
is hereby amended by striking out the semicolon after the 
word "corporation", in the seventh line, and inserting in 
place thereof the words : — or the whole or any part of its 
supply of water from any municipal corporation owning and 
operating water works, whose territory joins that of the 
town of Ashland, and any such municipal corporation is 
hereby authorized to furnish water for the town of Ashland 
upon terms mutually agreed upon, and from its own au- 
thorized sources of supply, — so as to read as follows : — 

Section 2. Said town, for the purposes aforesaid, may Town of Ash- 

j. i u -u xi~ j i- i j j. 1. land ma y take 

take, or acquire by purchase or otherwise, and hold the certain water 

nffiit's etc 

waters of any pond or stream or of any ground sources 
of supply, by means of driven, artesian or other wells 
within the limits of the town, and the water rights con- 
nected with any such water sources, or may purchase 
water from any individual or corporation or the whole or 
any part of its supply of water from any municipal cor- 
poration owning and operating water works, whose territory 
joins that of the town of Ashland, and any such municipal 
corporation is hereby authorized to furnish water for the 
town of Ashland upon terms mutually agreed upon, and 
from its own authorized sources of supply; and may avail 
itself of its existing rights and privileges reserved to it by 



220 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

the provisions of chapter one hundred and seventy-seven 
of the acts of the year eighteen hundred and seventy-two: 

Proviso. provided, however, that nothing in this act shall be construed 

as increasing such rights and privileges, or may make 
arrangements for obtaining water from the metropolitan 
water system which shall be satisfactory to the town and 
to the metropolitan water and sewerage board, and may 

May take lands, also take, or acquire by purchase or otherwise, and hold 
all lands, rights of way and easements necessary for collect- 
ing, storing, holding, purifying and preserving the purity 
of the water and for conveying the same to any part of said 

Proviso as to in- town; provided, that there is no infringement upon the 

fringement upon , . . 

rights of metro- existing rights and privileges of the metropolitan water 
system. system excepting as allowed for above, and provided, that 

no source of water supply and no lands necessary for 
preserving the quality of such water, shall be taken or used 
without first obtaining the advice and approval of the 
state board of health, and that the location of all dams, 
reservoirs and wells to be used as sources of water supply 
under this act shall be subject to the approval of said 
May erect struc- board. Said town may construct on the lands acquired 

tures, lay pipes, ^ n 

etc - and held under the provisions of this act, proper dams, 

reservoirs, standpipes, tanks, buildings, fixtures and other 
structures, and may make excavations, procure and operate 
machinery and provide such other means and appliances 
and do such other things as may be necessary for the 
establishment and maintenance of complete and effective 
water works; and for that purpose may construct wells 
and reservoirs, and establish pumping works, and may 
construct, lay and maintain aqueducts, conduits, pipes 
and other works under or over any land, water courses, 
railroads, railways and public or other ways, and along 
such ways in the town of Ashland, in such manner as not 
unnecessarily to obstruct the same; and for the purpose of 
constructing, laying, maintaining, operating and repairing 
such conduits, pipes and other works, and for all proper 
purposes of this act, said town may dig up or raise and 
embank any such lands, highways or other ways in such 
manner as to cause the least hindrance to public travel on 
such ways. Said town shall not enter upon, construct or 
lay any conduits, pipes or other works within the location 
of a railroad corporation, except at such time and in such 
manner as it may agree upon with such corporation, or, in 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 221 

case of failure so to agree, as may be approved by the board 
of railroad commissioners. 

Section 2. This act shall take effect upon its passage. 
[Approved March 1, 1917. 



Chapter 269. 

An Act relative to the installation of water meters 
in the city of boston. 

Be it enacted, etc., as follows: 

The provisions of section one of chapter five hundred and installation of 

r *■ water meters in 

twenty-four of the acts of the year nineteen hundred and Boston, 
seven shall not apply to the city of Boston for the period 
of one year after the passage of this act, so far as such 
provisions relate to the equipment with water meters of 
five per cent of the water services in that city which were 
unmetered on the thirty-first day of December, nineteen 
hundred and seven. [Approved April 10, 1917. 



Chapter 322. 

An Act in addition to the several acts making appro- 
priations FOR SUNDRY MISCELLANEOUS EXPENSES 
AUTHORIZED BY LAW. 

Be it enacted, etc., as follows: 

Section 1. The sums hereinafter mentioned are hereby 
appropriated, to be paid out of the treasury of the common- 
wealth from the ordinary revenue, unless otherwise specified, 
to wit: — 

For the investigation by the metropolitan water and metropolian ° f 
sewerage board of the condition and capacity of the present s l^^ 0Q 
metropolitan sewer in the town of Arlington, as authorized 
by chapter twenty-two of the resolves of the present year, 
to be paid from the North Metropolitan Sewerage Main- 
tenance Fund, a sum not exceeding one thousand dollars. 

Section 2. This act shall take effect upon its passage. 
[Approved May 9, 1917. 



222 



METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 



Basis of certain 
payments in 
lieu of taxes to 
the town of Ster- 
ling changed. 



Repeal. 



Chapter 346. 

An Act to change the basis of payments in lieu of 
taxes on real estate held by the commonwealth 
in the town of sterling for purposes of the 
metropolitan water supply. 

Be it enacted, etc., as follows: 

Section 1. Property held by the commonwealth in 
the town of Sterling for the purposes of the metropolitan 
water supply, if yielding no rent, shall not be liable to 
taxation therein, but the commonwealth shall annually in 
September pay to said town an amount equal to that which 
the town would receive for taxes upon the average of the 
assessed value of such land without buildings or other 
structures, for the three years last preceding the acquisition 
thereof, the valuation for each year being reduced by all 
abatements thereon; but any part of such land or buildings 
from which any revenue in the nature of rent is received 
shall be subject to taxation; and the provisions of sections 
eight, nine and ten of Part I of chapter four hundred and 
ninety of the acts of the year nineteen hundred and nine, 
and amendments thereof, shall apply to the reimbursement 
of said town by the commonwealth on account of said 
property. 

Section 2. Section two of chapter four hundred and 
forty-five of the acts of the year eighteen hundred and 
ninety-seven is hereby repealed. [Approved May 23, 1917. 



Investigation as 
to sewage 
disposal in the 
towns of 
Arlington and 
Lexington. 



Chapter 22. 

Resolve to provide for an investigation as to sewage 
disposal in the towns of arlington and lexington. 

Resolved, That the metropolitan water and sewerage 
board shall investigate the condition and capacity of the 
present metropolitan sewer in the town of Arlington with 
especial reference to its capacity to receive and dispose of 
the sewage of that part of the town of Arlington tributary 
to the same, and of the town of Lexington. The said 
board is also authorized and directed to report a plan for 
the new sewer contemplated by section four of chapter 
five hundred and twenty of the acts of the year eighteen 
hundred and ninety-seven, in the valley of Mill or Sucker 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 223 

Brook, so situated as to serve all parts of the said valley 
and such adjacent territory as, in the opinion of the board, 
should be served by the same. The board may employ 
such engineering or other assistance as may be necessary, 
and may incur an expense not exceeding one thousand 
dollars in carrying out the provisions of this resolve. The 
board shall report to the present general court not later 
than the first day of May, with plans and estimates of the 
cost of such construction as it may recommend. [Approved 
March 8, 1917. 

Chapter 114. 

Resolve relative to the payment by the common- 
wealth OF A SUM OF MONEY TO JACOB LANDER AND 
HARRIS LANDER. 

Resolved, That the metropolitan water and sewerage Jacob Lander 
board be authorized to investigate the claim of Jacob Lander. 
Lander and Harris Lander of Sherborn for damage to their 
property at Saxonville in the town of Framingham by 
reason of water escaping or released from a reservoir under 
the control of the metropolitan water and sewerage board, 
and to report to the next general court on or before the 
second Wednesday in January what compensation, if any, 
should justly be paid to them. [Approved May 24, 1917. 



224 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



INDEX TO LEGISLATION OF THE YEAR 1917 AFFECTING THE 
METROPOLITAN WATER AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



APPROPRIATIONS. 

to provide for completing extension of South Metropolitan sewer to 
Wellesley, . . . . . . . . . . 

to provide for construction of Wachusett-Sudbury transmission line, . 
to provide for construction of water main in East Boston, . 
to provide for an investigation of Arlington sewer, ... 

ARLINGTON. 

relative to investigation of sewage disposal in Arlington and 
Lexington, ........... 

ASHLAND. 

relative to water supply for, ....... 



Chap. Sect. 



G. 285 
G. 287 
G. 322 
S. 322 



Res. 22 

S. 322 

S. 150 



B. 
BOSTON. 

relative to installation of water meters in, 



S. 269 



EAST BOSTON. 

construction of water main in, 



E. 



G. 322 



LANDER, JACOB AND HARRIS. 

relative to payment of money to, 



Res. 114 



M. 

METROPOLITAN WATER AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 

authorized to construct water main in East Boston, 
authorized to sell water to United States concentration camps, . 



G. 322 
G. 314 



READING. 

authorizing construction of trunk line sewer of North Metropolitan 

Sewerage District across part of town of, . . . . G. 



S. 
STERLING. 

to make change in basis of payments in lieu of taxes, 



S. 346 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 225 



u. 

UNITED STATES CONCENTRATION CAMPS. Chap. Sect. 

authority to supply water to, . . . . . . G. 314 1 

W. 

WACHUSETT-SUDBURY TRANSMISSION LINE. 

to authorize construction of, ....... G. 287 1 

WATER METERS. 

relative to installation of, in Boston, ...... S. 269 1 

WELLESLET. 

to provide for completing extension of South Metropolitan sewer to . G. 285 1 




5V-£ 



- B.H. Ref. SS^S%- 
Retumed to. Stack